Twenty Years of Congress, Volume 2 - From Lincoln to Garfield, with a Review of the Events Which Led to the Political Revolution of 1860

Twenty Years of Congress, Volume 2 - From Lincoln to Garfield, with a Review of the Events Which Led to the Political Revolution of 1860

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The Project Gutenberg eBook, Twenty Years of Congress, Volume 2 (of 2), by James Gillespie Blaine
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,
give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at
www.gutenberg.org
Title: Twenty Years of Congress, Volume 2 (of 2) From Lincoln to Garfield, with a Review of the Events Which Led to the
Political Revolution of 1860
Author: James Gillespie Blaine
Release Date: December 8, 2006 [eBook #20065]
Language: English
***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK TWENTY YEARS OF CONGRESS, VOLUME 2 (OF 2)***
E-text prepared by an anonymous volunteer
Transcriber's note:
The chapter summaries in the Table of Contents are repeated
in the text at the start of each chapter.
Footnotes are at the end of the chapter (or section of a Table
of Congress), referenced by parenthesized numbers, e.g. (1).
The capitalization of hyphenated words is inconsistent,
following the text, as is the use of the comma in lists.
The tables of the 39th and 40th Congresses are moved to the
Appendices.
Line 2874: "gauge of battle" changed to "gage of battle"
Line 12981: missing numerator in "3/10" supplied from preceding text.
Non-standard spellings: domicil; hinderance; cotemporary]
TWENTY YEARS OF CONGRESS:
From Lincoln to Garfield
With a Review of the Events Which Led to the Political Revolution of 1860.
by
JAMES G. ...

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Publié le 08 décembre 2010
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The Project Gutenberg eBook, Twenty Years of
Congress, Volume 2 (of 2), by James Gillespie
Blaine
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at
no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the
terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: Twenty Years of Congress, Volume 2 (of 2)
From Lincoln to Garfield, with a Review of the
Events Which Led to the Political Revolution of
1860
Author: James Gillespie Blaine
Release Date: December 8, 2006 [eBook #20065]
Language: English
***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG
EBOOK TWENTY YEARS OF CONGRESS,
VOLUME 2 (OF 2)***E-text prepared by an anonymous volunteer
Transcriber's note:
The chapter summaries in the Table of Contents
are repeated
in the text at the start of each chapter.
Footnotes are at the end of the chapter (or
section of a Table
of Congress), referenced by parenthesized
numbers, e.g. (1).
The capitalization of hyphenated words is
inconsistent,
following the text, as is the use of the comma in
lists.
The tables of the 39th and 40th Congresses are
moved to the
Appendices.
Line 2874: "gauge of battle" changed to "gage of
battle"
Line 12981: missing numerator in "3/10" supplied
from preceding text.
Non-standard spellings: domicil; hinderance;
cotemporary]TWENTY YEARS OF
CONGRESS:
From Lincoln to Garfield
With a Review of the Events Which Led to the
Political Revolution of 1860.
by
JAMES G. BLAINE.
Volume II.
Norwich, Conn.:
The Henry Bill Publishing Company.
1886.
Copyright, 1884,
by James G. Blaine.
All rights reserved.Electrotyped and Printed
By Rand, Avery, and Company,
Boston, MassCONTENTS OF VOLUME II.
CHAPTER I.
