TEXAS 4-H CLOVER
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TEXAS 4-H CLOVER

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1 Jun 2011 – Shooting Sports ..................................................... 37. Soil and Crop Science ..... National 4-H Curriculum (www.n4hccs.org): Beef 1 - Bite into Beef ...

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TEXAS C4L-HOVER2008-2009

Racing into a new
century of Texas 4-H!

Educational programs of the Texas AgriLife Extension Service are open to all people without regard to race, color, sex, disability, religion, age, or national origin.
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n furtherance of
Cooperative Extension Work in Agriculture and Home Economics, Acts of Congress of May 8, 1914, as amended, and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the United States Department
of Agriculture. Edward G. Smith, Director, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, The Texas A&M University System.

The Texas 4-H Clover is a catalog of the many opportunities, programs, activities, and events that enrich the 4-H
experience. The information provided in the Texas 4-H Clover covers the period from September 1, 2008 through
August 31, 2009.

As with any annual periodical publication, the opportunities and contact information may change. 4-H members,
leaders, volunteers, and parents are encouraged to stay in contact with their county Extension of

ce on the latest
information regarding any opportunity or experience in the Texas 4-H Clover.

Texas 4-H and Youth Development Program
7607 Eastmark Drive, Suite 101
College Station, Texas 77840
http://texas4-h.tamu.edu

Enrollment & Application Information. ..................3
Project Selection Information .................................4
Adults ......................................................................6
After-School ............................................................6
Alumni ....................................................................6
Ambassadors ...........................................................6
Aquatic Science ......................................................7
Beef .........................................................................7
Biological Sciences .................................................8
Camps .....................................................................8
Character Education ................................................9
Citizenship ............................................................10
Clothing & Textiles ...............................................10
Club Ed .................................................................11
Community Service Projects. ................................11
Companion Animals..............................................11
Computer Science .................................................12
Consumer Education .............................................12
Council ..................................................................13
Dairy Cattle ...........................................................13
Dog Care and Training ..........................................14
Educational Presentations .....................................14
Entomology ...........................................................14
Entrepreneurship ...................................................15
4-H CONNECT ....................................................15
Family Life. ...........................................................15
Field and Stream ...................................................15
Food and Nutrition ................................................16
Forestry .................................................................17
Goats .....................................................................18
Health ....................................................................19
Horse .....................................................................19
Horticulture ...........................................................21
Housing and Home Environment. .........................22
Leadership .............................................................22

Texas 4-H and Youth Development

Management System
(4-H Road to Successful Clubs)
..24
Meat Science .........................................................24
Military 4-H ..........................................................24
National 4-H Opportunities. ..................................26
National 4-H Technology Team ............................26
National Dairy Conference ...................................26
Natural Resources .................................................26
Outdoor Education ................................................27
Parents ...................................................................27
Photography ..........................................................27
Poultry ...................................................................28
Projects (4-H) ........................................................28
Public Speaking ....................................................28
Quiz Bowls............................................................29
Rabbits ..................................................................29
Range Science .......................................................29
Recognition ...........................................................30
Record Books ........................................................32
Recreation .............................................................32
Roundup ................................................................34
Safety ....................................................................34
Scholarships ..........................................................35
Share-the-Fun. .......................................................36
Sheep .....................................................................37
Shooting Sports .....................................................37
Soil and Crop Science ...........................................40
Sport

shing ...........................................................40
Swine.....................................................................40
Veterinary Science ................................................41
Volunteer ...............................................................42
Volunteer Recognition...........................................44
Water .....................................................................44
Wildlife and Fisheries ...........................................45
Workforce Preparation/Career Development ........45

