The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 25 (of 25)

The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 25 (of 25)

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson Swanston Edition Vol. 25 (of 25), by Robert Louis Stevenson This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 25 (of 25) Author: Robert Louis Stevenson Other: Andrew Lang Release Date: December 19, 2009 [EBook #30714] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK WORKS OF STEVENSON *** Produced by Marius Masi, Jonathan Ingram and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net Transcriber's note: A few punctuation errors have been corrected. They appear in the text like this, and the explanation will appear when the mouse pointer is moved over the marked passage. Hyphenation inconsistencies were left unchanged. THE WORKS OF ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON SWANSTON EDITION VOLUME XXV Of this SWANSTON EDITION in Twenty-five Volumes of the Works of ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON Two Thousand and Sixty Copies have been printed, of which only Two Thousand Copies are for sale. This is No. ............ THE WORKS OF ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON VOLUME TWENTY-FIVE LONDON: PUBLISHED BY CHATTO AND WINDUS: IN ASSOCIATION WITH CASSELL AND COMPANY LIMITED: WILLIAM HEINEMANN: AND LONGMANS GREEN AND COMPANY MDCCCCXII For permission to use the LETTERS in the SWANSTON EDITION OF STEVENSON’ S WORKS the Publishers are indebted to the kindness of MESSRS. METHUEN & C O ., LTD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED THE LETTERS OF ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON EDITED BY SIDNEY COLVIN PARTS XI—XIV CONTENTS XI. LIFE IN SAMOA PART I.—THE OLD BUCCANEER PAGE INTRODUCTORY LETTERS— To Sidney Colvin To E. L. Burlingame To Sidney Colvin To E. L. Burlingame To Sidney Colvin To Henry James To Rudyard Kipling To Sidney Colvin To Marcel Schwob To Charles Baxter To Sidney Colvin To H. B. Baildon To Sidney Colvin To the Same To W. Craibe Angus To Edmund Gosse To Miss Rawlinson To Sidney Colvin To Miss Adelaide Boodle To Charles Baxter To Sidney Colvin To E. L. Burlingame To W. Craibe Angus To H. C. Ide To Sidney Colvin To the Same To the Same To Henry James To E. L. Burlingame To the Same To Sidney Colvin To W. Craibe Angus To Miss Annie H. Ide To Charles Baxter To Sidney Colvin To Fred Orr 3 9 24 25 32 34 43 46 48 51 53 54 56 58 66 69 71 74 76 80 82 83 86 87 88 90 94 102 108 110 111 112 118 118 120 121 127 To E. L. Burlingame To Henry James To Sidney Colvin XII. LIFE IN SAMOA—continued SECOND YEAR AT VAILIMA 128 130 132 INTRODUCTORY LETTERS— To E. L. Burlingame To Miss Adelaide Boodle To Sidney Colvin To J. M. Barrie To Sidney Colvin To William Morris To Mrs. Charles Fairchild To Sidney Colvin To E. L. Burlingame To the Rev. S. J. Whitmee To Charles Baxter To Sidney Colvin To the Same To T. W. Dover To E. L. Burlingame To Sidney Colvin To Charles Baxter To W. E. Henley To E. L. Burlingame To Andrew Lang To Miss Adelaide Boodle To Sidney Colvin To the Countess of Jersey To the Same To Sidney Colvin To Mrs. Charles Fairchild To the Children in the Cellar To Sidney Colvin To Gordon Browne To Miss Morse 144 146 147 152 154 156 162 163 166 174 174 177 178 193 209 210 211 213 214 215 216 217 221 228 229 230 240 243 249 252 253 To Miss Taylor To E. L. Burlingame To Sidney Colvin To J. M. Barrie To E. L. Burlingame To Lieutenant Eeles To Charles Baxter To Sidney Colvin To Mrs. Fleeming Jenkin To Henry James To J. M. Barrie To Charles Baxter XIII. LIFE IN SAMOA—continued THIRD YEAR AT VAILIMA 254 257 258 264 266 267 270 271 273 274 276 278 INTRODUCTORY LETTERS— To Sidney Colvin To Charles Baxter To Sidney Colvin To the Same To Charles Baxter To Sidney Colvin To A. Conan Doyle To Sidney Colvin To S. R. Crockett To Augustus St. Gaudens To Sidney Colvin To Edmund Gosse To Henry James To Sidney Colvin To James S. Stevenson To Henry James To A. Conan Doyle To Charles Baxter To Sidney Colvin To