Getting Acquainted with the Trees

Getting Acquainted with the Trees

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Project Gutenberg's Getting Acquainted with the Trees, by J. Horace McFarlandThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: Getting Acquainted with the TreesAuthor: J. Horace McFarlandRelease Date: May 12, 2009 [EBook #28764]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK GETTING ACQUAINTED WITH THE TREES ***Produced by Marilynda Fraser-Cunliffe and the OnlineDistributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.netGetting Acquainted with the TreesBYJ. HORACE McFARLANDIllustrated from Photographs by the AuthorNEW YORK THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 1914Copyright, 1904By The Outlook CompanyPublished April, 1904Reprinted April, 1904New edition September, 1906Reprinted August, 1913 March, 1914.ForewordThese sketches are, I fear, very unscientific and unsystematic. They record the growth of my own interest andinformation, as I have recently observed and enjoyed the trees among which I had walked unseeing far too manyyears. To pass on, as well as I can, some of the benefit that has come into my own life from this wakened interest inthe trees provided by the Creator for the resting of tired brains and the healing of ruffled spirits, as well as for utility, isthe reason for gathering together and somewhat extending the papers that have brought me, as ...

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Project Gutenberg's Getting Acquainted with the Trees, by J. Horace McFarland This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: Getting Acquainted with the Trees Author: J. Horace McFarland Release Date: May 12, 2009 [EBook #28764] Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK GETTING ACQUAINTED WITH THE TREES ***
Produced by Marilynda Fraser-Cunliffe and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
Getting Acquainted with the Trees
BY
J. HORACE McFARLAND
Illustrated from Photographs by the Author
NEW YORK THE MACMILLAN COMPANY 1914 Copyright, 1904 By The Outlook Company
Published April, 1904 Reprinted April, 1904 New edition September, 1906 Reprinted August, 1913 March, 1914.
Foreword
These sketches are, I fear, very unscientific and unsystematic. They record the growth of my own interest and information, as I have recently observed and enjoyed the trees among which I had walked unseeing far too many years. To pass on, as well as I can, some of the benefit that has come into my own life from this wakened interest in the trees provided by the Creator for the resting of tired brains and the healing of ruffled spirits, as well as for utility, is the reason for gathering together and somewhat extending the papers that have brought me, as they have appeared in the pages of "The Outlook," so many letters of fellowship and appreciation from others who have often seen more clearly and deeply into the woods than I may hope to. Driven out from my desk by weariness sometimes—and as often, I confess, by a rasped temper I would fain hide from display—I have never failed to find rest, and peace, and much to see and to love, among the common and familiar trees, to which I hope these mere hints of some of their features not always seen may send others who also need their silent and beneficent message.
March 17, 1904
J. H. McF.
A Sotry o fSoem Maple
The Growth of the Oak Pines Apples Willows and Poplars The Elm and the Tulip Nut-bearing Trees Some Other Trees Index Botanical Names
s
Contents
1 25 49 73 95 131 157 185 235 239
List of Illustrations Silver maple flowers4 Young leaves of the red maple7 "The Norway maple breaks into a wonderful bloom"9 Samaras of the sugar maple11 A mature sycamore maple13 Sycamore maple blossoms15 Flowers of the ash-leaved maple17 Ash-leaved maples in bloom19 Striped maple21 The swamp white oak in winter29 Flowers of the pin-oak31 The swamp white oak in early spring36 An old post-oak39 A blooming twig of the swamp white oak41 Acorns of the English oak47 A lone pine on the Indian river53 Hemlock Hill, Arnold Arboretum56 The long-leaved pines of the South61 Fountain-like effect of the young long-leaved pines62 An avenue of white pines67 Cones of the white spruce71 An apple orchard in winter78 When the apple trees blossom81 The Spectabilis crab in bloom84 Fruits of the wild crab87 The beauty of a fruiting apple branch91 Bloom of double-flowering apple94 A weeping willow in early spring100 The weeping willow in a storm103 A pussy-willow in a park106 Blooms of the white willow108 A white willow in a characteristic position112 Clump of young white willows116 White poplars in spring-time119 Carolina poplar as a street tree123 Winter aspect of the cottonwood126 Lombardy poplar129 A mature American elm136 The delicate tracery of the American elm in winter139 The English elm in winter143 Winter effect of tulip trees148 A great liriodendron in bloom150 Flowers of the liriodendron153 The wide-spreading black walnut162 The American sweet chestnut in winter165 Sweet chestnut blooms167 The chinquapin170 A shagbark hickory in bloom173 The true nut-eater178 The American beech in winter180 The witch-hazel181 Sweet birch in spring191 Yellow birches192 Flowers of the spice-bush194 Leaves and berries of the American holly195
olar91F6tnnoT ere at treollyan hciremAe Th17e2amidqulieht fo tromacys  fru andf thit o02hTab2rvase eele Thpapainw lo bil ediuqabma222rthe papaw227The mo22F6olewsro  f2emit gnitiurf n ieetrn moimrspe43su2hecb-s ip thes ofrrie31Becast lrbniovo  res olucre dof th991doowg-der ehT bind bu1B20omloolmo sfot ehs ahd-bush206Flowers fo  ehtremAnaciin ln2deTh07Ame n209indean lericehb fot re slFwoYo11t2usoc lcklaeht fo seert gnuocust212 black lomer ,rohT eysacllba5B21ut bn-toslliurfottuab-n
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Young leaves of the red mapleYoung leaves of the red maple The leaves of the red maple—it is also the swamp maple of some localities—as they open to the coaxing of April sun and April showers, have a special charm. They are properly red, but mingled with the characteristic color is a whole palette of tints of soft yellow, bronze and apricot. As the little baby leaflets open, they are shiny and crinkly, and altogether attractive. One thinks of the more aristocratic and dwarfed Japanese maples, in looking at the opening of these red-brown beauties, and it is no pleasure to see them smooth out into sedate greenness. Again, in fall, a glory of color comes to the leaves of the red maple; for they illumine the countryside with their scarlet hue, and, as they drop, form a brilliant thread in the most beautiful of all carpets—that of the autumn leaves. I think no walk in the really happy days of the fall maturity of growing things is quite so pleasant as that which leads one to shuffle through this deep forest floor covering of oriental richness of hue.
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