ANDREW JOHNSON INSTALLED AS
PRESIDENT.—CABINET AND SENATORS
WITNESSES TO THE CEREMONY.—
RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE NEW PRESIDENT
DELICATE IN CHARACTER.—REQUIRING THE
HIGHEST ORDER OF STATESMANSHIP.—THE
QUESTION OF RECONSTRUCTION.—ITS
PECULIAR DIFFICULTIES.—NEW AND
PERPLEXING QUESTIONS.—CHARACTER AND
CAREER OF MR. JOHNSON.—BORN IN NORTH
CAROLINA.—MIGRATES TO TENNESSEE.—HIS
RAPID PROMOTION IN THAT STATE.— A
TAILOR BY TRADE.—WITHOUT EDUCATION—
TAUGHT TO READ AT FIFTEEN.— MAYOR OF
TOWN AT TWENTY-TWO.—IN THE
LEGISLATURE AT TWENTY-SEVEN.—
PRESIDENTIAL ELECTOR IN 1840 AT THIRTY-
TWO.—IN CONGRESS AT THIRTY- FIVE.—
GOVERNOR FROM 1853 TO 1857.—HIS
HOMESTEAD POLICY.—NECESSARY
ANTAGONISM WITH SLAVERY.—HIS IDEAL OF
A RURAL POPULATION.—BOLDNESS OF HIS
POLITICAL COURSE IN TENNESSEE.—HIS
LOYALTY TO THE UNION.— SEPARATES FROM
THE DEMOCRATIC CONSPIRATORS.—HIS
CAREER IN THE CIVIL WAR.—APPOINTED
MILITARY GOVERNOR OF TENNESSEE.—HISABLE ADMINISTRATION OF THE OFFICE.—
FORESHADOWS A SEVERE POLICY AS
PRESIDENT.—CONTRAST WITH MR. LINCOLN.
—ANALYSIS OF JOHNSON'S POSITION. —HIS
BRIEF INAUGURAL ADDRESS.—EFFECT
PRODUCED BY IT.—HIS ADDRESS TO AN
ILLINOIS DELEGATION.—SIGNIFICANT
INDICATION OF A HARSH POLICY TOWARDS
THE REBELS.—PRESTON KING'S INFLUENCE.
—PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS TO A CHRISTIAN
COMMISSION.—TO LOYAL SOUTHERNERS.—
TO A PENNSYLVANIA DELEGATION.—
PRESIDENT'S TONE GROWS STERNER
TOWARDS "TRAITORS."— STRIKING
CONVERSATION WITH SENATOR WADE.—
FUNERAL CEREMONIES OF THE LATE
PRESIDENT.—REMAINS CARRIED TO ILLINOIS.
—IMPRESSIVE SCENE IN BALTIMORE.—IN
PHILADELPHIA.—BODY REPOSES IN
INDEPENDENCE HALL.— CONTRAST WITH
FOUR YEARS BEFORE.—UNPARALLELED
DISPLAY OF FEELING IN NEW YORK.—
ORATION BY GEORGE BANCROFT.—ELEGIAC
ODE BY WILLIAM CULLEN BRYANT.—
INTERMENT IN ILLINOIS.—CEREMONIES
COMPARED WITH THOSE OF ROYALTY.—
PROFOUND FEELING THROUGHOUT THE
COUNTRY.—PUBLIC MANIFESTATION OF
MOURNING.
CHAPTER II.
MILITARY REVIEW IN HONOR OF UNIONVICTORY.—THE EASTERN AND WESTERN
ARMIES.—THEIR GREAT ACHIEVEMENTS.—
SPECIAL INTEREST.—NUMBER OF BATTLES
DURING THE WAR.—NUMBER EACH YEAR.—
STRUGGLE OF 1861-65.— DISCIPLINE OF THE
ARMY.—MORAL RESPONSIBILITY OF
CONTINUING THE CONTEST.—NEEDLESS
SLAUGHTER OF MEN.—CONFEDERATE
RESPONSIBILITY.— SPEECH OF ROBERT M. T.
HUNTER, FOLLOWED BY JUDAH P. BENJAMIN.
— EXTREME MEASURES ADVOCATED BY HIM.
—HIS OVER-ZEAL.—MR. BENJAMIN SEEKS
REFUGE IN ENGLAND.—HIS SUCCESS THERE
DUE TO ENGLISH SYMPATHY WITH THE
REBELLION.—HIS MALIGNITY TOWARDS THE
UNION.—SOUTHERN CHARACTER.—ITS
STRONG POINTS AND ITS WEAK POINTS.—
CONDUCT OF CONFEDERATE CONGRESS.—
THEIR INFLAMMATORY ADDRESS.—ITS
EXTRAVAGANCE AND ABSURDITY.—
JEFFERSON DAVIS'S ADDRESS TO
CONGRESS.—HIS LACK OF MORAL
COURAGE.—DISBANDMENT OF UNION ARMY,
1,00,516 MEN.—ANOTHER MILLION GONE
BEFORE.—SELF- SUPPORT AND SELF-
ADJUSTMENT.—COMPARISON WITH THE
ARMY OF THE REVOLUTION.—UNION
OFFICERS ALL YOUNG MEN.—AGES OF
OFFICERS IN OTHER WARS.—AGES OF
REGULAR ARMY OFFICERS.—OF VOLUNTEER
OFFICERS.—HARMONY OF THE TWO.—
SPECIAL EFFICIENCY OF THE VOLUNTEERS.—
MAGNITUDE OF THE UNION ARMY.—THE
INFANTRY, CAVALRY, ARTILLERY.—NUMBEROF GENERALS.— NUMBER OF REGIMENTS.—
MILITARY RESOURCES OF THE REPUBLIC.—
ITS SECURITY IN TIME OF DANGER.