Page 2

2008-2009 Texas 4-H Clover

Program yearProject enrollment
The 4-H program year begins on September 1 and All 4-H members must be enrolled in at least one
concludes on August 31 the following year. project and provide written evidence of project
completion. A member may add or delete project
Membership policies
enrollments at any time during the 4-H year. A
Any person, regardless of socioeconomic level, race, color, member of a 4-H club must participate in 4-H
religion, disability or national origin, may enroll as a 4-H learning groups and other educational activities
member. Texas 4-H membership is open to youth between under the guidance of a 4-H volunteer who is
the ages of 9 (OR 8 and in the third grade) and 18 on enrolled with the county Extension of

ce.
August 31. A youths eligibility for membership will expire
on August 31 of the 4-H year in which the 19th birthday
Statewide projects/activities
occurs. The 4-H projects listed in this handbook are
offered in most of the counties in Texas. Please
For events that require registration/certi

cation/entry contact your county Extension agent for more
during the summer prior to the beginning of the 4-H year, information about projects or activities.
County Extension agents may sign entry forms for events
that will occur during the 4-H year for youth who will
County projects/activities
become eligible for and enroll in 4-H on September 1, but Some counties offer additional projects of local
these youth may not participate in 4-H competitive events interest. Check with your own county to see
and activities until September 1. what is available. Counties provide the materials
and training guides for these projects, and they
Zero-based enrollment
may vary from area to area depending on local
For accountability purposes and the requirement for resources and needs.
keeping mailing lists updated, the Texas 4-H Program uses
zero-based enrollment. This means that at the start of every
Events and activities
new 4-H year, previous members and volunteers and new Youth competing in state, district and/or county
members and volunteers must enroll or re-enroll in the 4-H events and activities must be 9, or 8 AND in the
Program. 3rd grade, to 18 years of age. See speci

c state
contest packet information for additional details.
Cross-county memberships
Youth must be enrolled in the project during the
Membership cannot be held simultaneously in more than current year in order to participate or compete in a
one county or state, but membership may change with related event or activity.
residence as long as the member competes in a given
project in only one county or state. Exception: If it is
more convenient, desirable or logical for a 4-H member
or Clover Kid to belong to 4-H in an adjacent county,
he or she may do so if both agents involved agree. The
agreement should be in writing. In addition, crossing
county lines requires either changing membership from
the home to the host county or participating in the project
in the host county but representing the home county in
events and activities. This agreement of cross-county
membership must be renewed annually between the
involved county Extension staff and the 4-H member.

Texas 4-H and Youth Development

Page 3

2008-2009 Texas 4-H Clover

Considerations in selecting a 4-H project:
Select a project you like.
Select a project that can be completed.
Consider the money it will take. Can parents/guardians
help?
Consider the space and equipment that you have at home.
Consider the time the project will take.
Consider parental support for the project.
Be aware of the opportunities for growth in this project.
A 4-H project should be fun, serve a purpose, and be worth
the effort.
Select only the number of projects you can complete.
Items available to help you learn about your project:
4-H project promotional brochures
Project training workshops
Tours
Exhibits
Contestsjudging, visual presentation and 4-H recordbooks
Reputable web sites
slaoGWhen you write down your goals and plans, you have already
made a step toward reaching those goals. Your written goals will
help you keep track of where you are going and how you are go-
ing to get there. Write your goals and plans for each project. Use
the Member Achievement Plan (M.A.P.) or a method that works
for your family to keep track of progress made toward goals.
Your project goals should include the following:
Knowledge goals - things you want to learn.
Skill goals - things you want to raise, make and/or do.
Leadership goals - things you want to do and to teach others.
Community Service goals - things you want to do for others.
As you get older or become more advanced in your
project(s), you will want to set goals in the following areas:
Energy goals - how your project relates to energy and ways
to save natural resources.
Economic goals - what you will do to save and make money.
Experiment and research goals - studies and experiments
you can conduct in your project.
Career goals - studies and interviews.
Other goals - workshops or contests you plan to participate
in through your project.
Guidelines that relate to all projects:
Make a set of project goals (refer to Member Achievement
PlanMAP).
Complete certain goals each monthmost project work is
done at home.
Keep a record of goals completed.
Exhibit project work.
Enter a contest at the local and county levels.
Attend workshops on your particular project.
Attend 4-H meetings regularly.
Complete 4-H MAP and/or recordbook each year.

