//img.uscri.be/pth/0646a1786bc68b74b7440e2e200456e0fe1fd09f
Cet ouvrage fait partie de la bibliothèque YouScribe
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le lire en ligne
En savoir plus

The exercise of moral imagination in stigmatized work groups

De
13 pages

This study introduces the concept of moral imagination in a work context to provide an ethical approach to the controversial relationships between dirty work and dirty workers. Moral imagination is assessed as an essential faculty to overcome the stigma associated with dirty work and facilitate the daily work lives of workers. The exercise of moral imagination helps dirty workers to face the moral conflicts inherent in their tasks and to build a personal stance toward their occupation. Finally, we argue that organizations with dirty work groups should actively adopt measures to encourage their employees’ exercise of moral imagination. This study investigates how organizations might create conditions that inspire moral imagination, particularly with regard to the importance of organizational culture as a means to enhance workers’ moral sensitivity. Furthermore, this investigation analyzes different company practices that may derive from a culture committed to moral imagination.
Springer
Journal of Business Ethics, sep 2010, v. 96, n. 1, p. 135–147
Journal of Business Ethics
Voir plus Voir moins
TheExerciseofMoralImagination inStigmatizedWorkGroups
ABSTRACT.Thisstudyintroducestheconceptofmoral imaginationinaworkcontexttoprovideanethical approachtothecontroversialrelationshipsbetweendirty workanddirtyworkers.Moralimaginationisassessedas anessentialfacultytoovercomethestigmaassociatedwith dirtyworkandfacilitatethedailyworklivesofworkers. Theexerciseofmoralimaginationhelpsdirtyworkersto facethemoralconflictsinherentintheirtasksandtobuild apersonalstancetowardtheiroccupation.Finally,we arguethatorganizationswithdirtyworkgroupsshould activelyadoptmeasurestoencouragetheiremployees’ exerciseofmoralimagination.Thisstudyinvestigateshow organizationsmightcreateconditionsthatinspiremoral imagination,particularlywithregardtotheimportanceof organizationalcultureasameanstoenhanceworkers’ moralsensitivity.Furthermore,thisinvestigationanalyzes differentcompanypracticesthatmayderivefromaculture committedtomoralimagination. KEYWORDS:moralimagination,dirtywork,moral conflicts,stigma,workgroups
Introduction Ithinksome[parents]aredisappointedwhenyousay you’regoingintopsychiatricnursing.(citedinWells etal., 2000 ,p.84) Negativeandstigmatizingassessmentsregarding mentalhealthnursingdiscreditthevaluablecontri butionsofmentalhealthnurses;butmoreimpor tantly,thesebeliefsdiscounttheneedsofpeople whorequireaccesstomentalhealthcare.Oermann andSperling( 1999 )observethat,unfortunately, recruitmentofpsychiatricpractitionersisnotkeep ingpacewiththegrowingneedamongthementally ill,perhapsbecauseofitsnegativesocietalrejection. Ingeneral,societycensurescertainoccupationsor themethodsemployedintheirexercise;moral

EstherRoca
controversygeneratedbysuchjobstriggersastigma fortheirpractitioners.Thesecontroversialoccupa tions,includingmentalhealthjobs,provokeques tionsabouttheirlegitimacyandaggressivereactions fromsomemembersofsociety.Forvariousreasons, seeminglyverydifferentprofessions,suchasgrave diggersorexoticdancers,requiretheirpractitioners todefendtheircareerchoices. Hughes( 1951 )referstotheseverydiverseand stigmatizedoccupationsas‘‘dirtywork,’’atermhe definesasoccupationslikelytobeperceivedasdis gustingordegradingbywidersociety.Thedefinition includesalltasksthatseemphysically,psychologically, ormorallytainted,becausesocietyviewsthespecific characteristicsofthosejobs,aswellasthecontro versiesthatoftensurroundthem,asreasonstodevalue suchoccupations.Theresultingsocialrejectionmay affecttheselfperceptionofpeoplewhoworkinthese .sboj Socialscienceresearchonstigmatizationhas grownsignificantlyinthepastthreedecades,par ticularlyinsocialpsychologyrealms.Therolesthat peopleplayatworkandthegroupsandorganiza tionswithwhichtheyaffiliateofferpotentially powerfulsourcesofstigmatization,accordingto socialpsychologists,sociologists,andorganizational theorists(Goffman, 1963 ;LinkandPhelan, 2001 ; Paetzoldetal., 2008 ).Muchresearchreliesoneth nographicandorganizationalidentityfindingsthat indicatethatdirtyworkersareacutelyawareofthe stigmaassociatedwiththeiroccupations(Bolton, 2005 ;Tracy, 2004 ).Inturn,theyhavestudiedthe ambivalentstancetowardtheirworkthatmanydirty workersadopt,andproposediversesolutionsto transformitsmeaningandmitigatetheimpactofthe pervasivestigmasontheiridentity(Ashforthand Kreiner, 1999 ).Ingeneral,theseworkersseekto buildapersonalresponseandstancetowardtheir