Astounding Stories of Super-Science July 1930
22 pages
English

Astounding Stories of Super-Science July 1930

-

Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres
22 pages
English
Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres

Informations

Publié par
Publié le 08 décembre 2010
Nombre de lectures 63
Langue English

Exrait

Project Gutenberg's Astounding Stories of Super-Science July 1930, by Various This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: Astounding Stories of Super-Science July 1930 Author: Various Editor: Harry Bates Release Date: June 23, 2009 [EBook #29198] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK ASTOUNDING STORIES, JULY 1930 *** Produced by Greg Weeks and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
ASTOUNDING STORIES OF SUPER-SCIENCE 20¢ On Sale the First Thursday of Each Month W .M. CLAYTON ,Pubilsher HARRY BATES, Editor DR. DOUGLAS M. DOLD, Consulting Editor The Clayton Standard on a Magazine Guarantees That  the stories therein are clean, interesitng ,vivid, by leading wtirers of the day and purchased unde rconditions approved by the Authors 'League of Ameirca; Tha  t such magazines are manufactured in Union shops by American workmen; That  each newsdeale rand agent isi nsured af ai rprofti; Tha  t ani nteillgen tcensorship guardst hei radvetrising pages. The othe rClayton magaiznes are : ACE-HIGH MAGAZINE, RANCH ROMANCES, COWBOY STORIES, CLUES, FIVE-NOVELS MONTHLY, ALL STAR DETECTIVE STORIES, RANGELAND LOVE STORY MAGAZINE, WESTERN ADVENTURES, and FOREST AND STREAM. Moret han Two Mliilon Copies Requiredt o Supply the Monthly Demandf o rClayton Magaiznes. VOL .,III No. 1CONTENTSJULY ,1930  Painted Scene in COVER DESIGN "Earth ,thi en  MWaartaeur-dceorl."ors rfom a   BEYOND THE HEAVISIDE LAYER CAPT. S. P. MEEK 5 For Eighty Veitrca lMlies Carpenter and Bond Blasted Their Way —Only to Be Trapped by the Extraordinary Monsters of the  Heaviside Laye.r  EMAARRTAUH,D TEHREARTHUR J .BURKS 18 Out of Her Orbi tSpedt he Teeming EatrhA Marauding Planet Bent on Starry Conquest.  (Beginning a Three-patr Novel.)  AMBER BFLROOCMK AN TOM CURRY 50 A Giant Amber Block at Last Gives Up Its Living, Ravenous Prey.   THE TERRXOR OF AIR- HARL VINCENT 62 LEVEL SI From Some Far Reach o fLeagueless Space Came a Grea tPlliar o fFlame to Lay Waste and Terroirzet he Eatrh.  (A Novelet.)  THE FORGOTTEN PLANET SEWELL PEASLEE WRIGHT 88 The Authenitc Account of Why Cosmic Man Damned an Oultaw Wolrdt o Be, Forever, a Lepe ro fSpace.   GTLHOE RPYOWER AND THECHARLES W. DIFFIN 104 Sadly ,Sternly,t he Old Professo rReveals to His Brililan tPupit lhe Greater Path to Glory.  MURDER MADNESS MURRAY LEINSTER 109 More and More South Ameircans Are Sirtcken wtih the Horrible "Murder Madness" Tha tLiesi nt he Maste'rs Feafrul Poison. And Bell Is Their One Las tHope as He Fights to Stem the Swiflty Rising Tide of a Continent's Utter Enslavement. (Patr Three of a Four-par tNove.l)  THE READERS' ALL OF US 134 CORNER More and More South Ameircans Are Stircken wtiht he Horirble "Murder Madness" Tha tLies int he Maste'rs Feafrul Poison. And Bell Is Their One Last Hope as He Fightst o Stem the Swfilty Rising Tide o fa Continen'ts Utte rEnslavement. (Par tThree of a Four-pa trNove.l) Single Copies, 20 Cents (In Canada, 25 Cents) Yearly Subscripiton ,$2.00 Issued monthly by Publishers' Fiscal Corporation, 80 Lafayette S.t, New York ,N ..Y W .M. Clayton, President: Nathan Goldmann, Secretary. Entered as second-class matter Decembe r7 ,1929 ,at the Post Office a tNew York, N ..Y ,unde rAct of March 3, 1879 .Tltier egistered as a Trade Mark in the U .S. Patent Office. Member Newsstand Group—Men's Lis .tFo radvetrising rates address E. R. Crowe & Co. ,Inc,. 25 Vanderblit Ave. ,New York; o r225 Notrh Michigan Ave. ,Chicago. Beyond the Heaviside Layer By Capt S. P. Meek
