Best thoughts and discourses of D.L. Moody : the work of Moody and Sankey as evangelists, with sketches of their lives ...

Best thoughts and discourses of D.L. Moody : the work of Moody and Sankey as evangelists, with sketches of their lives ...

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LM&HTLMOODT. lEAI), SAKTRET, COZZTMSIAJV JEJ^ITIOJV. BEST THOUGHTS AND DISCOURSE 0^ D. L. Moo The Iforfc Ji^foody andof Sankeyas£JrangelistSy with Sketches their' Z^ives aridof ^orti^aits o?i Steel, ABBIE MORROW.CLEMENS Introduction by Rev. Emory J. Haynes. New Yoke: N. TIBBALS & SONS, PUBLISHERS, 37 Park Row. 1876. Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1876, by TIBBALS SONS,N. & In the office of the Librarian of Congress, Washington, D. C. ST. JOHNLAND STEREOTYPE FOUNDKY, SUFFOLK CO., N. T. Introduction, By Eev. Emory J. Haynes. In the brief space since D. L. Moody and Ira. D. Sankey began to attract more than local attention, their lives have been sketched and scraps of their personal history written to an extent at which the most avid craving for notoriety could not murmur. But, in point of fact, even the general pubUc seems to have been convinced ofwhat the personal friends of these two men theirearly felt assured, that notoriety constituted no part of aim. This form of personal aggrandizement was as foreign or ease, the sight-seeing of travel,to their purpose as money, or pampering hospitality.

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LM&HTLMOODT. lEAI), SAKTRET,COZZTMSIAJV JEJ^ITIOJV.
BEST THOUGHTS
AND
DISCOURSE
0^
D. L. Moo
The Iforfc Ji^foody andof Sankeyas£JrangelistSy with
Sketches their' Z^ives aridof ^orti^aits o?i Steel,
ABBIE MORROW.CLEMENS
Introduction by Rev. Emory J. Haynes.
New Yoke:
N. TIBBALS & SONS, PUBLISHERS,
37 Park Row.
1876.Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1876, by
TIBBALS SONS,N. &
In the office of the Librarian of Congress, Washington, D. C.
ST. JOHNLAND
STEREOTYPE FOUNDKY,
SUFFOLK CO., N. T.Introduction,
By Eev. Emory J. Haynes.
In the brief space since D. L. Moody and Ira. D. Sankey
began to attract more than local attention, their lives have
been sketched and scraps of their personal history written to
an extent at which the most avid craving for notoriety could
not murmur.
But, in point of fact, even the general pubUc seems to have
been convinced ofwhat the personal friends of these two men
theirearly felt assured, that notoriety constituted no part of
aim. This form of personal aggrandizement was as foreign
or ease, the sight-seeing of travel,to their purpose as money,
or pampering hospitality. In the community where these
are being written the two comrades have recentlywords
seen thepassed a number ofweeks, seen by the multitude, by
few; watched as they stood before vast audiences, and as they
and from everysat at the firesides and boards of our homes;
point of view they seem as void of personal seeking as human
nature under Divine help can be expected to present itself.
One of them inlbrmed us that when they stepped upon the
platform of their earliest English meeting, working-manthe
drew near to see what might be the trick; for it seemed in-IV INTRODUCTION.
credible that two Yankees should have come so far upon no
selfish errand. **One has an organ and performs on that.
'The other tells stories. Let us see where the make ' comes
in." But they, waiting long in vain for baser revelations,
soon became convicted and converted. If there have been
any, in the two large American cities of their visiting, watch-
ing with such prying and invidious eyes, they also must have
persuaded onlylong .ago been of a holier and pure errand;
for the universal voice in our streets to-day is one of respect,
widening to an affection which glows very warm and change-
less in even thousands of hearts.
It may not be generally known that a sedulous conceal-
ment of such data as is indispensable to any thing like a fair
and experiences, of opinionsbiography—of facts and their
development; which letters and other written record must
furnish for a memoir, a history of the deceased, but which a
man's own lips can alone supply to the annalist ofa yet living
subject—has been the invariable habit of these two Workers.
They have persistently said: "Let us alone. Listen rather
to our message, and lend a hand to help us speak, sing, work
for Jesus."
impossible not to admire such self-abnegation. It isIt is
the coming in of quite a new fashion among modern religion-
like fashion,ists; or rather, all the reproduction of the old;
that old garb which wrapped about and sandaUed and girt
the dusty Apostles of earlier ages. It would seem we ought
respect this reticence and seclusion; and we would, wereto
it not that, so is human nature, concealment heightens curi-
sure win attention, sinceosity; or better, modestworth is to it
is even written; whoso seeketh the lowest seat shall be bid go