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Race, gender, class, and sexual orientation: intersecting axes of inequality and self-rated health in Canada

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11 pages
Intersectionality theory, a way of understanding social inequalities by race, gender, class, and sexuality that emphasizes their mutually constitutive natures, possesses potential to uncover and explicate previously unknown health inequalities. In this paper, the intersectionality principles of "directionality," "simultaneity," "multiplicativity," and "multiple jeopardy" are applied to inequalities in self-rated health by race, gender, class, and sexual orientation in a Canadian sample. Methods The Canadian Community Health Survey 2.1 (N = 90,310) provided nationally representative data that enabled binary logistic regression modeling on fair/poor self-rated health in two analytical stages. The additive stage involved regressing self-rated health on race, gender, class, and sexual orientation singly and then as a set. The intersectional stage involved consideration of two-way and three-way interaction terms between the inequality variables added to the full additive model created in the previous stage. Results From an additive perspective, poor self-rated health outcomes were reported by respondents claiming Aboriginal, Asian, or South Asian affiliations, lower class respondents, and bisexual respondents. However, each axis of inequality interacted significantly with at least one other: multiple jeopardy pertained to poor homosexuals and to South Asian women who were at unexpectedly high risks of fair/poor self-rated health and mitigating effects were experienced by poor women and by poor Asian Canadians who were less likely than expected to report fair/poor health. Conclusions Although a variety of intersections between race, gender, class, and sexual orientation were associated with especially high risks of fair/poor self-rated health, they were not all consistent with the predictions of intersectionality theory. I conclude that an intersectionality theory well suited for explicating health inequalities in Canada should be capable of accommodating axis intersections of multiple kinds and qualities.
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VeenstraInternational Journal for Equity in Health2011,10:3 http://www.equityhealthj.com/content/10/1/3
R E S E A R C HOpen Access Race, gender, class, and sexual orientation: intersecting axes of inequality and selfrated health in Canada Gerry Veenstra
Abstract Background:Intersectionality theory, a way of understanding social inequalities by race, gender, class, and sexuality that emphasizes their mutually constitutive natures, possesses potential to uncover and explicate previously unknown health inequalities. In this paper, the intersectionality principles ofdirectionality,simultaneity,” “multiplicativity,andmultiple jeopardyare applied to inequalities in selfrated health by race, gender, class, and sexual orientation in a Canadian sample. Methods:The Canadian Community Health Survey 2.1 (N = 90,310) provided nationally representative data that enabled binary logistic regression modeling on fair/poor selfrated health in two analytical stages. The additive stage involved regressing selfrated health on race, gender, class, and sexual orientation singly and then as a set. The intersectional stage involved consideration of twoway and threeway interaction terms between the inequality variables added to the full additive model created in the previous stage. Results:From an additive perspective, poor selfrated health outcomes were reported by respondents claiming Aboriginal, Asian, or South Asian affiliations, lower class respondents, and bisexual respondents. However, each axis of inequality interacted significantly with at least one other: multiple jeopardy pertained to poor homosexuals and to South Asian women who were at unexpectedly high risks of fair/poor selfrated health and mitigating effects were experienced by poor women and by poor Asian Canadians who were less likely than expected to report fair/ poor health. Conclusions:Although a variety of intersections between race, gender, class, and sexual orientation were associated with especially high risks of fair/poor selfrated health, they were not all consistent with the predictions of intersectionality theory. I conclude that an intersectionality theory well suited for explicating health inequalities in Canada should be capable of accommodating axis intersections of multiple kinds and qualities.
Background Sizeable health inequalities by race [1,2], gender [3,4] and class [5] have been recorded in Canada. Consistent with traditional sociological understandings of social inequality, these axes of inequality have for the most part been considered individually, with researchers only considering potential interconnectedness when investi gating whether class mediates associations between race and health or gender and health. Whether class influ ences health differently for visible minority Canadians
Correspondence: gerry.veenstra@ubc.ca Department of Sociology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
and White Canadians or race influences health differ ently for men and women, for example, has not yet been investigated. When statistical interactions such as thesehavereceived analytical attention  for example, whether class influences health differently for Canadian men and women [3]  they have not been adequately theorized. Intersectionality theory, an influential theore tical tradition inspired by the feminist and antiracist tra ditions, demands that inequalities by race, gender, and class (and sexuality as well) be considered in tandem rather than distinctly. This is because these fundamental axes of inequality in contemporary societies are consid ered to be intrinsically entwined; they mutually consti tute and reinforce one another and as such cannot be
© 2011 Veenstra; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.