They were moving sluggishly alongt he red ilght, seeming to flow rather than craw.l M c Q UAREIR t ,he City Edtior,l ooked up as  Ientered his office. "Bond", he asked, "doyou know Jim Carpenter?"  " Iknow him silghtly", Ir epiled cautiousl .y"I have met him severait lmes and Ii nterviewed him some years ago when he improvedt he Hadley rocket motor. I can' tclaim a very extensive acquaintance with him". "I thought you knew him weltI .l is a surprise to me tof ind tha ttherei s any prominen tman whoi s no tan especial rfiend o fyours .At any rate you know him as we llas anyone o fthe sta,ff so Il'l give you the assignmen.t" "What's he up to now?" I asked. For eighty veritca lmiles "He's going to rty to punch a holei n the heavisidel ayer". Carpenter and Bond "But tha'tsi mpossible",I  cried ."How cananyone" blastedt hrie wayonly  .. .. to be trapped by the exrtaordinary monsters My voice died away in slience .True enough ,the idea o ftrying to make a ot fhe heaivside laye.r permanent hole in a field of magnetic force was absurd, but even as I spoke I remembered that Jim Carpenter had never agreed to the opinion almost unanimously held by our scienitsts ast ot he true nature o fthe heaviside layer. "tI may be impossible," repiled McQuarire dryly ,but you are no thired by this paper as a scienitifc " consultant. For some reason, God alone knows why, the owner thinks that you are a reporter. Get down there andt ryt o prove he is righ tby digging up a few facts abou tCarpente'rs attemp.t Wire your stuff in and Peavey wi llwirtei t up. On this one occasion ,please rty to concea lyou rerudition and sendi n your story in simple words o fone syllable which uneducated men ilke Peavey and me can comprehend. Tha'ts all." H inEt etruvrineewd  watigha imn y tfoa chies  bdurensikn ga ,nbdu  t IlMecf tQtuhaer irreo'os mv.i tirAot l oslnied t iomffe  m Iew liokuled  whaatvee r oco ffam ed ufrcok'ms  bsaucckh.  aHne didn't really mean hal fo fwhat he said ,and he knew as wel las I did that his crack about my holding my job with the Clairon as a matter of pul lwas grossly unjus.t I tis true that I knew Tirmble, the owne rof the Clarion, fairly wel,l but I go tmy job wtihout any aid rfom him .McQuarrie himself hired me and I held my job because he hadn t'ifred me ,desptiet he causticr emarks which he addressed to me.I  had madet he mistake when  Iifrs tgot on the pape rof letting McQuarire knowt ha t Iwas a graduate electrical engineer rfom Leland University ,and he had held i tagainst me from that day on. I dont' know whethe rhe really held i tseriously agains tme or not, bu twhat I have wirtten above is a fai rsample o fhis usual manner toward me. In point o ffact I had grealty minimized the exten tof my acquaintance wtih Jim Carpenter . Ihad beeni n Leland a tthe same itme tha the was and had known him qutie well. When I graduated ,which was two years afte rhe did, I worked for about a yea rin his laborator ,yand my knowledge of the improvement which had madet he Hadley rocke tmoto ra practicabiltiy came rfomf irst hand knowledge and not from an interview. That was several years before but I knew that he never forgot an acquaintance, let alone a firend, and whlie  Ihad letf him tot ake up othe rwork ou rparting had been pleasant ,and  Ilooked forward wtihr ea lpleasuret o seeing him again. J IMH eC warapse pntreorba, btlhye  asst ordmeey pplye rtveelr soef dm iond tehren  tshceieornyc eo!f  Telheec erttiecirtny alai ncdo npohcylsaiscta: t lhceh epmeirspteryt uaas l oapnpyo nmeannt! ailve ,bu tit pleased him to pose as a "pracitca"l man who knew nex tto nothing o ftheory and who despised the ilttle he did know. His great deilgh twas to expeirmentally smash the most beautfiully consrtucted theories which were advanced and taughti n the colleges and universities oft he wolrd ,and when he couldn t'smash them by experimenta levidence, to attack them rfom the standpoin tof phliosophical reasoning and to twist around the data on which they were built and make ti prove ,or seem to prove ,the exac toppostie o fwhat was generally accepted. No one quesitoned his abiltiy. When the lif-lated Hadley had first consrtucted the rocket motor which bears his name ti was Jim Carpenter who made i tpracitca .lHadley had tired to disintegrate lead in order to get his back thrust from the atomic energy which it contained and proved by apparently unimpeachable mathematics thal tead was the only substance which could be used. Jim Carpenter had snorted through the pages of the electircal journals and had turned out a modfiication o fHadley's invention which