Texas 4-H and Youth Development

Develop leadership by teaching other interested
persons something about your project.
Carry out community service activities related to
your 4-H project.
Continue to study and broaden project knowledge
and skills.
Find out what you can learn and do in your projects:
1. Knowledge - things to do and resources to use in
developing knowledge of your project.
Read the 4-H Clover.
Surf the Web for reputable, non-biased
sources.
Read library books related to projects.
Read magazines or journals.
Purchase literature related to projects.
Secure owners manual.
Attend workshops related to your project.
Interview someone who is knowledgeable
about your project subject matter.
Tour places related to the project.
Develop a research paper related to project.
Subscribe to magazines.
Go on

eld trips to study project.
Study careers related to your project.
Study catalogs.
Take correspondence course related to project.
Study history related to your project.
Attend summer workshops through local
community colleges or community education
programs.
2. Skills - the doing part of 4-H in which you develop
your skills to your potential.
Make several things related to your project.
Raise and properly care for something related
to your project.
Repair things related to your project.
Make a list of skills related to your project and
practice them.
Use computer skills to

nd related credible
web sites or maintain records of your own
project on the computer.
3. Safety - part of almost every 4-H project.
Purchase safety equipment.
Make a safety plan (locating safety hazards).
Participate in a safety clinic.
Make a study of accidents related to your
project.
Study state and national safety laws related to
your project.
Use warning signs where necessary.
Secure a safe place to work. Follow all safety
recommendations.
4. Leadership - also a part of every 4-H project. It is
your duty as a 4-H member to develop leadership
skills.
Present and display in schools and your

Page 4

2008-2009 Texas 4-H Clover

community to promote your project.
Assist individual members with their projects.
Conduct interviews.
Help plan and conduct workshops about your project.
Serve as chair of your project group.
Teach groups about project work.
Organize a 4-H project club.
Conduct project contests in the local 4-H club.
Assist volunteer leader with project.
Set up a project tour for your club.
Assist with county contests.
Serve as a project leader for your club.
Recruit new club members into your project.
Write an article for your local newspaper.
Serve as a group leader during a workshop or tour.
Assist with county exhibit days
Secure a county donor for your 4-H project.
Teach disabled children about your project.
Write and give speeches about your project.
Develop a business related to your project.
Serve on a committee related to your project.
Write news articles about your project.
Make exhibits that tell other people about your project.
Appear on TV and/or radio and talk about your project.
Write an information sheet about your project and use it
as a handout during workshops.
Develop a slide set or video about a certain part of your
project.
Serve as a teen or junior leader.
5. Citizenship and Community Service - part of every project,

or Citizenship can be a project by itself. Each 4-H member
should incorporate several activities or experiences
of citizenship and community service in each project in

which they enroll. These experiences can be done as an

organized group/club or as an individual. Discuss ways you

can work in your community to promote a part of your
project through associations and private businesses.
Make the public aware of the economic importance.
Write your state and national legislators about issues
related to your project.
Give something related to your project to shut-ins.
Secure pen pals who are interested in the project.
Discuss project issues with local of

cials.
Write project donors, thanking them for their support.
Sell a product from your project and use the money for
some worthy cause.
Assist friends and neighbors with work related to your
project.
Make speeches about the importance of your project to
the economy, society or school.
Provide transportation for others to a project workshop.
Organize a campaign to improve something related to
your project.
Conduct a radio program on your project, making the
community aware of an issue.
During National 4-H Week, do some type of project
promotion.

Texas 4-H and Youth Development

Page 5

Take pictures of other 4-Hers project exhibits, and use
the pictures for publicity.
Report to the proper authority things that you see in
your project that are dangerous to people of
the community.
Do volunteer work related to your main project.
Serve on a county or community committee that is
related to the project.
Loan something that you have related to your project.
6. Environmental Stewardship
Study how your project relates to conserving our
natural resources.
Share stewardship information with others in your
project area.
7. Economics
Study consumer reports about your project.
Watch television. Listen to the radio for economic news
related to the project.
Conduct your own price study.
Make a study of how to cut cost and maintain quality.
Compare cost of project materials to cost of buying a



