Black Partridge, or, The fall of Fort Dearborn

Black Partridge, or, The fall of Fort Dearborn

-

Documents
332 pages
Lire
Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres

Description

P;BLACK OR. THE FALL OF . FORTDEARBO By^ R.GORDONH.COLONEL Frontispiece The Pursuit Page 293 BLACK PARTRIDGE OR THE FALL OF FORT DEARBORN By COLONEL H. R. GORDON " " " "Author of Red Jacket," Logan, Pontiac," etc. NEW YORK E. P. DUTTON & COMPANY 31 West Twenty-third Street Copyright by E. P. DUTTON & Co. 1906 Published September 1906 The Plimpton Press Norwood Mass. U.S A CONTENTS CHAPTER PAGE I. On the Trail to Fort Deaborn ... i II. Pushing to the Northwest 13 III. Woodcraft 25 the Shorerv. On 37 V. Comrades 49 VI. An Exchange of Shots 60 VII. The War Party 72 VIII. An Error of Judgment 84 IX. At Court 98 X. Black Partridge . . . 109 XL The Crisis 120 XII. Companions in Peril 134 XIII. CallA Warning 144 XIV. Stream 156Up XV. The Burns Cabin 168 XVI. OuTM^TTED 180 XVII. Among the Shadows 190 XVIII. Old Friends 200Two XIX. The Fateful Morning 210 XX. Lively Work 220 XXI. The Attack 230 XXII. A Border Heroine 241 XXIII. Through the Fire 249 260XXIV. Behind the Ridge XXV. Private Dugron 270 XXVL 286The Warning Voice XXVIL Conclusion 298 Black Partridge2 The distance between the two posts namedin 1804. nearly two hundred miles, the trail connectingwas marked, and leading around thethem being well southern end of Lake Michigan. It was sometimes the custom for persons making the journey to use a between Fort Dearborn and the southern endcanoe This saved about a fifth of the distanceof the lake. method of travel.

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Ajouté le 30 novembre 2012
Nombre de lectures 26
Langue English
Signaler un problème

P;BLACK
OR.
THE FALL
OF
. FORTDEARBO
By^
R.GORDONH.COLONELFrontispiece The Pursuit Page 293BLACK PARTRIDGE
OR
THE FALL OF FORT DEARBORN
By
COLONEL H. R. GORDON
" " " "Author of Red Jacket," Logan, Pontiac," etc.
NEW YORK
E. P. DUTTON & COMPANY
31 West Twenty-third StreetCopyright by
E. P. DUTTON & Co.
1906
Published September 1906
The Plimpton Press Norwood Mass. U.S ACONTENTS
CHAPTER PAGE
I. On the Trail to Fort Deaborn ... i
II. Pushing to the Northwest 13
III. Woodcraft 25
the Shorerv. On 37
V. Comrades 49
VI. An Exchange of Shots 60
VII. The War Party 72
VIII. An Error of Judgment 84
IX. At Court 98
X. Black Partridge . . . 109
XL The Crisis 120
XII. Companions in Peril 134
XIII. CallA Warning 144
XIV. Stream 156Up
XV. The Burns Cabin 168
XVI. OuTM^TTED 180
XVII. Among the Shadows 190
XVIII. Old Friends 200Two
XIX. The Fateful Morning 210
XX. Lively Work 220
XXI. The Attack 230
XXII. A Border Heroine 241
XXIII. Through the Fire 249
260XXIV. Behind the Ridge
XXV. Private Dugron 270
XXVL 286The Warning Voice
XXVIL Conclusion 298Black Partridge2
The distance between the two posts namedin 1804.
nearly two hundred miles, the trail connectingwas
marked, and leading around thethem being well
southern end of Lake Michigan. It was sometimes
the custom for persons making the journey to use a
between Fort Dearborn and the southern endcanoe
This saved about a fifth of the distanceof the lake.
method of travel.and gave a pleasant change in the
The Indian chief who appeared at Fort Wayne
belonged to the Pottawatomie tribe and was one of
their most famous sachems. He has been called
Black Bird some writers, but is more generallyby
remembered Black Partridge. He had greatas
personally brave andnative force of character, was
along the frontier,was held in high regard, not only
but by our government because of his friendship for
American settlers. His shrewd counsel, his tact, and
his intrepidity saved disaster to the settlements more
once.than
gratitude of our government to thisAs proof of the
brief description ofremarkable Indian, I may give a
which he alwaysthe silver medal presented to him and
wore where it could be plainly seen, pendent from
a cord around his neck. It was once my good fortune
to hold this interesting token in my hands, and I re-
member it clearly. The face contained a bust of
these words:our President, encircled by "James
States, 1809." OnMadison, President of the United