disintegrated aluminum .The main difference in performance was that ,whlie Hadley's oirgina lmotor would not develop enough powe rto lfi ttisel frfom the ground, Carpente'rs modiifcaiton produced twenty itmest he horsepowe rpe rpound o fweigh to fany previously known generator of power and changedt he rocket ship rfom a wild dream to an everyday commonplace. W HCEaNrp eHnatedlr eyw hloa treid riccoulnesdrt tuhctee idd ehai s ofs pthae caett eflmyep r tbaenidn gp rsoupcocseessdf utlo . Hvies ipt rtohpeo smeod otnh ,e n tiowvaes l aJnidm weirdi deat hat the path to space was no topen ,butt ha tthe eatrh andt he atmosphere were enclosed in a hollow sphere o fimpenertable substance through which Hadley's space lfye rcould no tpass. How accurate were his prognostications was soon known to everyone. Hadley buli tand equipped his lfyer and statred off on what he hoped would be an epoch making ilfght . tIwas one ,bu tnoi tnt he way which he had hoped .His ship took off readliy enough ,being powered with fou rrocke tmotors working on Carpenter's pirnciple ,and rose to a height of about ffity mlies ,gaining veloctiy rapidl .yA ttha tpoint his velocity suddenly began to drop. He was in constant radio communication with the earth and her epotred his difficulty .Carpenter advised him to turn back while he could, but Hadley kept on. Slower and slower became his progress, and after he had penetrated ten milesi ntot he substance which hindered him, his ship stuckf as.tI nstead of using his bow motors and trying to back ou ,the had moved them to the rear ,and with the combined force of his four motors he had penertated fo ranothe rtwo mlies .There he insanely tried to force his motors to dirve him on unti lhis fue lwas exhausted. He had lived fo rove ra yeari n his space flye,r but all o fhis efforts did not servet o mateirally change his postiion. He had irted ,o fcourse, to go out through his air locks and explore space ,bu this strength, even although aided by powefru llevers ,could not open the oute rdoors o fthe locks agains tthe force which was holding them shut. Carefu lobservaitons were continuously made o fthe postiion of his flyer andi  twasf ound that it was gradually returningt owardt he eatrh. Its motion was very slight ,not enough to give any hope fo rthe occupant .Statring rfom a moiton so slow that it could hardly be detected ,the velocity of return gradually accelerated; and three years atfer Hadley's death, the lfye rwas suddenly released from the force which heldti  ,andi t plunged tot he eatrh,t o be reduced byt he force ofti sf allt o at wisted ,piitfu lmass o funrecognizablej unk. T wHaEs  rseeimzaeidn su pwoenr eb yet xhaem isncieedn ,itasntsd  tohet f hier own ostlred eal npda atrst  hweeorrey  fwoausn db tuo  tlibuep  hoig fahl ym magangentiectizf ieedld . Tofhif so rfcaect surrounding the earth through which nothing of a magneitc nature could pass .This theory received almost universal acceptance, Jim Carpenter alone of the more prominent men of learning refusing to admti the vaildity o fi.t He gravely stated ti as his belie fthat no magneitc ifeld existed, but tha tthe heaviside layer was composed o fsome liquid o fhigh viscosity whose denstiy and consequent resistance to the passage of a body through it increased in the ratio of the square of the distance to which one penertatedi nto .ti There was a moment of stunned surprise when he announced his radical idea, and then a burst of Jovian laughter shook the scientiifc press .Carpenter was in his glory. For months he waged a btiter controversy in the scientfiic journals and when he falied to win convetrs by this method ,he announced tha the would prove it by blasitng a wayi nto space through the heaviside laye,r a thing which would be patenltyi mpossible were ti af ield off orce .He had lapsedi nto sliencef ort wo years and his cur tnotet o the Associated Press to the effect that he was now ready to demonsrtate his expeirment was the first intimation the world had received of his progress. I DtoR aE hWoetexp laennds ea t moonncee yc arflolemd  thCea rcpaesnhtiee r roannt dh ebot ealredpehdo tnhee. Lark fo rLos Angeles .WhenI  arrived I went "Jim Carpenter speaking," came his voice presentl.y "Good evening, M.r Carpente,r" r Ieplied ,"this is Bond oft he San Francisco Clarion". I would be ashamed to repea tthe language which came ove rtha ttelephone.  