nished project.
8. Experiments
Develop your own design.
Compare the outcome of more than one item, using
different ingredients.
Invent something that is useful in your project.
Conduct experiments related to your project.
9. Careers
Study careers related to your project.
Tour businesses related to your project and volunteer at
a local business.
Attend seminars about careers.
Interview people in different careers related to the
project.
Write several colleges and universities concerning
careers related to the project.
Start your own personal business related to your
project.
Find entrepreneurial ideas and resources on the Web.
Talk to an economic development leader or visit the
nearest small business development center.
Do you need help? Secure help from the following:
Your 4-H club manager
Your 4-H project leader
Texas AgriLife Extension Service staff
Retired senior citizens in your community
Professional people with careers related to your project
Businesses related to your project
School teacher, principal, or counselor.
When is the project over?
When you have met the goals you set at the beginning of the
year, and when a Member Achievement Plan has been submitted
to the 4-H project leader, club manager, or county Extension
of

ce, you have

nished your project.

2008-2009 Texas 4-H Clover

AADULTS
- see Volunteer
AFTER SCHOOL
Texas 4-H provides an extensive resource, YEA! 4-H, for use by
clubs and after school programs. This project and curriculum
provides opportunity for volunteers and leaders to provide
programming for youth in three age groups: K-2, 3-5, and 6-
8. Each level of the curriculum is available on CD and can be
purchased through the Extension Bookstore.
ALUMNI

FRIENDS AND ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF TEXAS
Contact:
Mrs. Jana Barrett
Coordinator - Friends and Alumni
979-845-1214
jcbarrett@ag.tamu.edu
http://www.texas4hfriends.org.

Texas 4-H Friends & Alumni Association is a state-wide,
nonpro

t association for citizens who believe strongly in the 4-H
program and want to support the youth involved. The program
is not just for Alumni members of 4-H, but anyone that believes
in the value of the 4-H program and wants to help make a
difference. The association is committed to promoting the value
of the 4-H program.
Mission Statement:
To build and foster relationships among Texans who support the
development programs of 4-H and who believe that the future of
our nation depends on the success of reaching todays youth with
the values and opportunities provided through 4-H.
Many past 4-H members have pledged their support to the
Texas 4-H program through their membership in the Texas
4-H Friends & Alumni Association. The membership dues and
corporate sponsorships are used to support 4-H programs in
order to reach their educational goals, provide scholarships for
4-H members to attend camp and other 4-H opportunities, and
provide networking for former 4-H members through collegiate
scholarship programs.

Texas 4-H and Youth Development

Page 6

Each county has access to contact information for the interested
alumnae in their area. These able volunteers stand ready to
support the local 4-H program in a grass roots effort across the
.etats

Levels of membership in the Texas 4-H Friends and Alumni
Association are:
Lifetime Joint $750.00
Lifetime $500.00
Joint (Annual) $ 50.00
Annual $ 30.00
Collegiate $ 15.00
Corporate Giving Levels*
Gold $10,000.00
Silver $ 5,000.00
ABrsosoncziea te $$ 1 , 010500..0000

*Please contact our of

ce for information regarding bene

ts of each level.
AMBASSADORS
The Texas 4-H Ambassador Program aims to project a clear and
accurate image of the Texas 4-H Youth Development Program.
The ambassador program has several speci

c goals:
To tell and show key audiences what the 4-H Youth
Development Program is and who it impacts, so that these
audiences will understand the impact of 4-H on the lives of
young people and will see how it addresses key youth issues

in the community and state.
To develop leadership and communication skills among the
4-Hers selected to make ambassador presentations.
To make families and youth more aware of 4-H and the
bene

ts it offers.
To inform elected of

cials about the 4-H program and get
them involved.
To tell current and potential donors about 4-H and give them
opportunities to support the program efforts that interest
.meht To change or improve the 4-H image among selected
audiences.
To be effective, a 4-H Ambassador Program should include:
Training: teaching ambassadors how to make presentations,
how to represent the organization and how to serve.
Planning: developing both the plan and commitment to it.
Team-centered activities: sponsoring elections, meetings,
recognition, etc.
Program/team management: making assignments, records,
schedules, arrangements, etc.

