Heart Talks

Heart Talks

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Heart Talks by Charles Wesley Naylor This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at http://www.gutenberg.org/license Title: Heart Talks Author: Charles Wesley Naylor Release Date: May 9, 2009 [Ebook 28736] Language: English ***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK HEART TALKS*** Heart Talks A Volume of Confidential Talks on the Problems, Privileges, and Duties of the Christian Life, Designed to Comfort, Encourage, Strengthen and Instruct by C. W. Naylor 1922 Reprinted 1982 by Faith Publishing House Guthrie, Oklahoma Contents Concerning The Author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reprint Publisher's Foreword (February, 1982) . Talk One. What It Means To Trust The Lord . . . Talk Two. The Blessing Of Dissatisfaction . . . . Talk Three. Why I Believe The Old Book . . . . Talk Four. He Maketh Me To Lie Down . . . . . Talk Five. Blighted Blossoms . . . . . . . . . . . Talk Six. Meeting The Lions . . . . . . . . . . . Talk Seven. Egg-Shell Christians . . . . . . . . . Talk Eight. Two Ways Of Seeing . . . . . . . . . Talk Nine. The Living Bible . . . . . . . . . . . Talk Ten. Heeding Intuitional Warnings . . . . . Talk Eleven. Doing Something Worth While . . . Talk Twelve. Home-Made Clouds . . . . . . . . Talk Thirteen. It Pleased The Lord To Bruise Him Talk Fourteen. Putting Clouds Over The Sun . . . Talk Fifteen. What Is Your Word Worth? . . . . Talk Sixteen. How To Keep Out Of Trouble . . . Talk Seventeen. What The Redbird Told Me . . . Talk Eighteen. What Old Bill Could Not Do . . . Talk Nineteen. Divine And Worldly Conformity . Talk Twenty. Baptized With Fire . . . . . . . . . Talk Twenty-One. What To Do With The Devil . Talk Twenty-Two. Waiting On The Lord . . . . . Talk Twenty-Three. Three Necessary “Rations” . Talk Twenty-Four. A Retreat, Or A Rout? . . . . Talk Twenty-Five. My Dream Message . . . . . Talk Twenty-Six. When God Withdraws Himself . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 11 16 23 26 30 34 38 43 45 49 52 56 60 64 69 73 76 80 86 90 94 100 105 110 114 iv Heart Talks Talk Twenty-Seven. What Happened To Solomon . . . . . 116 Talk Twenty-Eight. Fighting The Good Fight Of Faith . . 120 Talk Twenty-Nine. How Are Your Ear Connections? . . . 124 Talk Thirty. Fret Not Thyself . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Talk Thirty-One. Being Easily Entreated . . . . . . . . . . 132 Talk Thirty-Two. Following “Whithersoever” . . . . . . . 136 Talk Thirty-Three. Paul's Persuasion . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Talk Thirty-Four. In Christ And In Ephesus . . . . . . . . 144 Talk Thirty-Five. The Practical Side Of Religion . . . . . 148 Talk Thirty-Six. Do You Need Patience? . . . . . . . . . . 152 Talk Thirty-Seven. Stumbling-Stones, Or Stepping-Stones? 156 Talk Thirty-Eight. Use What You Have . . . . . . . . . . 160 Talk Thirty-Nine. Where The Joy Is . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Talk Forty. Blowing The Clouds Away . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Talk Forty-One. How To Fertilize Love . . . . . . . . . . 171 Talk Forty-Two. How To Overcome Disappointment . . . 175 Talk Forty-Three. The Big End Of Trouble . . . . . . . . . 178 Talk Forty-Four. Self-Made Barriers . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Talk Forty-Five. How To Work God's Joy-Machine . . . . 185 Talk Forty-Six. Be Brave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 Talk Forty-Seven. “But Jesus Sent Him Away” (Luke 8: 38)194 Talk Forty-Eight. Getting The Kernel . . . . . . . . . . . 197 Talk Forty-Nine. Two Sunsets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Talk Fifty. The Sculptor's Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 Talk Fifty-One. The Helplessness Of The Gospel . . . . . 207 Talk Fifty-Two. He Careth For You . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Talk Fifty-Three. Three Tests Of Love . . . . . . . . . . . 213 Talk Fifty-Four. Two Ways Of Rising . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Talk Fifty-Five. Getting Even . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220 Talk Fifty-Six. Do You Know Yourself? . . . . . . . . . . 223 Talk Fifty-Seven. Balkers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 Talk Fifty-Eight. Sponges And Watering-Cans . . . . . . . 229 Talk Fifty-Nine. The Final Retrospect . . . . . . . . . . . 