Myths and Legends of Our Own Land — Volume 01: the Hudson and its hills

Myths and Legends of Our Own Land — Volume 01: the Hudson and its hills

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Project Gutenberg's The Hudson And Its Hills, by Charles M. SkinnerThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: The Hudson And Its Hills Myths And Legends Of Our Own Land, Volume 1.Author: Charles M. SkinnerRelease Date: October 22, 2006 [EBook #6606]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE HUDSON AND ITS HILLS ***Produced by David WidgerMYTHS AND LEGENDS OF OUR OWN LAND By Charles M. SkinnerVol. 1.THE HUDSON AND ITS HILLSCONTENTS OF ALL VOLUMES:THE HUDSON AND ITS HILLSRip Van WinkleCatskill GnomesThe Catskill WitchThe Revenge of ShandakenCondemned to the NooseBig IndianThe Baker's DozenThe Devil's Dance-ChamberThe Culprit FayPokepsieDunderbergAnthony's NoseMoodua CreekA Trapper's Ghastly VengeanceThe Vanderdecken of Tappan ZeeThe Galloping HessianStorm Ship on the HudsonWhy Spuyten Duyvil is so NamedThe Ramapo SalamanderChief CrotonThe Retreat from MahopacNiagaraThe Deformed of ZoarHorseheadsKayuta and WanetaThe Drop StarThe Prophet of PalmyraA Villain's CremationThe Monster MosquitoThe Green PictureThe Nuns of CarthageThe Skull in the WallThe Haunted MillOld Indian FaceThe Division of the SaranacsAn Event in Indian ParkThe Indian ...

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Project Gutenberg's The Hudson And Its Hills, by Charles M. Skinner This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: The Hudson And Its Hills Myths And Legends Of Our Own Land, Volume 1. Author: Charles M. Skinner Release Date: October 22, 2006 [EBook #6606] Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE HUDSON AND ITS HILLS ***  
Produced by David Widger
MYTHS AND LEGENDS OF OUR OWN LAND
 By  Charles M. Skinner Vol. 1.
THE HUDSON AND ITS HILLS
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CONTENTS OF ALL VOLUMES:
THEHUDSON AND ITS HILLS
Rip Van Winkle Catskill Gnomes The Catskill Witch The Revenge of Shandaken Condemned to the Noose Big Indian The Baker's Dozen The Devil's Dance-Chamber The Culprit Fay Pokepsie Dunderberg Anthony's Nose Moodua Creek A Trapper's Ghastly Vengeance The Vanderdecken of Tappan Zee The Galloping Hessian Storm Ship on the Hudson Why Spuyten Duyvil is so Named The Ramapo Salamander Chief Croton The Retreat from Mahopac Niagara The Deformed of Zoar Horseheads Kayuta and Waneta The Drop Star The Prophet of Palmyra A Villain's Cremation The Monster Mosquito The Green Picture The Nuns of Carthage The Skull in the Wall The Haunted Mill Old Indian Face The Division of the Saranacs An Event in Indian Park The Indian Plume Birth of the Water-Lily Rogers's Slide The Falls at Cohoes Francis Woolcott's Night-Riders Polly's Lover Crosby, the Patriot Spy The Lost Grave of Paine The Rising of Gouverneur Morris
THE ISLE OF MANHATTOES AND NEARBY
W ehiddeoRgnetsingriir D Vck DanoDpl heHlygierThe Knell at t giSvlrerCmulbniaterThe od and Wfo solB pS egnironStThesppteg-ins'S veliehD ekTrs Poton'Britiss MdnalsI tebbiG mro ftyar PheaTarirst Liberal ChupSritiH naTdehF nkdarkMaf  oe th lavddiFsrelnayWatchry We RierThoGso'l sW aeTeehtVenemoppeem WantroC ehTlE uoyle