2008-2009 Texas 4-H Clover

AQUATIC SCIENCE
Printed Resources:
Aquatic Resources Education - 4-H FISH 4-6.22
Investigating Water - Ron Howard (979) 845-1214 (4-H 17-1)
Give Water A Hand - Matt Tarpley (432) 336-8585
Texas Water Conservation Handbook - 4-H CON 5.020
Pond and Stream Safari - item # 147L24 (N4-HC)
Somethings Fishy (school based curricula) (SP-136)
Fishing for Adventure PC-07604 (N4-HC)
Project Experiences:
Texas 4-H Roundup - Open Category Educational Presentation
Texas 4-H Roundup-Natural Resources Educational Presentation
SpecTra - Aquatics (limited to 16 participants)
Sport

shing - Aquatic Ecology Section
Recordbook Category:
Aquatic Science
Career Exploration Opportunities:
Biologist
Aquatic Scientist
Research Assistant
Limnologist
Oceanographer
Environmental Regulatory Specialist
BFEEBPrinted Resources:
4-H Beef Leaders Guide - 4-H AS3-1.025
Managing Beef Cattle for Show (AS 1-2)
Using Expected Progeny Difference (EPD) and Scenarios in
Livestock Judging Contests
Animal Science Skills for Life - 4-HCCS PC-6372
A Guide to Raising Beef Cattle - ST-037-4 (N4-HC)
Your Calf - A Kids Guide to Raising and Showing Beef and
Dairy Calves - # ST-947-8
National 4-H Curriculum (www.n4hccs.org):
Beef 1 - Bite into Beef
Beef 2 - Heres the Beef
Beef 3 - Leading the Charge
Beef Group Helpers Guide
Calf Pattern
Texas A&M Publications (http://animalscience.tamu.edu)
Feeds and Feeding for Junior Beef Cattle Projects
Managing Beef Cattle for Show
Sick Calves: How Do You Know
Texas Show Steer Breed Classi

cation
The Facts on Opta

exx
TM
Use of Preventative and Therapeutic Drugs in Show Animals
Approach to Placing a Market Steer Class

Texas 4-H and Youth Development

Page 7

Breeding Beef Cattle Judging Outline
Evaluating Market Steers from a Grading Standpoint
Livestock Judging Contest Scoring Procedures
Presentation of Oral Reasons
Reasons Terminology for Breeding Cattle
Reasons Terminology for Market Steers
Sample Sets of Livestock Judging Oral Reasons by Former
Members of the TAMU Livestock Judging Teams
Why Judging Beef Cattle is Important
Project Experiences:
Major Texas livestock shows
County shows
Texas 4-H Roundup Beef Educational Presentation
Texas A&M University Beef Cattle Short Course
Spring TAMU Judging Clinics
SpecTra - Ag. & Natural Resources
Beef Quiz Bowl
Contact:
Kevin Chilek, Extension Program Specialist - 4-H
kchilek@ag.tamu.edu 979-845-6800
This activity helps 4-Hers increase their knowledge of beef
cattle and the Texas 4-H Beef Program. Clubs can use this game
show activity as an effective and fun teaching method any
time during the year, even when inclement weather or limited
resources prohibit outdoor activities. 4-H members who do not
own beef cattle can participate. Counties and districts schedule
their Beef Bowls at various times of the year. State 1st and 2nd
place teams advance to national competition. Refer to the 4-H
Quiz Bowl Guide.
Livestock Judging
The three national livestock judging events Texas 4-H youth
can compete in are: North American Livestock Exposition
Louisville, Kentucky, November; American Royal Livestock
Show Kansas City, Missouri, November; and National
Western Livestock Show Denver, Colorado, January. The
top three teams from Texas 4-H Roundup represent Texas on
the national level. Partial donor support may be provided to
eligible teams for each event; however, teams raise money for
the remainder of needed funding. County teams must qualify at
county and district to advance to Texas 4-H Roundup.
Texas A&M University Livestock Judging Camp
Contact:
Dr. Chris Skaggs, Associate Professor
cskaggs@tamu.edu 979-845-7616
The Department of Animal Science and the Texas 4-H &
Youth Development Program annually host the Texas A&M
University 4-H Livestock Judging Camp. The camp is designed
for 4-H youth ages 14-17 that are interested in building their
knowledge about the evaluation principles associated with
marketing and breeding beef, swine, and sheep. Oral reasons,
live grading and the use of performance data will be heavily
stressed. The cost range is $250-$500.

