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The Sunbeam and the Captive

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Les contes d'Andersen font partie de l'imaginaire collectif. Les œuvres de Hans Christian Handersen traversent les âges et les générations sans prendre une ride, ses récits sont classés comme des œuvres indémodables, intergénérationnelles et presque intemporelles. Youscribe vous propose de plonger dans un univers fascinant mêlant le rêve, l'émotion et le suspense avec près de 140 histoires de légende telle que la princesse au petit pois, la petite sirène, le vilain petit canard et bien plus encore ! Il ne tient qu'à vous d'entrer dans ce monde merveilleux et palpitant...
Hans Christian Handersen fairy tales are considered to be a necessary and inevitable passage in literature’s general culture/knowledge. Andersen’s work has always been an inspiration for children and grown up’s, his imagination and the relevance of his stories made him an author whose legacy will remain through ages and generation. With almost 140 legendary tales such as The Princess and The Pea, The Little Mermaid and The ugly Duckling, Youscribe invites you to /consult, download and read through the great mind of the legendary Danish author. So feel free to come and discover this fabulous and thrilling world
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The Sunbeam and the Captive
Hans Christian Andersen
I
t
is autumn. We stand on the ramparts, and look out over the sea. We look at the numerous ships,
and at the Swedish coast on the opposite side of the sound, rising far above the surface of the
waters which mirror the glow of the evening sky. Behind us the wood is sharply defined; mighty
trees surround us, and the yellow leaves flutter down from the branches. Below, at the foot of the
wall, stands a gloomy looking building enclosed in palisades.The space between is dark and narrow,
but still more dismal must it be behind the iron gratings in the wall which cover the narrow loopholes
or windows, for in these dungeons the most depraved of the criminals are confined. A ray of the
setting sun shoots into the bare cells of one of the captives, for God’s sun shines upon the evil and
the good.The hardened criminal casts an impatient look at the bright ray.Then a little bird flies
towards the grating, for birds twitter to the just as well as to the unjust. He only cries, “Tweet,
tweet,” and then perches himself near the grating, flutters his wings, pecks a feather from one of
them, puffs himself out, and sets his feathers on end round his breast and throat.The bad, chained
man looks at him, and a more gentle expression comes into his hard face. In his breast there rises a
thought which he himself cannot rightly analyze, but the thought has some connection with the
sunbeam, with the bird, and with the scent of violets, which grow luxuriantly in spring at the foot of
the wall.Then there comes the sound of the hunter’s horn, merry and full.The little bird starts, and
flies away, the sunbeam gradually vanishes, and again there is darkness in the room and in the heart
of that bad man. Still the sun has shone into that heart, and the twittering of the bird has touched it.
Sound on, ye glorious strains of the hunter’s horn; continue your stirring tones, for the evening is
mild, and the surface of the sea, heaving slowly and calmly, is smooth as a mirror.
(1847) - EnglishTranslation: H. P. Paull (1872) - Original Illustrations by Vilhelm Pedersen and Lorenz Frølich