232 Footnotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 [005] Concerning The Author C. W. Naylor The author of Heart Talks has been peculiarly qualified for his task by a training of the soul in the school of suffering. After thirteen years in the ministry, as a result of an internal injury he has been compelled to spend the last thirteen years in his bed day and night, a constant sufferer. He has known the experience of long and intense suffering with no hope of relief from any human source, and with no other prospect for the future than that of remaining a helpless invalid for life and without a means of earning a livelihood. He has learned to trust God for the supply of his temporal needs because there was no other to trust. He has learned to commune with God by being deprived of the opportunity of mingling much with his fellow men. Yet he has not lost the joy out of life. He still does what he can to build up the kingdom of God and bless his fellow men by his words of good cheer. He is still interested in the events of the world, and especially in the progress of God's work. He 2 Heart Talks has demonstrated the efficacy of God's grace to sustain one and give joy in the very discouraging circumstances of life. Though a firm believer in divine healing, and instrumental in the healing of those who kneel at his bedside for prayer, yet he has not received permanent healing, because, as he believes, this is God's method of developing his heart and making him more useful in helping others. During the last five years, especially, he has contributed regularly to a religious periodical articles on subjects similar to those in this book, besides conducting a “Questions Answered” and information department, and writing a number of books. —Gospel Trumpet Company Publishers 1922 A. D. [007] Preface Most of the miscellaneous writings of which this volume is composed appeared originally in serial form. The widespread interest produced by them, the hundreds of letters of appreciation, and the numerous earnest requests for their publication in permanent form have been the moving cause for their presentation in this volume. They cover a very wide range of topics, are written in a popular style, and deal with phases of life and personal experience that are all too much neglected but which every Christian needs to understand. Each paper is complete in itself, though all have a general relation. They are pastoral in nature and have by the blessings of God comforted, encouraged, Reprint Publisher's Foreword (February, 1982) 3 strengthened, and enlightened many souls. That they may by divine help continue to be a blessing to many is the earnest desire of the Author. Anderson, Ind., May 14, 1920 [008] Reprint Publisher's Foreword (February, 1982) This excellent volume, Heart Talks, by C. W. Naylor, has been out of print many years. The cloth-bound book, from which this reprint edition was produced, is the property of Sister Fern Stubblefield of Earlsboro, Okla. Originally owned by the late Nellie Poulos, the book was given in 1978 to Sister Stubblefield by T. Gus Poulos, the son of deceased Nellie Poulos. This volume has been read by a number of saints and ministers who have recommended that it be reprinted with a very few footnote corrections and deletions. Therefore, we submit this book to the reading public with the prayer that the Lord will make its contents a blessing to many precious souls. —Lawrence D. Pruitt Faith Publishing House Publishers [011] Talk One. What It Means To Trust The Lord Throughout the Bible we are exhorted again and again to trust in the Lord. We are warned against trusting in princes, in riches, or in ourselves; for all such trust is vain. Trusting in the Lord is represented as being safe, as blessed, and as producing very desirable results. In it is our hope, our strength, our safety, and our help. But what does trust mean? It does not mean carelessness or indifference. Just to let things go and say, “Oh, I guess it will come out all right,” is not trusting. Just drifting heedlessly with the tide is not trust. Neglect is not trust. Trust is something positive. It is a real something, not a mere happen-so or maybeso. It is a definite attitude of soul and mind, a realization of our own need and of God's sufficiency. It is the reaching out and anchoring of ourselves in God. The soul who really trusts is not driven about by every wind. The waves beat against him as they beat against the anchored ship, but they can not dash him upon the rocks; for he who trusts in God is strong, because he has the strength of God. Trust does not mean shutting our eyes to facts. There is no such thing as “blind faith.” Trust looks at things as they are. It sees the dangers that threaten, and assesses them at their true value. It sees the need, and does not try to disguise it. It sees the difficulties, and does not discount them. But seeing all this, it looks beyond and sees God, its all-sufficient help. It sees him greater than the needs or the dangers or the difficulties, and it does not shrink before them. [012] Talk One. What It Means To Trust The Lord 5 There is no fear in trust: the two are opposites. When we really fear, we are not fully trusting. When we trust, fear gives way to assurance. Fear is tormenting. How many there are who are constantly agitated by fear! They fear the devil, trials, temptations, the wind, lightning, burglars, and a thousand other things. Their days are haunted by fear of this thing or that. Their peace is marred and their hearts are troubled. For all this, trust is the cure. I do not mean to say that if you trust, nothing will ever startle you or frighten you, or that you will never feel physical fear in time of danger; but in such times trust will bring to us a consciousness that the Lord knows and cares, and that his helping presence is with us. When John Wesley was crossing the Atlantic from England to America to become a missionary to the Indians, the ship on which he was sailing encountered a terrible storm. It seemed that those on board would be lost. Many were much alarmed and were in deep distress. Wesley himself was one of this number. In the midst of the storm his attention was attracted to some Moravians who sat calm and undisturbed by the dangers about them. Wesley greatly wondered at their untroubled appearance. He inquired why it was. Their reply was that they were trusting in the Lord and that they had in their souls the consciousness of his protecting presence and care. They felt no fear because there was nothing threatening that a Christian had need to fear. Mr. Wesley did not have such an experience, but what he learned from those simple-hearted people caused him to seek a similar experience. There is no worry in trust. When we worry about anything, we have not committed it to God. Trust takes away the anxiety. So many people use up a large portion of their energy in worry. There is always something troubling them. Their days and nights are full of anxiety. Worrying becomes a fixed habit with them. Peace and calmness and assurance find but little room in their lives. The cure for all this is trust. Trust brings confidence. Trust [013] 6 Heart Talks [014] whispers to our souls that there is no cause to worry. It tells us that God holds the helm of our vessel. It bids us to be of good courage, assuring us that God is our refuge and strength, that our lives and all are in his hands, and that he will work out for us the things that are best. O soul, stop worrying, and trust. It is so much better. If you find yourself worrying, stop right there. Take your eyes off the things that trouble you; look up, and keep looking up till you see God and his infinite care for you. Remember that when you worry you are not trusting, and that when you trust you are not worrying. Worry depresses, discourages, and weakens. It never helps us in any way. It is always a hindrance to us. God wants to bring into our lives a peaceful calm like that of a summer evening. He would have us without anxiety, as care-free as the birds or the lilies. It is trust that brings us this experience. Will you not learn to trust? “Casting all your care on him; for he careth for you.” There is no murmuring in trust. When all is trusted into God's hands, it brings to us a feeling of satisfaction concerning God's dealings with us. We can sing from our hearts, “God's way is best; I will not murmur.” When we trust, it is easy to praise. When we trust, the heart is full of thankful appreciation. If you are inclined to murmur, it is because you do not trust. There is no feeling of bitterness when things do not go as we think they should, if we are trusting. Bitterness comes from rebellion, and there is no rebellion in trust. Trust can always say, “Not my will, but thine, be done.” In trust there is peace, the peace of God which passeth understanding. There is calm in the soul of him who trusts. There is no doubt in trust, for doubt is swallowed up in assurance, and assurance brings calmness and peace. Trusting brings confidence. It permits us to see God in his true character. It causes us to realize the greatness and tenderness of his love. It gives us a consciousness of his might, and through