The Yeas and nays polled in the Dunkin Act campaign in Toronto [microform] : [ca]refully compared with the official returns : with introductory remarks and extracts of speeches delivered during the campaign

The Yeas and nays polled in the Dunkin Act campaign in Toronto [microform] : [ca]refully compared with the official returns : with introductory remarks and extracts of speeches delivered during the campaign

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Ti kO IS THE £^ fEAS AND NAYS POLLED IN ME DllKlN ACT CAMPAIGN IN TORONTO. REFT I.LT COMPARED WITH THE OFFICIAL RETURNS. WITL' INTRODUCTORY REMARKS AND EXTRACTS OF .^EECHES DELIVERED DDRIN& TEE CAMPAIGN, WITH AN APPENDIX. TOSOIf^TO: "THE "LEADER STEAM JOB PRINTING OFFICE. 1877. f-,#^ LBS "* 1* #•XrEI^^4.CIC The Committee having charge of the publication of this little whilework intended for the use of the trade alone, bespeaking for it the patronage friends, deem it ri^ht to offer rew j)refof their a vtory remarks explanatory of the origin of their connection with it. Shortly after the close of the memorable compaigu which ended in Augustin the rejection of the Dunkin By-law last, a desire was pretty generally for the publication of the names ofexpressed those who voted on the question. At a general meeting of the Licensed Victuallers Association on that 500the 28th September, it was unanimously resolved, copies of " "" "a list of all who and Nay be published.voted Yea Such pubUcation will to a large extent serve the purpose of a City Directory, and has become all the more desirable from the circumstance party said tohavenow inprepara-thattheopposing are tion, a pamphlet designed to exhibit the amount of property and wealth represented by those who voted for the Bill. We arecontent that holdthey possess the majority of dol'ar>>, we a more precious possession, the support of the majority ofT/i^n, theconfidence and bone and sinew of the community.