CHAPTER III.
THE RECONSTRUCTION PROBLEM.—THE
PRESIDENT'S PUBLIC ADDRESSES.—TIME
FOR ACTION ARRIVED.—PROCLAMATION
DECLARING HOSTILITIES CEASED.—MANNER
OF DEALING WITH INSURRECTIONARY
STATES.—MR. LINCOLN'S FIRST EFFORTS AT
RECONSTRUCTION.—ELECTION IN
LOUISIANA.—FLANDERS AND HAHN.—MR.
LINCOLN'S NOTE TO GENERAL SHEPLEY.—TO
CUTHBERT BULLETT.—MR. LINCOLN'S
DEFINITE PLAN.—"ONE-TENTH" OF VOTERS
TO ORGANIZE LOYAL STATE GOVERNMENT.—
FREE-STATE CONVENTION IN LOUISIANA.—
MICHAEL HAHN ELECTED GOVERNOR.—
CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION.—MR.
LINCOLN'S CONGRATULATIONS.— SIMILAR
ACTION IN ARKANSAS.—ISAAC MURPHY
ELECTED GOVERNOR.— REPRESENTATION IN
CONGRESS DENIED TO THESE STATES.—MR.
SUMNER'S RESOLUTION.—ADOPTED BY
SENATE.—SIMILAR ACTION IN HOUSE.—
CONFLICT BETWEEN THE PRESIDENT AND
CONGRESS.—CONGRESSIONAL PLAN OF
RECONSTRUCTION.—THREE FUNDAMENTAL
CONDITIONS.—BILL PASSED JULY 4, 1864.—
NOT APPROVED BY THE PRESIDENT.—HIS
REASONS GIVEN IN A PUBLICPROCLAMATION.—SENATOR WADE AND H.
WINTER DAVIS CRITICISE THE
PROCLAMATION.—THEIR PROTEST.—
SUBSEQUENT RESOLUTION OF CONGRESS.—
THE PRESIDENT'S REPLY TO IT.—MR.
LINCOLN'S PROBABLE COURSE ON THE
SUBJECT OF RECONSTRUCTION.—
RECONSTRUCTION OF THE GOVERNMENT OF
TENNESSEE.—THE QUICK PROCESS OF
DOING.—RATIFIED BY POPULAR VOTE, 25,293
TO 48.— PARSON BROWNLOW CHOSEN
GOVERNOR.—PATTERSON AND FOWLER
ELECTED SENATORS.—JOHNSON'S
INAUGURATION AS VICE-PRESIDENT.—HIS
SPEECH.—WERE THE REBEL STATES OUT OF
THE UNION?—JOHNSON'S VIEWS.—MR.
LINCOLN'S VIEWS.—RADICAL AND
CONSERVATIVE.—EXTRA SESSION DEBATED.
—ADVERSE DECISION.—ILL-LUCK OF EXTRA
SESSIONS.
CHAPTER IV.
PRESIDENT JOHN AND THE CABINET.—
EFFECT OF VICE-PRESIDENT'S ACCESSION.
—EXAMPLE OF TYLER IN 1841 AND FILLMORE
IN 1850.—A VICE-PRESIDENT'S
DIFFICULT POSITION.—PERSONNEL OF
CABINET IN 1865.—ITS NEARLY EVEN
DIVISION ON RECONSTRUCTION ISSUES.—
PRESUMED POSITION OF EACH MEMBER.—
STANTON, HARLAN, AND DENNISON RADICAL.
—WELLES, McCULLOCH, AND SPEED