Planning of construction projects [Elektronische Ressource] : a managerial approach / von Nicole Sunke
241 pages
English
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Planning of construction projects [Elektronische Ressource] : a managerial approach / von Nicole Sunke

-

Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres
241 pages
English

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Planning of Construction Projects: A Managerial Approach Zur Erlangung des akademischen Grades eines Doktors der Ingenieurwissenschaften (Dr.-Ing.) vom Fachbereich Bauingenieurwesen der Universität Siegen genehmigte Dissertation von Dipl.-Kffr. Nicole Sunke Referent: Prof. Dr. rer. pol. Frank Schultmann, Universität Siegen Korreferent: Prof. Dr. Jay Yang, Queensland University of Technology Tag der mündlichen Prüfung: 08.06.2009 Siegen, 2009 gedruckt auf alterungsbeständigem holz- und säurefreiem Papier Acknowledgements My supervisor and first reviewer providing a creative environment, support, and the opportunity for research and participation in the international scientific community: Prof. Dr. rer. pol. Frank Schultmann, Universität Karlsruhe (TH) My second reviewer investing time reading and making valuable comments on my thesis: Prof. Dr. Jay Yang, Queensland University of Technoloy, Australia My scientific and organizational support during the last stages of my thesis: Prof. Dr.-Ing. Alfons Goris, Universität Siegen Prof. Dr.-Ing. Monika Jarosch, Universität Siegen Prof. Dr.-Ing. Ulrich Stache, Universität Siegen Prof. Dr.-Ing.

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Publié par
Publié le 01 janvier 2009
Nombre de lectures 13
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 1 Mo

Exrait


Planning of Construction Projects:
A Managerial Approach



Zur Erlangung des akademischen Grades eines
Doktors der Ingenieurwissenschaften
(Dr.-Ing.)

vom Fachbereich Bauingenieurwesen
der Universität Siegen

genehmigte
Dissertation

von
Dipl.-Kffr. Nicole Sunke

Referent: Prof. Dr. rer. pol. Frank Schultmann, Universität Siegen
Korreferent: Prof. Dr. Jay Yang, Queensland University of Technology

Tag der mündlichen Prüfung: 08.06.2009

Siegen, 2009 gedruckt auf alterungsbeständigem holz- und säurefreiem Papier

Acknowledgements




My supervisor and first reviewer providing a creative environment, support,
and the opportunity for research and participation in the international scientific
community:
Prof. Dr. rer. pol. Frank Schultmann, Universität Karlsruhe (TH)


My second reviewer investing time reading and making valuable comments on
my thesis:
Prof. Dr. Jay Yang, Queensland University of Technoloy, Australia


My scientific and organizational support during the last stages of my thesis:
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Alfons Goris, Universität Siegen
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Monika Jarosch, Universität Siegen
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Ulrich Stache, Universität Siegen
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Jürgen Steinbrecher, Universität Siegen


My friends, visible and invisible support (not just with respect to my mega-
project):
Austin Amysan, Irina Apeykina, Lasse Asbach, Martin Bouzaima,
Hayál Coelen, Michael Haasis, Andreas Hoffmann, Birgit Hoffmann,
René Lange, Sebastian Schindler


My family, in good times and in bad times:
My mother, my father, my grandma, Bernadette, Tobias, Andreas, Irina,
Katrin


Lars Gollenbeck




Thank you! Table of contents I
Table of contents
List of figures V
List of tables VII
List of abbreviations IX