f  oipShd ea DheTtimreH notsiweLThe ksusSwun of irgnS onTeehlenilcWes h'nJtok acrO dgnirer tehcar had nooolmasteTlehS hcaHprwsleEgnavnttuhCseee A lrTher WatcThe  LogM fo esooM ehTniOwe Theoin Kntouedt  oeHaw'y siRBall GamavenThe lsI CdnaW noetihsaasnacocohoaPruaFatrsulMoodher lBca'y slihT keVLih atDeg ogtMghhTenogeMU ydaL eitchThe Marriageo  foMnu taKatdhHoe  omeThf deunehTrraP dirtW egssine MinTheg Maet receP ,htuRggat FheoTgeor Falfo ssoL omateeW tThe Gloucester o htreW tihcrcfahid Bus alrila-PgaeLsreuataSna n thteveY saCen'rSkinnclearbuat Cdna melaSpaeL s'erov Litl al ceyuotniasnW ihetM  SacoThee by theehTserG  tnumadA oonMon e ThsiViyaM ehTefo eloP-moryer M DhetTuna dnveliW laT mohe GkerTChamray ocaJuH bhTdroH emaboerkBhiks TreroeiTsehR veneeg of Josiah BreezntMas e'oranle EreuqsaM s'ewoHelr Dustheld EadeOo  foLsshT eldyee Thd Olmet-ot-nemoSlivrlliM ta  RandolpleEdwardartiaLyd'h soPtr
The Phantom Dragoon Delaware Water Gap The Phantom Drummer The Missing Soldier of Valley Forge The Last Shot at Germantown A Blow in the Dark The Tory's Conversion Lord Percy's Dream Saved by the Bible Parricide of the Wissahickon The Blacksmith at Brandywine Father and Son The Envy of Manitou The Last Revel in Printz Hall The Two Rings Flame Scalps of the Chartiers The Consecration of Washington Marion
TALES OF PURITAN LAND
ON AND NEAR THE DELAWARE
sll haFocanWyhaimhtst SForeThe pion
rm ShipThe WindhehN weH vaneS ot CtsseonenqusTce AsenniDa rei dnhant EncsBlomentoNsiud sddmaseaHcrSaf  oooeMicifsgorF mabmaL ehTF taLevokcowdos'obert LoccaneerRhTenuB eaP eitaland thd  IckanslmRud ane oGno ydoeloCeneGl raulMon tod anugcssuH naiggnhTe Unknown ChampiV s'ahtr drayenintNad anovtLkeuceDivht eS ekTlehn inletoorMa ArmptamnTow oonSwf  dna taCC eh woreasonThee and Tr skSleteH aeldseam N aofn girilOlppA dooR haciMeillTns Hopkiof HM liotendlS ehO 
The Swim at Indian Head The Moaning Sisters A Ride for a Bride Spooks of the Hiawassee Lake of the Dismal Swamp The Barge of Defeat Natural Bridge The Silence Broken Siren of the French Broad The Hunter of Calawassee Revenge of the Accabee Toccoa Falls Two Lives for One A Ghostly Avenger The Wraith Ringer of Atlanta The Swallowing Earthquake The Last Stand of the Biloxi The Sacred Fire of Natchez Pass Christian The Under Land
LIGHTS AND SHADOWS OF THE SOUTH
 olethf Soe hwutilEtW aztrahaSnoe Salem Alchemisknee-koMnoekkehTednclaBahokSoc RraziWatonelG s'de DeWhitf Oner oht ea  thT eoTbmconKgnik erTaeusera dnt he CatsThe WessaHeditraeaerbiH kHally rrinMaTh:  suSgAenegkSrrair Irippe's ResonorP s'llehTycehpkiiehr Sanom Wngury's Ol CodNewbeu leSaw dlESmmateMae ThNises x' fo epaCdliWnaM eweAr CrotheishMC rules'aRhcnu thitsurCoe ThksicdnatS selyM fo p
tteli  nht eiAr
An Averted Peril The Obstinacy of Saint Clair The Hundredth Skull The Crime of Black Swamp The House Accursed Marquette's Man-Eater Michel de Coucy's Troubles Wallen's Ridge The Sky Walker of Huron The Coffin of Snakes Mackinack Lake Superior Water Gods The Witch of Pictured Rocks The Origin of White Fish The Spirit of Cloudy The Sun Fire at Sault Sainte Marie The Snake God of Belle Isle Were-Wolves of Detroit The Escape of Francois Navarre The Old Lodger The Nain Rouge Two Revenges Hiawatha The Indian Messiah The Vision of Rescue Devil's Lake The Keusca Elopement Pipestone The Virgins' Feast Falls of St. Anthony Flying Shadow and Track Maker Saved by a Lightning-Stroke The Killing of Cloudy Sky Providence Hole The Scare Cure Twelfth Night at Cahokia The Spell of Creve Coeur Lake How the Crime was Revealed Banshee of the Bad Lands Standing Rock The Salt Witch
ALONG THE ROCKY RANGE