Iwas informed that all repotrers were pests and that  Iwas a doubly obnoxious specimen and that were I wtihin reach  Iwould be promplty assaulted and that reporters would be received at nine the nex tmorning and no ealrie ror later. "Just a minute ,Mr .Carpente,r"  Icired as he neared the end of his peroraiton and was, I fancied, about to slam up the receiver. "Don't you remember me? I was at Leland with you and used to work in your laboratory in the atomic disintegraiton section" . "Wha'ts you rname?" he demanded. "Bond, M.r Carpenter" . "Oh, Firs tMotrgage! Certainlyr I emembe ryou .Mighty glad to hear you rvoice .How are you?" "Fine,t hank you ,M.r Carpenter .I would not have venturedt o call you had  Ino tknown you I .didn't mean to impose andI l' lbe gladt o see you int he morning a tnine." "No tby al ong sho,t" he cired." You'll come up right away. Where are you staying?" "Att he El Rey". "Wel,l check ou tand come right up here. There'sl ots o froom for you here a tthe plan tandI l'l be gladt o have you . Iwant at leas tone intelilgen trepor tof this experiment and you should be able to write ti .I'll look for you in an hour." "I don' twant toi mpose"I  began ;bu the interrupted. "Nonsense, glad to have you .I needed someone ilke you badly and you have come just in the nick of itme .'Il lexpec tyoui n an hour." T HloEo kriencge ifvoer.r  tIct liocokke dm yat nadx i  Iahaslttil tee noevde t roa nf ohlloouwr  thoi sg eitn stortut hceit oCnasr. pAe nritnegrl saidbeo rsateoarty  waansd jI  ucsh tuwckhlaet dI  wwhaesn t Ihought of how McQuarire's face wouldl ook when he saw my expense account .Presently we reached the edge o fthe grounds which surroundedt he Carpenter laboratory and were stopped at the high gateI remembered so we.ll "Are you sure you'll get in, buddy?" asked my dirve.r "Certainl",y r Iepiled" .What made you ask?" "I've brought three chaps out here to-day and none o fthem got in," he answered wtih a girn. "I'm glad you're so sure, bu tl'Ij lus twa tiaround until you arei nside before  Idrive away".  Ilaughed and advanced to the gate .Tim ,the old guard, was sitll there, and he remembered and welcomed me. "Me ordhers wuz t 'let yez roigh tin ,so",r he said as he greeted me ."Jist lave ye'e rbag here and Oil'l have ut sintr oigh tup".
[Pg 5]
[Pg 6]
[Pg 7]
[Pg 8]
I dropped my bag and rtudged up the well remembered path to the laboratory .It had been enlarged somewhat since I saw til as tand,l ate thought he hour was, there was a busltei nt he ai rand  Icould see a number o fmen working in the buliding. From an area in the rear, which was lighted by huge lfood lights, camet he staccato tattoo of a rivete.rI  walked up to the front oft hel aboratory and entered .I knew the wayt o Carpenter's office and I wen tdirectly there and knocked. "Hello, First Mortgage!" cired Jim Carpente ras  Ientered in response to his ca .ll"'Im glad to see you. Excuse the bruskness of my first greeitng to you over the telephone, but the press have been deviling me all day, every man jack of them trying to steal a march on the rest. I am going to open the whole shebang at nine to-morrow and give them all an equal chance to look things over before I turn the curren ton at noon. As soon as we have a ilttle cha,t'I ll show you ovet rhe works." A pFlaTcEe R ohvaelf r aann dh oI'ull r'esx cplhaain t heevr eorsyteh.i n"gC .ofIm me ya liodnega, s Fiwrsor tkM oorut,tg aygoeu", ll' hhae svaei dn ,o" wceh'all ngcoe  otout  gaon dol voeo rki tt htoe-morrow, so I want you to see it now." I had no chance to ask him what he meant by this remark, for he walked rapidly from the laboratory and I perforce followed him .He led the way to the patch o filghted ground behind the buliding where the riveting machine was stlil beaitng outti s monotonous cacaphony and paused by the first of a series of huger elfectors ,which were arrangedi n a circle. "Here ist he statr oft het hing", he said. "There aret wo hundred and fifty of these relfectors arranged in a circle four hundred yards in diamete .rEach of them i