1 Introduction 1
1.1 Problem definition 1
1.2 Objectives and research design 3
2 Characteristics of the construction industry 7
2.1 Peculiarities of the construction, its products, and its production processes 7
2.2 Economic relevancy of the construction industry in Europe and Germany 11
2.3 Structure of the construction supply chain 12
2.4 Stakeholders and their objectives 16
3 Planning in construction 19
3.1 Characteristics of construction projects and project delivery systems 19
3.2 Current practice in construction planning 28
3.2.1 Project schedule and construction project planning approaches 29
3.2.2 Performance of construction projects 32
3.3 Resource oriented project planning in construction 35
3.3.1 Project planning approaches for repetitive projects 36
3.3.2 for generalized projects 37
3.3.3 Common versus resource-constrained project planning 38
3.4 Development of procurement strategies for project resources 40
3.4.1 Characterization of resources for project execution 40
3.4.2 Classification scheme for project resources 43
3.4.3 Strategies for providing resources 46
3.4.4 Strategies for the mitigation of resource criticality 46
3.5 Discussion of results 48
4 A concept for capacity oriented construction project planning 51
4.1 Development of an approach for hierarchical project planning 51
4.1.1 Hierarchical production planning and related decision levels in enterprises 51
4.1.2 A hierarchical project planning approach 54
4.1.2.1 Methodology 54
4.1.2.2 Fields of application 57
II Table of contents
4.2 Possible applications of resource-constrained project scheduling in construction 58
4.2.1 A generalized resource-constrained project scheduling model 58
4.2.2 Alternative processing modes of construction activities 63
4.2.3 Multiple simultaneous construction projects 66
4.2.4 Measures for construction project performance 68
4.2.4.1 Construction project duration 68
4.2.4.2 Construction project profit 69
4.2.4.3 Construction project resource utilization 71
4.2.4.4 Construction project sustainability 71
4.2.5 Interests of different project stakeholders 72
4.2.6 Construction project planning with uncertainties 72
4.2.7 Further construction project particularities 74
4.2.8 Solution procedures and applications in construction project planning 75
4.3 Discussion of results 76
5 Proposition for the design and operation of construction supply chains 79
5.1 Challenges for the design and operation of construction supply chains 79
5.2 Supply chain management in manufacturing industries 80
5.2.1 Definitions of supply chain management 80
5.2.2 Framework for strategic and operational supply chain management 83
5.2.2.1 Supply chain design 84
5.2.2.2 Supply chain operations 86
5.3 Adoption of supply chain management to construction 88
5.3.1 Characteristics of construction supply chain management 88
5.3.2 Existing work on construction supply chain management 89
5.3.3 Construction supply chain design 90
5.3.4 Construction supply chain operations 94
5.4 Impacts on the design and operation of construction supply chains 99
5.4.1 Logistic systems for material delivery 99
5.4.2 Material and component characteristics 100
5.5 Discussion of results 101
6 Sustainable end-of-life management of construction products 103
6.1 Need for sustainability 103
6.2 Construction and demolition waste as an example 105
6.2.1 Classification of construction and demolition waste 105
6.2.2 Accomplishments of construction and demolition waste recovery in Germany 106 Table of contents III
6.2.3 Laws and regulations in Germany 111
6.2.4 Product recovery management in construction 114
6.2.4.1 Challenges in product recovery and related work 114
6.2.4.2 Terminology of recovery strategies for materials and components 115
6.2.4.3 Limitations of product recovery 120
6.2.4.4 Measuring the advantageousness of product recovery 121
6.3 Closed-loop supply chain management 122
6.3.1 Closed-loop supply chains 122
6.3.2 General drivers for the establishment of closed-loop supply chains 123
6.3.3 Reverse logistics 125
6.3.3.1 Phases of reverse logistics 125
6.3.3.2 Existing work on reverse logistics 127
6.3.3.3 Characteristics of product returns 128
6.3.3.4 Collection systems 129
6.3.3.5 Reverse chain actors 132
6.4 Discussion of results 132
7 Planning models for reverse logistics operations in construction 135
7.1 General structure of the reverse logistic planning problem in construction 136
7.2 Implications for the use of site storage space and vehicle capacities 141
7.2.1 Constraints on site storage space 141
7.2.2 Constraints on vehicle capacities 145
7.3 Contractor’s multi vehicle multi material assignment problem for bulk material 147
7.3.1 General model formulation 147
7.3.2 Multi vehicle multi material assignment problem with consolidated storage 151
7.4 Waste management company’s vehicle assignment problem for bulk material 152
7.4.1 Single contractor vehicle assignment problem with setup times 154
7.4.2 Multiple contractor vehicle assignment problem with setup times 155
7.5 Waste management company’s roll-on roll-off planning problem for bulk material 158
7.6 anagement company’s vehicle routing problem for low volume material 160
7.6.1 Vehicle routing problem with time windows 161
7.6.2 Multi day vehicle routing problem with time windows 165
7.7 Waste management company’s inventory routing problem for
low volume material 169
7.8 An approach for integrated project and vehicle routing planning 170
7.9 Discussion of results 173 IV Table of contents
8 Energy-oriented end-of-life management 175
8.1 The role of energy efficiency in construction 175
8.2 Energetic evaluation of product reuse and recovery 176
8.3 An approach for integrated deconstruction-recovery planning 179
8.3.1 Project planning with energy-time-resource trade-offs 180
8.3.2 Integrated deconstruction-recovery model 182
8.4 Discussion of results 184
9 Summary and outlook 187
10 Zusammenfassung (German) 191

References i
Appendix xxvii
Construction and demolition waste classification according to the
European Waste Catalogue (EWC) xxvii


List of figures V
List of figures
Figure 1: Segments of the construction industry 8
Figure 2: Typical building life cycle 10
Figure 3: Generic configuration of a supply chain in manufacturing 13
Figure 4: Typical configuration of a construction supply chain 14
Figure 5: CSC relationship model 15
Figure 6: The myriad of construction supply chains 16
Figure 7: Traditional design-bid-build delivery system 22
Figure 8: Agency construction manager delivery system 23
Figure 9: At-risk construction ma 24
Figure 10: Project manager delivery system
Figure 11: Document and construct relationship chart 25
Figure 12: Separate prime contracts relationship chart 26
Figure 13: Project management life cycle 30
Figure 14: Two-dimensional classification 44
Figure 15: Resource classification 45
Figure 16: Decomposition of a project 52
Figure 17: Hierarchical project planning approach 55
Figure 18: Activity-on-node network for the dismantling of a residential building 59
Figure 19: Time points and periods 60
Figure 20: Supply chain strategies 83
Figure 21: Disposition C&D debris in 2004 108
Figure 22: Disposition road construction waste in 2004 109
Figure 23: Disposition of excavated earth in 2004
Figure 24: Applications for recycling construction material 110
Figure 25: Product recovery management in the manufacturing industries 116
Figure 26: Recovery strategies in the building construction sector 118
Figure 27: Stages of reverse logistics in the ma 125
Figure 28: Factors impacting collection system design 130
Figure 29: Focus of the reverse logistic planning problem in construction 136
Figure 30: General structure of the material collection problem in construction 137
Figure 31: Material accumulation of activity j (example) 142
Figure 32: Material type accumulation at time t with parallel activities (example) 144
Figure 33: Utilization of storage space by succeeding accumulating material types 152
Figure 34: Types of roll-on roll-off planning problems 159
VI List of figures
Figure 35: Integrated project scheduling and vehicle routing approach 172
Figure 36: Assignment of the ESV to job j in mode m 181