pS erediwoT hTreLoe  TstilraBaA cetl-aTsht foT efiri oceea PackStaS uqwaneiten l Weird StningThehTstnaiG dna dao TedrnHoerid Rheamcn eoCnuhTehS rs tnques CoVwottTal Cheinomofg eF addoG sseS fohe Flood at SanthT eeDta haWtlTzFae al PghLid cenuoM noiehTsniaton SArk stituperN vat ehhT ejasoHTEC EKASEG ERTAL ATES ANDNTRAL STiv DeTiderOvhe thall Pas of MarsmoT arniehP ahtntS yavranoiteY AibTrBeesegsi bedTyehB ordaH uoesllowstone TragedsluoS tso srediRiv RhesTLof  oerisnoiDivwT oo  fe Def thThe sert
PREFACE It is unthinkingly said and often, that America is not old enough to have developed a legendary era, for such an era grows backward as a nation grows forward. No little of the charm of European travel is ascribed to the glamour that history and fable have flung around old churches, castles, and the favored haunts of tourists, and the Rhine and Hudson are frequently compared, to the prejudice of the latter, not because its scenery lacks in loveliness or grandeur, but that its beauty has not been humanized by love of chivalry or faerie, as that of the older stream has been. Yet the record of our country's progress is of deep import, and as time goes on the figures seen against the morning twilight of our history will rise to more commanding stature, and the mists of legend will invest them with a softness or glory that shall make reverence for them spontaneous and deep. Washington hurling the stone across the Potomac may live as the Siegfried of some Western saga, and Franklin invoking the lightnings may be the Loki of our mythology. The bibliography of American legends is slight, and these tales have been gathered from sources the most diverse: records, histories, newspapers, magazines, oral narrative—in every case reconstructed. The pursuit of them has been so long that a claim may be set forth for some measure of completeness. But, whatever the episodes of our four historic centuries may furnish to the poet, painter, dramatist, or legend-building idealist of the future, it is certain that we are not devoid of myth and folk-lore. Some characters, prosaic enough, perhaps, in daily life, have impinged so lightly on society before and after perpetrating their one or two great deeds, that they have already become shadowy and their achievements have acquired a color of the supernatural. It is where myth and history combine that legend is most interesting and appeals to our fancy or our sympathy most strongly; and it is not too early for us to begin the collation of those quaint happenings and those spoken reports that gain in picturesqueness with each transmission. An attempt has been made in this instance to assemble only legends, for, doubtful as some historians profess to find them, certain occurrences, like the story of Captain Smith and Pocahontas, and the ride of General Putnam down Breakneck Stairs, are taught as history; while as to folk-lore, that of the Indian tribes and of the Southern negro is too copious to be recounted in this work. It will be noted that traditions do not thrive in brick and brownstone, and that the stories once rife in the colonial cities have almost as effectually disappeared as the architectural landmarks of last century. The field entered by the writer is not untrodden. Hawthorne and Irving have made paths across it, and it is hoped that others may deem its farther exploration worthy of their efforts.
AS TO BURIED TREASURE Kidd's Treasure Other Buried Wealth
STORIED WATERS, CLIFFS AND MOUNTAINS
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