The philosophy of change; a study of the fundamental principle of the philosophy of Bergson

The philosophy of change; a study of the fundamental principle of the philosophy of Bergson

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT LOS ANGELES THE PHILOSOPHY OF CHANGE MACMILLAN AND CO., Limited LONDON • BOMBAY • CALCUTTA MELBOURNE THE MACMILLAN COMPANY NEW YORK • BOSTON • CHICAGO DALLAS • SAN FRANCISCO CANADA,THE MACMILLAN CO. OF Ltd. TORONTO THE PHILOSOPHY OF CHANGE A STUDY OF THE FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLE PHILOSOPHYOF THE OF BERGSON BY WILDON CARRH. HON. D.LITT. DURHAM, FELLOW OF UNIVERSITY OF LONDON, KING's COLLEGE SECRETARY THE ARISTOTELIAN SOCIETYHON. OF CO., LIMITEDMACMILLAN AND STREET, LONDONST. MARTIN'S 1914 COPYRIGHT 64-5ex PREFACE This book is the outcome of a course of lectures on "" The Philosophy of Bergson delivered in the Uni- "versity of London. The title The Philosophy of "Change v^^as suggested to me by M. Bergson himself ^ as a sub-title for the little volume on his philosophy in ^ The People s Books} It emphasises the fundamental ^ principle of the new philosophy, the principle that change is original. It seems to me that our present generation is witness- ing a w^ide extension of science in directions un-j imagined by, inconceivable the last generation.c\ and to, experiment is openingIn two directions especially hasup realms of reality the existence of vs'hich until of which isnow been unsuspected, and the discovery ^ probably destined to widen immeasurably the horizon of human knowledge and thereby increase indefinitely\ new realms of realityhuman power.

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
AT LOS ANGELESTHE PHILOSOPHY OF CHANGEMACMILLAN AND CO., Limited
LONDON • BOMBAY • CALCUTTA
MELBOURNE
THE MACMILLAN COMPANY
NEW YORK • BOSTON • CHICAGO
DALLAS • SAN FRANCISCO
CANADA,THE MACMILLAN CO. OF Ltd.
TORONTOTHE PHILOSOPHY
OF CHANGE
A STUDY OF
THE FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLE
PHILOSOPHYOF THE OF BERGSON
BY
WILDON CARRH.
HON. D.LITT. DURHAM,
FELLOW OF UNIVERSITY OF LONDON, KING's COLLEGE
SECRETARY THE ARISTOTELIAN SOCIETYHON. OF
CO., LIMITEDMACMILLAN AND
STREET, LONDONST. MARTIN'S
1914COPYRIGHT64-5ex
PREFACE
This book is the outcome of a course of lectures on
"" The Philosophy of Bergson delivered in the Uni-
"versity of London. The title The Philosophy of
"Change v^^as suggested to me by M. Bergson himself
^ as a sub-title for the little volume on his philosophy in
^ The People s Books} It emphasises the fundamental
^
principle of the new philosophy, the principle that
change is original.
It seems to me that our present generation is witness-
ing a w^ide extension of science in directions un-j
imagined by, inconceivable the last generation.c\ and to,
experiment is openingIn two directions especially
hasup realms of reality the existence of vs'hich until
of which isnow been unsuspected, and the discovery
^ probably destined to widen immeasurably the horizon
of human knowledge and thereby increase indefinitely\
new realms of realityhuman power. One of these
beyond the atom,may be fitly described as the world
if that word isthe other is the spiritual (or mental,
and sciencepreferred) reality revealed in the new method
Change is inof psychoanalysis. The Philosophy of
1 Henri Bergson -. The Philosophy Change. (T. C. and E. C. Jack.)of
16C543OF CHANGEvi THE PHILOSOPHY
theagreement and complete harmony withstriking
science in both these experimental fields.extension of
informulation of a new principleThe simultaneous
its confirmation in scientific discoveryphilosophy with
more than coincidence. There ismust be something
and it is certainly not due tono apparent connection,
if a greaterdirect influence. But is it not just as
the presentmind, of which our individual minds are
Itactivity, had brought to consciousness a new idea ^
I havethis idea, the idea of original change, thatis
tried expound in this book.to
this standpoint I have endeavoured to presentFrom
of what seem to me thea clear and concise account
philosophy.definite doctrines worked out in Bergson's
In this task I have been privileged to have the advan-
tage of friendship and personal communication with
Bergson himself. He is in no way responsible forM.
order or the manner in which I have set forththe
which I havethe doctrines nor for the arguments with
supported them, but he has encouraged me by the deep
interest he has shown in the work, and has discussed
with me many of the more difficult problems.
The reason I have devoted so much attention to
problem of the relation body isthe of mind and that
I feel it to be the point of departure for a philosophy
of action. What impresses me is the quite evident
initial determination of M. Bergson to reach a definite
conclusion as to the exact nature of relation, andthat
not, as so many have done, rest satisfied with ato
cautious acceptance of some provisional hypothesis.