A. Conan Doyle To Augustus St. Gaudens 280 282 288 289 291 292 294 299 299 305 308 310 317 320 324 334 335 336 337 338 339 341 To James S. Stevenson To George Meredith To Charles Baxter To Sidney Colvin To the Same To J. Horne Stevenson To John P——n To Russell P——n To Alison Cunningham To Charles Baxter To J. M. Barrie To R. Le Gallienne To Mrs. A. Baker To Henry James To Sidney Colvin XIV. LIFESAMOA—concluded FOURTH YEAR AT VAILIMA—THE END 342 343 345 347 352 357 358 359 359 360 362 364 366 367 367 INTRODUCTORY LETTERS— To Charles Baxter To H. B. Baildon To W. H. Low To Sidney Colvin To H. B. Baildon To Sidney Colvin To J. H. Bates To William Archer To Sidney Colvin To W. B. Yeats To George Meredith To Charles Baxter To Mrs. Sitwell To Charles Baxter To Sidney Colvin To R. A. M. Stevenson To Sidney Colvin To Henry James 373 376 377 378 380 381 382 384 384 386 390 390 392 393 394 396 398 404 406 To Marcel Schwob To A. St. Gaudens To Miss Adelaide Boodle To Mrs. A. Baker To Sidney Colvin To J. M. Barrie To Sidney Colvin To Dr. Bakewell To James Payn To Miss Middleton To A. Conan Doyle To Sidney Colvin To Charles Baxter To R. A. M. Stevenson To Sir Herbert Maxwell To Sidney Colvin To Alison Cunningham To James Payn To Sidney Colvin To Professor Meiklejohn To Lieutenant Eeles To Sir Herbert Maxwell To Andrew Lang To Edmund Gosse APPENDIX I—Account of the Death and Burial of R. L. Stevenson, by Lloyd Osbourne APPENDIX II—Address of R. L. Stevenson to the Chiefs on the Opening of the Road of Gratitude, October 1894 INDEX TO THE LETTERS : VOLUMES XXIII-XXV INDEX TO VOLUMES I—XXII 409 410 410 413 414 416 422 424 425 428 429 430 433 434 440 441 445 446 448 450 451 453 453 454 457 462 469 509 1 THE LETTERS OF ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON 1890—1894 2 THE LETTERS OF ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON 3 XI LIFE IN SAMOA FIRST YEAR AT VAILIMA NOVEMBER 1890-DECEMBER 1891 R ETURNING from Sydney at the end of October 1890, Stevenson and his wife at once took up their abode in the wooden four-roomed cottage, or “rough barrack,” as he calls it, which had been built for them in the clearing at Vailima during the months of their absence at Sydney and on their cruise in the Equator . Mr. Lloyd Osbourne in the meantime had started for England to wind up the family affairs at Bournemouth. During the first few months, as will be seen by the following letters, the conditions of life at Vailima were rough to the point of hardship. But matters soon mended; the work of clearing and planting went on under the eye of the master and mistress diligently and in the main successfully, though not of course without complications and misadventures. Ways and means of catering were found, and abundance began to reign in place of the makeshifts and privations of the first days. By April a better house, fit to receive the elder Mrs. Stevenson, had been built; and later in the year plans for further extension were considered, but for the present held over. The attempt made at first to work the establishment by means of white servants and head-men indoors and out proved unsatisfactory, and was gradually superseded by the formation of an efficient native staff, which in course of time developed itself into something like a small, devoted feudal clan. During the earlier months of 1891 Stevenson was not in continuous residence on his new property, but went away on two excursions, the first to Sydney to meet his mother; the second, in company of the American Consul Mr. Sewall, to Tutuila, a neighbouring island of the Samoan group. Of the latter, to him very interesting, trip, the correspondence contains only the beginning of an account abruptly broken off: more, will be found in the extracts from his diary given in Mr. Graham Balfour’s Life (ed. 1906, pp. 312 f.). During part of the spring he was fortunate in having the company of two distinguished Americans, the painter Lafarge and the historian Henry Adams, in addition to that of the local planters, traders, and officials, a 4