The care of destitute, neglected, and delinquent children

The care of destitute, neglected, and delinquent children

-

Documents
272 pages
Lire
Le téléchargement nécessite un accès à la bibliothèque YouScribe
Tout savoir sur nos offres

Description

^AeCKREqfDESTnUTB MiCLECTED c?i?^ DiPHQyENT Children AMERICAN PH3LAMTHR0PY OFTHE NINETEENTH CENTU«r Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive in 2007 witii funding from IVIicrosoft Corporation littp://www.arcliive.org/details/careofdestitutenOOfolly^o The Care of andDestitute, Neglected, Delinquent Children BY HOMER FOLKS Superintend^/ the Children's Aid Society Pennsylvania, iSgo-iSgj:of of Secretary the New York StcUe CharitiesAid Association, i8gj-ig02of ; General Secretary the National Conference Charities and Cor-of of rection, igoi-igo2 : Commissioner Public Charities the Cityof of of New York, igo2- THE MACMILLAN COMPANY LONDON : & LTD.CO.. 1907 All rights reserved Copyright, 190a, By the MACMILLAN COMPANY. ReprintedSet up and electrotyped. Published January, 1902. November, 1907. Ncrfoooli Ifixw J. 8. Gushing Co.— Berwick «fe Smith Co. Norwood, Mass., U.S.A. PREFACE of the present series is toThe purpose bring to bear on the practical problems of American social workers a concise knowl- historical evolution throughedge of the which the charities of the country have classification of the subjectpassed. The adopted in the series follows approximately historical order.

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Nombre de lectures 4
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 10 Mo
Signaler un problème

^AeCKREqfDESTnUTB
MiCLECTED c?i?^
DiPHQyENT Children
AMERICAN PH3LAMTHR0PY
OFTHE NINETEENTH CENTU«rDigitized by tine Internet Arciiive
in 2007 witii funding from
IVIicrosoft Corporation
littp://www.arcliive.org/details/careofdestitutenOOfoll<uofto! tije Nineteentlj CenturgSlmerican ^^bilantfjropg
Edited by HERBERT S. BROWN
The Care of Destitute, Neglected
and Delinquent Children••rhg?>y^oThe Care of
andDestitute, Neglected,
Delinquent Children
BY
HOMER FOLKS
Superintend^/ the Children's Aid Society Pennsylvania, iSgo-iSgj:of of
Secretary the New York StcUe CharitiesAid Association, i8gj-ig02of ;
General Secretary the National Conference Charities and Cor-of of
rection, igoi-igo2 : Commissioner Public Charities the Cityof of of
New York, igo2-
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
LONDON : & LTD.CO..
1907
All rights reservedCopyright, 190a,
By the MACMILLAN COMPANY.
ReprintedSet up and electrotyped. Published January, 1902.
November, 1907.
Ncrfoooli Ifixw
J. 8. Gushing Co.— Berwick «fe Smith Co.
Norwood, Mass., U.S.A.PREFACE
of the present series is toThe purpose
bring to bear on the practical problems of
American social workers a concise knowl-
historical evolution throughedge of the
which the charities of the country have
classification of the subjectpassed. The
adopted in the series follows approximately
historical order. At the beginning ofthe
the nineteenth century and in the earlier
colonial days the almshouse, half retributive,
wholly uncharitable, stood (aside from a still
cruder system of outdoor relief copied from
poor law) practicallythe English the sole in-
stitutional representative of society's interest
in its helpless members. In time, however,
hospitals for the segregation of the mentally
defective on the one hand, and for the gen-
eral treatment of the sick on the other, began
to care for some who hitherto had been shel-
tered, if at all, in the almshouse; while the
elaboration of the penal system of the coun-
try effected a somewhat more complete differ-PREFACEVi
cntiation between pauper and criminal, and
introduced the latter as a special object of
philanthropic interest. At the same time
rights of dependentthe needs and childhood
began to receive wider recognition by the
establishment of institutions and societies for
Later on in the century the home,children.
which as a relief centre antedates the alms-
house, became the focus of a new interest,
centre of a reconstructive andas the proper
preventive social effort which has since grown
complexity and magnitude to overshadowin
dominate, with its determination toand to
treat causes rather than results, the whole
philanthropy. In this progress, fromfield of
primitive almshouse, through thethe catch-all
elaborate specialization of palliative charity
has characterized the century, into thewhich
effort which marks its close,era of preventive
unremitting super-has been need ofthere
conserve in their true spirit thevision, to
which our existing insti-charitable ideals for
persistenttutions and systems stand, and of
to arouse and maintaineducational work,
upon which enduringthe public interest
Theprogress in this field is dependent.
in the series is, then,classification adopted
care destituteas follows: Institutional of
the insane,feeble-minded,adults; Defectives: