A Handbook of the Boer War - With General Map of South Africa and 18 Sketch Maps and Plans
132 pages
English
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A Handbook of the Boer War - With General Map of South Africa and 18 Sketch Maps and Plans

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Tout savoir sur nos offres
132 pages
English

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Publié le 08 décembre 2010
Nombre de lectures 76
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 1 Mo

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Project Gutenberg's A Handbook of the Boer War, by Gale and Polden, Limited This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: A Handbook of the Boer War Author: Gale and Polden, Limited Release Date: April 24, 2005 [EBook #15699] Language: English Character set encoding: ASCII *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK A HANDBOOK OF THE BOER WAR *** Produced by Jonathan Ingram, David King, and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team A HANDBOOK OF THE BOER WAR With General Map of South Africa and 18 Sketch Maps and Plans GALE AND POLDEN LIMITED LONDON AND ALDERSHOT 1910 BUTLER & TANNER THE SELWOOD PRINTING WORKS FROME AND LONDON CONTENTS I PROLEGOMENA I The Roundheads of South Africa II Patriotism, Duty and Discipline III War considered as a Branch of Sport II THE NATAL WEDGE III DEUS EX MACHINA NO. I IV KIMBERLEY AND THE SIEGE OF RHODES V A TRAGEDY OF ERRORS VI MORE TUGELA TROUBLES VII LADYSMITH AT BAY VIII DEUS EX MACHINA NO. 2 IX ALARMS AND EXCURSIONS X BADEN-POWELL AND THE SIEGE OF MAFEKING XI BLOEMFONTEIN TO PRETORIA XII THE NEW COLONY XIII NEC CELER NEC AUDAX XIV THE TAMING OF THE TRANSVAAL XV THE RECURRENCES OF DE WET XVI LORD KITCHENER AT WORK XVII THE MECHANICAL PHASE I Orange River Colony II Eastern Transvaal III Western Transvaal IV Cape Colony XVIII THE END COMMANDERS OF DIVISIONS AND BRIGADES INDEX OF PERSONS AND PLACES SKETCH MAPS AND PLANS1 Northern Natal Modder River and Magersfontein Stormberg Colenso Spion Kop and Vaalkrantz Spion Kop Final Advance on Ladysmith Siege of Ladysmith Riet and Modder Drifts Paardeberg Poplar Grove and Driefontein Sannah's Post Magaliesberg District Diamond Hill Brandwater Basin Orange Free State Southern Transvaal Noitgedacht Nek General Map of South Africa—at the beginning. Footnote 1:(return) The thanks of the Author are due to the Army Council for permission to copy the maps and plans in the Official History of the War, and to L.S. Amery, Esq., for permission to copy the plans in the fifth volume of the Times History of the War. PREFATORY NOTE The author has endeavoured in this Handbook to compile, for the use of students and others, a general account of the various phases of the Boer War of 1899-1902, in which he served for twenty-six months. With some exceptions, every statement of fact relating to the military operations may be verified in one or more of the following publications— The "Times" History of the War; The War Office Official History of the War; The Minutes of Evidence taken before the Royal Commission of Inquiry into the War. To the two Histories, which have been but recently completed, the Author is much indebted. Other authorities have, however, been consulted. The Sketch Maps and Plans of certain areas and battlefields are only intended to give, by means of a few hachures, contours, and form-lines, a general impression of topographical features. The Author has from time to time in the course of the narrative indicated what he believes to have been the chief causes of the prolongation of the War:— The inefficacy of modern Tactics as a means of dealing with partisan warfare; The moral reinforcement derived from a confident belief in the justice of a cause, by which the enemy was continually encouraged to persevere; The reluctance of the British leaders to fight costly battles; The constitutional inability of the British Officer to take War seriously; The waste of British horses due to inexpert Horsemastership. May, 1910. {1} CHAPTER I Prolegomena I. THE ROUNDHEADS OF SOUTH AFRICA History often reproduces without reference to nationality some particular human type or class which becomes active and predominant for a time, and fades away when its task is finished. It is, however, not utterly lost, for the germ of it lies dormant yet ready to re-appear when the exigencies of the moment recall it. The reserve forces of human nature are inexhaustible and inextinguishable. It is probable that few of the Boers had ever heard of Oliver Cromwell, or that his life and times had ever been studied in the South African Republics, and had influenced the Boer action; yet the affinity of the South African burghers of the XIXth century with the Puritans and the Roundheads of the XVIIth is striking. It was not so much a parallelism of aims and hopes, for the struggle in England was political and not national as in South Africa, as of temperament, character, and method. There was hardly an individuity in the Boers of the War which might not have been found in the followers of Cromwell. Like these they were fanatically but sincerely religious, and their unabashed and fearless adherence to their beliefs and their open observance of the outward forms of religion exposed them to the same cruel and baseless charge of hypocrisy. Just as the aristocratic followers of Charles I had jeered at the Roundheads, so did every thoughtless officer and newspaper correspondent jeer at the psalm-singing and the prayer meetings in the laagers. The Boers had the courage of their religious opinions, and were not ashamed to proclaim them in the face of man. The Bible was the only book they knew, and they guided themselves according to their lights by its precepts. In opposing the English they believed that they were resisting the enemies of the Almighty. Like the Puritans they honestly thought that certain passages in the Holy Scriptures applied to them as the Chosen People, and that they were assured of Divine Protection; and if they erred in their exegesis their delusion at least deserves respect. Yet all the while the Old Testament was the volume they chiefly studied, and if they quoted the New Testament they sometimes modified the context to their own advantage. Each Puritan movement has derived its strength not so much from its abstract merit as from the intense personal conviction felt by each unit engaged in it, that the righteousness of the cause was unassailable. The Puritan never wavered in philosophic doubt. No misgivings disturbed his soul, and he pursued his object with all the strength of his body. The Puritan stir in the reign of Charles I was a revival, almost a continuation, of the half political, half religious activity which in the previous century had effected the Reformation. The Boer movement in South Africa, which sprang up after a germination lasting three generations, was brought about by a recrudescence of the spirit which made the Boers of the Netherlands