Paper - 1 ( THEORY

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PHYSICS Paper – 1 (THEORY) (Three hours) (Candidates are allowed additional 15 minutes for only reading the paper. They must NOT start writing during this time) ---------------------------------------------------- Answer all questions in Part I and six questions from Part II, choosing two questions from each of the Sections A, B and C. All working, including rough work, should be done on the same sheet as, and adjacent to, the rest of the answer.
  • potential energy of the system
  • circuit diagram of a full wave rectifier
  • angular momentum of an electron
  • magnetic wave
  • thin converging lens of focal length
  • electric field of intensity
  • speed of light
  • point

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Secondary School
Course

Classification

U.S. Department of Education System: SchoolNCES 2007-341
Codes for the
Exchange of Data
(SCED)








Secondary School
Course

Classification
System: School


Codes for the U.S. Department of Education
NCES 2007-341
Exchange of Data
(SCED)



June 2007



Denise Bradby
Rosio Pedroso
MPR Associates, Inc.

Andy Rogers
Consultant
Quality Information Partners

Lee Hoffman
Project Officer
National Center for
Education Statistics



U.S. Department of Education
Margaret Spellings
Secretary
Institute of Education Sciences
Grover J. Whitehurst
Director
National Center for Education Statistics
Mark Schneider
Commissioner
The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) is the primary federal entity for collecting, analyzing, and reporting data
related to education in the United States and other nations. It fulfills a congressional mandate to collect, collate, analyze, and
report full and complete statistics on the condition of education in the United States; conduct and publish reports and specialized
analyses of the meaning and significance of such statistics; assist state and local education agencies in improving their statistical
systems; and review and report on education activities in foreign countries.
NCES activities are designed to address high-priority education data needs; provide consistent, reliable, complete, and accurate
indicators of education status and trends; and report timely, useful, and high-quality data to the U.S. Department of Education,
the Congress, the states, other education policymakers, practitioners, data users, and the general public. Unless specifically
noted, all information contained herein is in the public domain.
We strive to make our products available in a variety of formats and in language that is appropriate to a variety of audiences.
You, as our customer, are the best judge of our success in communicating information effectively. If you have any comments or
suggestions about this or any other NCES product or report, we would like to hear from you. Please direct your comments to
National Center for Education Statistics

Institute of Education Sciences

U.S. Department of Education

1990 K Street NW

Washington, DC 20006-5651

June 2007

The NCES World Wide Web Home Page address is http://nces.ed.gov.

The Web Electronic Catalog is http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch.

Suggested Citation
Bradby, D., Pedroso, R., and Rogers, A. (2007). Secondary School Course Classification System: School Codes for the Exchange of
Data (SCED) (NCES 2007-341). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
For ordering information on this report, write to
U.S. Department of Education

ED Pubs

P.O. Box 1398

Jessup, MD 20794-1398

or call toll free 1-877-4ED-Pubs or order online at http://www.edpubs.org.
Content Contact
Ghedam Bairu
(202) 502-7304
ghedam.bairu@ed.gov


ii

Foreword

Secondary School Course Classification System: School Codes for the Exchange of Data (SCED)
presents a taxonomy and course descriptions for secondary education. The system is intended to help
schools and education agencies maintain longitudinal information about students’ coursework in an
efficient, standardized format that facilitates the exchange of records as students transfer from one
school to another, or to postsecondary education.
SCED is part of the National Center for Education Statistics’ data handbook series, which is published
as a searchable electronic database, Handbooks Online (http://nces.ed.gov/programs/handbook/). NCES
has developed a series of data handbooks to provide guidance on consistency in data definitions and the
maintenance of education data, so that such data can be accurately aggregated and analyzed. The
handbooks are intended to serve as reference documents for public and private education agencies,
schools, early childhood centers, and other educational institutions, as well as by researchers involved in
the collection of education data. In addition, the handbooks may be useful to elected officials and
members of the public who have an interest in education information. The handbooks are not, however,
data collection instruments, nor do they reflect any type of federal data maintenance requirements.
Handbooks Online is reviewed and updated annually.
Education agencies and institutions collect and maintain information to help the education system
function efficiently and effectively. Standardized data available to education agency officials can
• assist in the development of sound educational policies at all levels;
• improve the quality of instruction and boost student achievement;
• help compare information among communities and among states;
• improve the accuracy and timeliness of nationwide summaries of information about education
systems;
• improve the quality and significance of education research―locally, statewide, and nationwide;
and
• enhance reporting to the public about the condition and progress of education.
It is the intent of Secondary School Course Classification System: School Codes for the Exchange of
Data (SCED) to provide educators and data managers with a tool that will support decision-making in
these ways.






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iv


Acknowledgments

The following individuals graciously gave their time to provide valuable input and information at the
outset of the project:
Clifford Adelman, U.S Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education
(OVAE);
Nancy Adelman, SRI International;
Barbara Andrepont, Schools Interoperability Framework Association;
Greg Berg, Idaho Department of Education;
Janis Brown, U.S Department of Education, National Center of Education Statistics (NCES);
Rupa Datta, NORC;
Lee Hoffman, U.S Department of Education, National Center of Education Statistics (NCES);
Myrna Holgate, Idaho Department of Education;
Steven Ingels, RTI International;
Mark Kuskie, Idaho Departme
Charles Masten, University of California;
Coleen McClanahan, Iowa Department of Education;
Karen Mitchell, SRI International;
Jeffrey Owings, U.S Department of Education, National Center of Education Statistics (NCES);
Rob Perkins, Westat;
Shep Roey, Westat;
Leslie Scott, Education Statistics Services Institute, AIR;
Lee Tack, Iowa Department of Education;
Ellen Wetzel, NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse; and
Raymond Yeagley, Northwest Evaluation Association.
The following people reviewed subject areas and course descriptions and, as needed, supplied
recommendations for revision:
Nancy Beben, Louisiana Department of Education;
Tony Glenn, Nebraska Departme
Patti High, Oklahoma Department of Education;
Julane Hill, Nebraska Department of Education;
W. Tad Johnston, Maine Departme
John Kennedy, Maine Departme
Coleen McClanahan, Iowa Department of Education;
Vickie Scow, Nebraska Department of Education;
Bill Seitter, Weatherford Public Schools, Oklahoma;
Bonnie Sibert, Nebraska Departme
Willie Stroble, Virginia Department of Education;