2008-2009 Texas 4-H Clover

Beef Educational Presentation
Contact:
Dr. Andy Herring, Associate Professor
andy.herring@tamu.edu 979-845-5065
Beef demonstration allows 4-H members to give presentations
on all aspects involving the beef industry. Such topics include
reproduction, health care, breeds and breed characteristics, and
other management aspects.
Recordbook Category:
feeBCareer Exploration Opportunities:
Breeding supply consulting service
Arti

cial insemination service
Supply dealer
Processing plant owner
Branding service
Fertilizer dealer
Auctioneer
USDA grader
Show manager
Livestock barn operator/order buyer
Feed lot owner/manager
Breed association representative
Equipment manufacturing and sales
Feed sales/nutritionist
Volunteer Opportunities
Livestock Mentor Program - see Volunteer
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Printed Resources:
Project Experiences:
Open Class Educational Presentation at county, district, and state
levels.
Recordbook Category:
Science and Technology Open Category
Career Exploration Opportunities:
Agronomy
Biophysics
Developmental Biology
Environmental Law
Forensic Entomology
Forestry
Genetic Counseling
Immunology
Medical Practice
Molecular Biology
Neurobiology
Secondary School Teaching
Systematics
Veterinary Medicine

Texas 4-H and Youth Development

Page 8

CSPMACTexas 4-H Teen Leader Retreat

Contact:
Dr. Darlene Locke, Director - 4-H Conference Center
dlocke@ag.tamu.edu 325-784-5483
This educational program focuses on the development of
intensive leadership skills and targets 4-H members age 13 and
older. Young people explore their own leadership styles and
potential and develop plans for implementation at the local,
county and district levels. This workshop is held annually in
January.
Texas 4-H Fall Leadership Retreat
Contact:
Dr. Darlene Locke, Director - 4-H Conference Center
dlocke@ag.tamu.edu 325-784-5483
This educational program is for youth ages 14-19 to enhance
and explore leadership through hands-on workshops and service
opportunities. This workshop is held annually in November.
Summer Programs For Counties
Contact:
Dr. Darlene Locke, Director - 4-H Conference Center
dlocke@ag.tamu.edu 325-784-5483
This program brings counties together for a 3- or 4- day event
planned and implemented by the Texas 4-H Center summer staff.
Counties must provide their own chaperones at a ratio of one
chaperone for every eight youth of the same gender. Recreational
opportunities include shooting sports, archery, canoeing,
swimming, folk dancing, sport

shing, and more. Information is
distributed to county of

ces by October. Sessions are scheduled
in July.
Prime Time
Contact:
Dr. Darlene Locke, Director - 4-H Conference Center
dlocke@ag.tamu.edu 325-784-5483
Prime Time helps youth ages 9 to13 learn interpersonal skills
and develop lifetime friendships. Programming focuses on
educational and recreational experiences, with emphasis on
helping young people understand the opportunities that are
available in the future. Information is distributed to counties via
electronic format. Sessions are scheduled in July.
Junior Leadership Retreat
Dr. Darlene Locke, Director - 4-H Conference Center
dlocke@ag.tamu.edu 325-784-5483
Junior Leadership Retreat provides youth ages 9-13 a state level
leadership development experience. Workshops, facilitated
by Texas 4-H Council and other senior level 4-H youth,
are on leadership, group dynamics, leading recreation, etc.
Additionally, youth experience service opportunities. Workshop
conducted annually in November.

