A Prisoner of Morro - In the Hands of the Enemy
95 pages
English
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A Prisoner of Morro - In the Hands of the Enemy

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95 pages
English

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Publié le 08 décembre 2010
Nombre de lectures 48
Langue English

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The Project Gutenberg eBook, A Prisoner of Morro, by Upton Sinclair This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: A Prisoner of Morro In the Hands of the Enemy Author: Upton Sinclair Release Date: March 6, 2008 [eBook #24770] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 ***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK A PRISONER OF MORRO*** E-text prepared by Steven desJardins and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team (http://www.pgdp.net) Transcriber's Note: "Ensign Clark Fitch" is a pseudonym used by Upton Sinclair. A Prisoner of Morro OR In the Hands of the Enemy By ENSIGN CLARK FITCH, U. S. N. Author of "Bound for Annapolis," "Cliff, the Naval Cadet," "The Fighting Squadron," etc. STREET & SMITH, PUBLISHERS 79-89 SEVENTH AVE., NEW YORK CITY Copyright, 1898 By STREET & SMITH APrisoner of Morro TABLE OF CONTENTS I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. XII. XIII. XIV. XV. XVI. XVII. XVIII. XIX. XX. XXI. XXII. XXIII. XXIV. XXV. XXVI. XXVII. XXVIII. XXIX. XXX. XXXI. XXXII. XXXIII. SIGHTING A PRIZE. A LONG CHASE. AN OLD ENEMY . IN COMMAND OF THE PRIZE. A HAIL FROM THE DARKNESS. REPELLING BOARDERS. A DESPERATE CHASE. A DASH FOR THE SHORE. THE ENEMY'S COUNTRY . A STARTLING DISCOVERY . A RUNNING FIGHT. THE FIRST PRISONERS OF WAR. IGNACIO'S PLOTS. BESSIE STUART. IN MORRO CASTLE. IN THE DUNGEON VAULTS. OUT OF THE DUNGEON. CLIF FARADAY'S SACRIFICE. A FAREWELL. AN UNEXPECTED PERIL. RECAPTURED BY THE ENEMY . CUTTING A CABLE. A PERILOUS DETAIL. THE CUBAN COURIER. "IN THE NAME OF HUMANITY AND THE SAILORS OF THE MAINE!" A GAME OF BLUFF. IN WHICH CLIF MEETS WITH A SURPRISE. A STRUGGLE AGAINST ODDS. CLIF'S SECOND EXPEDITION. THE BATTLE IN THE BRUSH. CAPTURED. CLIF FARADAY'S TEST. THE MYSTERY OF THE UNEXPLODED SHELL. 5 10 19 28 32 39 46 51 56 63 67 72 78 85 94 99 104 112 120 127 133 139 146 152 158 164 170 176 182 187 194 201 208 A PRISONER OF MORRO CHAPTER I. SIGHTING A PRIZE. About noon of a day in May during the recent year the converted tug Uncas left Key West to join the blockading squadron off the northern coast of Cuba. Her commander was Lieutenant Raymond, and her junior officer Naval Cadet Clifford Faraday. The regular junior officer was absent on sick leave, and Cadet Faraday had been assigned to his place in recognition of gallant conduct. The ropes were cast off, and slowly the tug glided away from the dock and out toward the open sea. It was not very long before the harbor of Key West was left behind, and then began the long trip to Havana. It was over a hundred miles, and that meant seven or eight hours' journey for the Uncas. But the Uncas was a good, stout vessel, unusually swift for a tug, and she made the water fairly fly when once she got clear of the land. Clif leaned against one of the rapid-firing guns in the bow and gazed longingly ahead; he was anxious to reach his destination. There were wild rumors concerning Spanish fleets, Cadiz squadrons and Cape Verde squadrons and Mediterranean squadrons, which were continually being sighted or heard of nearby; and for all Clif knew the decisive battle of the war might be fought at any time. And he felt that if it took place while he was absent he would never cease to regret it as long as he lived. The Uncas could not do much in such a battle; but she was anxious to do her share. It was possible, also, that Morro might succeed in provoking an attack. The guns of the Havana defenses kept blazing away at anything that came near, and the American sailors were fairly boiling over with impatience to get a whack at them. And at any time Admiral Sampson might give the word. So Clif was restless and impatient as he stood in the bow of the swift tug and gazed southward. It was a rather damp place of observation the cadet had chosen, for it had been blowing quite a gale that day, and the Uncas was plowing her way through a heavy sea. The spray was flying over the decks; but who would have thought of going below at such a time as that? It was not Clif's turn on duty. Lieutenant Raymond seemed to think that after his struggle on board the Spanish monitor the young cadet deserved a rest. But he was too eager and wide awake just then to wish to take it. When the tug was well under way the lieutenant came out of the pilot house and joined Clif again. "Thinking of the weather, Mr. Faraday?" inquired Lieutenant Raymond. "No, sir," replied the cadet, "I was thinking of Ignacio. I don't know how he happened to get into my thoughts, but he did." "Who is Ignacio?" "He's a Spaniard I've had some trouble with," answered Clif. "You may have heard about one of his exploits." "Which one is that?" "He made an attempt to assassinate Rear Admiral Sampson." "Oh, yes, I heard about that," said the officer. "The admiral told me about it himself. I believe you were the person who interfered." "I had the good luck to be standing near," said Clif, modestly. "And of course, I sprang between them." "And the spy stabbed you?" "Yes. In the shoulder, but he did not hurt me very much." "He must be a desperate man." "He is. That stabbing business seems to be a favorite trick of his. I hope I shan't have to face him again." Whether Ignacio was a Spaniard or a traitor Cuban, no one could say. Clif had first met him trying to lead astray an American officer who had been sent with dispatches for Gomez. And Clif had foiled the plot, and had been Ignacio's deadly enemy ever since. Clif had been keeping a careful watch for him. He knew that the vindictive fellow would follow his every move; Ignacio was acting as a spy for the Spaniards, and so must have found it easy to keep track of the cadet's whereabouts. But so far Clif had not met him. "We are likely to have a wild night of it," said Lieutenant Raymond. "The clouds seem to get darker every minute." "It'll be a night for the blockade-runners," was Clif's answer. "We may have some excitement." "We'll have it anyway," said the other. "I don't know of
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