v

Debra K. Sullivan, Principal, Charleston Catholic High School, Charleston, West Virginia; and
Jeffrey A. Zeiders, Pennsylvania Department of Education
Members of the Student Information System workgroup of the Schools Interoperability
Framework Association, including David Amidon, Barbara Andrepont, Judi Barnett, Barbara
Clements, Eric Creighton, Bill Duncan, Larry Fruth, Dean Goodmanson, Sue Pazurik, Wendy
Reidy, Jason Reimer, John Scholfeldt, Scott Schollenberger, and Elizabeth Wereley.
School district staff members in the Portland, Oregon area, including Rene Bishop, North
Clackamas School District; Helene Douglass, Multnomah Education Service District; Blair
Loudat, North Clackamas School District; Bonnie McCauley, Portland Public Schools; Carla
Randal, Portland Public Schools; Doug Salyers, North Clackamas SD; and Joe Suggs, Portland
Public Schools.
The following served members of the External Review Committee:
Judi Barnett, Central Susquehanna Intermediate Unit, representing the Schools Interoperability
Framework Association (SIFA);
Robert Bozick, Research Triangle Institute (RTI);
Janis Brown, U.S Department of Education, NCES;
Helene Douglass, Multnomah Education Service District;
David Grantz, Seaford Middle School, Seaford, Delaware;
Lisa Hudson, U.S Department of Education, Office of Career and Vocational Education;
Steven Ingels, Research Triangle Institute (RTI);
Stanley Legum, Westat;
Jeffrey Owings, U.S Department of Education, National Center of Education Statistics (NCES);
Rob Perkins, Westat;
Daniel Pratt, Research Triangle Institute (RTI);
Shep Roey, Westat;
Leslie Scott, American Institutes for Research (AIR);
Marlene Simon-Burroughs, U.S Department of Education, Office of Special Education;
Debra K. Sullivan, Principal, Charleston Catholic High School, Charleston, West Virginia; and
Lee Tack, Iowa Department of Education.

Special thanks are due to Graciela Thomen of Kforce Government Solutions, who prepared the
manuscript for publication and to Shelley Burns of NCES who led the final review effort.


vi

Contents
Page
Foreword ................................................................................................................................................... iii

Acknowledgments ...................................................................................................................................... v

List of Exhibits......................................................................................................................................... viii

Chapter 1. Introduction............................................................................................................................... 1

Chapter 2. Framework of SCED................................................................................................................. 7

Chapter 3. SCED Subject Areas ............................................................................................................... 11

Subject Area 1: English Language and Literature (secondary) ....................................................12

Subject Area 2: Mathematics (secondary) ....................................................................................22

Subject Area 3: Life and Physical Sciences (secondary) ..............................................................33

Subject Area 4: Social Sciences and History (secondary) ............................................................44

Subject Area 5: Fine and Performing Arts (secondary) ................................................................59

Subject Area 6: Foreign Language and Literature (secondary) 70

Subject Area 7: Religious Education and Theology (secondary) ...............................................126

Subject Area 8: Physical, Health, and Safety Education 129

Subject Area 9: Military Science ................................................................................................135

Subject Area 10: Computer and Information Sciences ...............................................................140

Subject Area 11: Communication and Audio/Visual Technology (secondary) .........................151

Subject Area 12: Business and Marketing (secondary) ..............................................................157

Subject Area 13: Manufacturing (secondary) .............................................................................167

Subject Area 14: Health Care Sciences (secondary) ..................................................................174

Subject Area 15: Public, Protective, and Government Services (secondary) .............................182

Subject Area 16: Hospitality and Tourism (secondary) ..............................................................187

Subject Area 17: Architecture and Construction (secondary) ....................................................193

Subject Area 18: Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources (secondary) ..................................201

Subject Area 19: Human Services (secondary) ..........................................................................211

Subject Area 20: Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics (secondary) ................................217

Subject Area 21: Engineering and Technology (secondary) ......................................................223

Subject Area 22: Miscellaneous (secondary) ..............................................................................230

Appendix A. Development of SCED...................................................................................................... 237

Appendix B. List of SCED Course Titles, in numeric order .................................................................. 247





vii

List of Exhibits
Exhibit Page
1. Course code structure: United States Government—Comprehensive.......................................9

2. Secondary subject areas and codes in the SCED.....................................................................11

A-1. Major characteristics of the Classification of Secondary School Courses (CSSC)

and the Pilot Standard National Course Classification System for Secondary

Education (SNCCS) ..............................................................................................................238

A-2. Developing the classification structure for School Codes for the Exchange of

Data (SCED): Interviews, meetings, and presentations ........................................................241

A-3. Developing the content for School Codes for the Exchange of Data (SCED):

Meetings and presentations....................................................................................................243

A-4. Course and course description reviews for School Codes for the Exchange of

Data (SCED)..........................................................................................................................244



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