2008-2009 Texas 4-H Clover

SpecTra
Contact:
Dr. Darlene Locke, Director - 4-H Conference Center
dlocke@ag.tamu.edu 325-784-5483
Special Training in Spectacular Tradition (SpecTra) is the
focus of this program targeting youth ages 14 to 18. A four-
fold objective is addressed: project enhancement; leadership
development; self-image enrichment; and career exploration.
Participants have 20 hours of intensive instruction in a speci

c
program area. Other recreational activities are incorporated to
bring all program areas together. Information is distributed via
electronic format to counties. SpecTra is held on odd-numbered
years in July.
Texas 4-H Center Summer Staff Opportunities
Contact:
Dr. Darlene Locke, Director - 4-H Conference Center
dlocke@ag.tamu.edu 325-784-5483
Texas 4-H is known for the quality of youth leadership that
comes from the program. These youth are valuable resources
at the local, county, district and state levels. The Texas 4-H
Center employs a summer staff to plan, implement and evaluate
programming for summer activities.
Summer staff applicants are not required to have been 4-H
members, but they must have successfully completed one year
of college (this does not include college course work taken
during high school). Applications and information for these
positions are distributed to county of

ces by January. Interviews
are conducted in February and March. All summer staff are
required to participate in a two-week intensive training session
in May. Positions available are Program Assistants, Counselors,
Lifeguards and Aquatics Supervisor.
Memorials and Donations to Camps and/or Texas 4-H
Conference Center
Memorials and donations can be made to the Texas 4-H
Conference Center by individuals and groups/organizations.
Please make donations payable to: Texas 4-H Center, 5600 FM
3021, Brownwood, TX 76801.
Other Camp Opportunities
Contact:
Local county Extension of

ce or district or regional websites for
youth camp experiences.
CHARACTER EDUCATION
Printed Resources:
Character Counts!
Character Becomes You! (B-6128)
Quality Counts (4-H CHE-1)
Quality Counts Gold (CHE-2)
Texans Building Character
Character Counts www.charactercounts.org
Auto B Good - www.studentsbgood.com
Character Classics www.characterbuilding.com

Texas 4-H and Youth Development

Page 9

Project Experiences:
Quality Counts
Contact:
Kevin Chilek, Extension Program Specialist - 4-H
kchilek@ag.tamu.edu 979-845-6800
This curriculum was developed through a partnership between
Texas AgriLife Extension Service and Texas FFA. Quality
Counts is a comprehensive program for all 4-H and FFA
members in Texas who are involved in the youth livestock
program. Texas has the largest number of 4-H and FFA livestock
projects in the nation. Quality Counts is designed to teach
young people the importance of displaying good character in
carrying out livestock projects and in every aspect of their lives.
This curriculum will also help youth learn the importance of
using proper livestock management practices so that food quality
and safety are preserved.
Recordbook Category:
Personal Development/Leadership Open
Career Exploration Opportunities:
County Extension Agent
Agri-Science Teacher
School Teacher
Community Volunteer
Mentor
CITIZENSHIP
Printed Resources:
County Government Guide (under revision with release in 2009)
National 4-H Curriculum (www.n4hccs.org):
Citizenship Adventure Kit
Citizenship Guides Handbook
Project Experiences:
Texas 4-H Congress
Contact:
Dr. Toby L. Lepley, Extension 4-H and Youth Development Specialist
tlepley@ag.tamu.edu 979-845-1212
This mock legislative educational event is held in Austin in
even-numbered years. During the week-long program, senior
4-H youth experience the legislative process

rst hand. By
role-playing senators, representatives, lobbyists and press corps
members, youth are exposed to the full political scene. Activities
range from debating bills in the actual Texas Legislature
chambers to socializing with advocates and opponents at evening
receptions. Youth return to their communities with a better
understanding of how our state government works. Information
is sent to county Extension of

ces in the Fall preceding the event
.raeyNational County Government Week
Contact:
National Association of Counties
www.naco.org
2009: April 19-25
2010: April 18-24
National County Government Week (NCGW) is an annual

2008-2009 Texas 4-H Clover

celebration of county government. First held in 1990, the
goal of county government week is to raise public awareness
and understanding about the roles and responsibilities of the
nations counties. There are activities at the national, state
and local levels during county government week. More than
1,000 counties annually participate in NCGW by holding
a variety of programs and events. These include tours of
county facilities, presentations in schools, meetings with
businesses and community leaders, recognition programs for
volunteers, brie

ngs on environmental projects, and adoption of
proclamations.
Patriotism through Preparedness (B 6179)
Contact:
Dr. Jeff Howard, Associate State Leader - 4-H
jhoward@ag.tamu.edu 979-845-6533
Patriotism through Preparedness, is a disaster preparedness
program developed for youth. Disasters can cause children to
experience many different feelings, especially fear and sadness.
Allowing children to actively participate in a family disaster plan
is an excellent way to build their con

dence and may help them
cope better with their feelings in the event of a disaster. The
curriculum was developed to help parents and youth/children
bond together in preparing for an emergency and/or disaster.
Recordbook Category:
Citizenship and Civic Education
Career Exploration Opportunities:
Elected Of

cial
Social Worker
First Responder (Police Of

cer, EMT, Fire

ghter)
CLOTHING AND TEXTILES
Printed Resources:
Clothes that Click (FCS 2-2)
Clothing Capers (FCS 2-1)
Clothing Quality Standards (E-403)
Food & Fiber Curriculum
National 4-H Curriculum (www.n4hccs.org)
Sewing - Group Activity Helpers Guide
Sewing - Lets Sew Book
Sewing 1 - Under Construction
Sewing 2 - Fashion Forward
Sewing 3 - Re

ne Design
Yea 4-H! 6-8, Designers Choice
Project Experiences:
Fabric & Fashion Design Competition
Contact:
Angela McCorkle, Extension Assistant
armccorkle@ag.tamu.edu 979-845-3850
The Fabric and Fashion Design Competition allows 4-H
members to demonstrate skills in developing ideas and sketching
designs. The three categories are accessory design, apparel
design and textile design.

Texas 4-H and Youth Development

Page 10

Senior district winners who advance to the state competition
will need to accompany their entries to Texas 4-H Roundup.
An interview will be part of the contest and 4-H youth must
attend Roundup to participate in this interview. The forms and
entry information are available from the Extension Family
Development and Resource Management of

ce or your county
Extension agent. Additional information can be found in the 4-H
Clothing Program Annual Packet. Entries are due in the state
4-H of

ce with all other Roundup materials in May. Winning
designs will be displayed throughout Roundup.
Fashion Show
Contact:
Angela McCorkle, Extension Assistant
armccorkle@ag.tamu.edu 979-845-3850
The 4-H Fashion Show allows members to exhibit skills
developed in their clothing projects, including application of
knowledge of

bers and fabrics to wardrobe selection; clothing
construction or comparison shopping; fashion interpretation and
understanding of style; good grooming and poise; and modeling
and presentation of themselves and their garments at the county,
district and state levels. The Fashion Show has two divisions,
buying and construction.
The four categories in each division are casual, dressy, formal
and specialty. Garments entered at the state level that meet
speci

c

ber requirements may also be entered in the Natural
Fiber Competition. Senior district winners in each category in
both divisions compete at the state level. The State 4-H Fashion
Show is held during Texas 4-H Roundup. Entry information is
due to the state 4-H of

ce on the same date as all other Roundup
materials.
Narrator Contest
Contact:
Angela McCorkle, Extension Assistant
armccorkle@ag.tamu.edu 979-845-3850
Narrators for the Texas 4-H Fashion Show are selected through
videotape competition. Narrators are not required to have
experience in clothing projects, although familiarity with fashion
terms is helpful. Fashion Show contestants may not be narrators
at the state level.
Stage Design Contest
Contact:
Angela McCorkle, Extension Assistant
armccorkle@ag.tamu.edu 979-845-3850
A Stage Design contest is held as part of the Texas 4-H Fashion
Show. A team of up to nine 4-H youth and a coach will be
selected to design and decorate the stage for the Fashion Show.
Those chosen may not participate in the Fashion Show or the
Narrator Contest.
Clothing Camp
Contact:
Angela McCorkle, Extension Assistant
armccorkle@ag.tamu.edu 979-845-3850
Clothing Camp is held in Dallas and emphasizes career

2008-2009 Texas 4-H Clover