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Ti
kO
ISTHE £^
fEAS AND NAYS
POLLED IN
ME DllKlN ACT CAMPAIGN
IN TORONTO.
REFT I.LT COMPARED WITH THE OFFICIAL RETURNS.
WITL' INTRODUCTORY REMARKS AND EXTRACTS OF
.^EECHES DELIVERED DDRIN& TEE CAMPAIGN,
WITH AN APPENDIX.
TOSOIf^TO:
"THE "LEADER STEAM JOB PRINTING OFFICE.
1877.f-,#^
LBS
"*1* #•XrEI^^4.CIC
The Committee having charge of the publication of this little
whilework intended for the use of the trade alone, bespeaking for it
the patronage friends, deem it ri^ht to offer rew j)refof their a vtory
remarks explanatory of the origin of their connection with it.
Shortly after the close of the memorable compaigu which ended
in Augustin the rejection of the Dunkin By-law last, a desire was
pretty generally for the publication of the names ofexpressed those
who voted on the question.
At a general meeting of the Licensed Victuallers Association on
that 500the 28th September, it was unanimously resolved, copies of
" "" "a list of all who and Nay be published.voted Yea
Such pubUcation will to a large extent serve the purpose of a
City Directory, and has become all the more desirable from the
circumstance party said tohavenow inprepara-thattheopposing are
tion, a pamphlet designed to exhibit the amount of property and
wealth represented by those who voted for the Bill. We arecontent
that holdthey possess the majority of dol'ar>>, we a more precious
possession, the support of the majority ofT/i^n, theconfidence and
bone and sinew of the community. Let them boast of the money
ipower, we take pride in holding the votim power.
But we dispute, at the same time, their pretensions to the pos-
vsession of of this city. Be that as itthe bulk of the wealth may, our
Opponents ought to appreciate our liberality in printing free of cost
ito them, what they consider thei? minority roll of honour, need we
say how much higherwe prize ourown beyond all comparison ?
We would further how this work has assumedexplain much
larger proportions than originally intended. It will be remembered
that during the progress of the Dunkin agitation, reportsof meetings
and withspeeches on either side were read great avidity by the
ublie at large, and even the interest thus excited is far fromyet
aving died out. Considering how difficult it is to obtain anything
ike an unbroken file of the City dailiesoutside of the printing offices,
t was thought that a condensed collection of reports of the most
interesting gatherings might be worth republishingand addresses in
It more permanent form, and serve in after times, as a reflex of the
Stmtiments and arguments of the chief actors on this stage, a kind
of little Hansard in the shape of a preface to the main record.
While attempting the Committee regret the necessitythis, they
have been under, after collecting materials at considerable pains, of
giving but mere abstracts or outlines of the addresses deUvered.
The at this timebriefest retrospect of thfe situation can only be
ttempted, and in the words of one of the Committee in publica—
tter to the ratepaycs on the 21st of August. " At a time when
e country is suffering from the effects of a prolonged depression
trade the previousand business scarcely paralled in history of
nada, mischievous of many months duration, likea agitation ttie
-inous sounds which precede the hurricane, has at length burst
on you in all its violence, culminating in an extraordinary ele 'on
ich has now the community,for a fortnight convulsed L lU
ar witness that to held responsible for any ofwe are not be the
ils and losses, or for the serious derangement of the businessand
ustries of this city, which have resulted and continue to result
m this In addittion toprolonged and exciting contest. business
rangements, long will scarcely heal the bitterness of feelingyears
allay the animosities between neighbours and friends evoked by
unprovoked conflict."" : — — —
IV. PREFACE.
Early in the sprinpf our opponents seemed arming for a serious
notconflict, but had yet fullv unmasked their batteries. One of
declared theirtheir speakers determination, "to make war upon the
Licensed Victuallers.' Other attacks followed. In answer to these,
two or three vigorous letters from Mr. James Whyte, King Street,
"ofand from the pen a Licensed Victualler," and others, appeared.
Dunkin flag was at length run up, and the following requisitionThe
:—presented in due form, asking for the submission of the Act
" undersigned qualified municipal elect<»rs of the City of Toronto*The
hereby require that a poll be taken in terms of the Ttmpeiance Act of
to detenniiie whether or not the qualifltd municipal elect rs of the18(;4,
willMunicipality adopt, under authorit\ and for the enforcement ofsaid
the By-law propose forsaid Act, followmg. which we hereby theirthe
witadoption, to
*• Hale of intoxicating liquors and the issuing of licenses therefor,The
thei)resent By-law proliibited within the Muiiicii)a]ity of City ofis by the
under authority and for enforcement of the Temperance Act ofToroiito,
1864.
15th June, 1877.
i^igned
John Macdonald, Wm. McMaster,
J. C. Aikins, S. H. Blake,
Patricl< Boyle, George Wright, *
A. M. Smith, Geo. M Rose,
David Millar, Walters. Lee.
Edward Gurney, jnr,, D. McLean,
E. Coatsworth, Alexander GJemmell,
Colnmn,James Browne, E. R
Robert Hay, John Gillespie,
John H. Reid, Lewis Samuel,
Hamilton, 'H. S. Strathy, Wm. B.
John Hallam, Hugh Scott.
O'Reilly,H. Blam, W. T.
Edward Arthur Manley,Beckett,
James Little, James Hughes,
A. H D^mond, John Potts,
D, Blain, . Patri«'k Doyle,
M. O'Connor, E. M. Morphy,
'
V> arren,H. Hewitt, CD.
'M.Bryer, W. P. Howland,T. , :
Thomas .i. Lee, D, H. Read,
"'''
J. K.Kirr, Richard Brown, 'i
W.W. Ogden, ., . W. C. Wilkinson,
JohnW. S, Finch, .. J. Withrow. V:
Previous to, and anticipating this action, the licensed Vict-
^meeting on the 1stuallers Association held a general of June, and
took active steps for more thorough organization. The namea was
merged in the more comprehensiveone of the Anti-Dunkin Associa-
chosen,tion. An executive committee of nine was with full powers
and to collect and expend allto manage the campaign, necessary
:funds : the committee consisted of the following gentlemen
Mess -s. J. Severn, J. Timms, S. Richardson, D. Walker, E.
Cosarrave.G'Keefi, T. McGaw, G. A. Burns, T. Allen, J Mr. D.
Walker, was unanimously appointed Chairman Mr. <)"Keefe, Trea-; i
surer rnd Mr. S Ri'jbardson, Secretary of the Association.;
It wi.s then resolved to prepare at once a counter petition to the
City the subraission of the By-law, and which beingCouncil against
reported and approved, copies were ordered to be printed and circu-
lated under the supervision of special committees, as will more fully
;appear from the following extract
"At a general meeting of the Trade held this day (June 15th), the
:following resolution was unanimously adopted
' Resolved,—That sub committees be now chosen whose duty it shall
be to assi^t in carrying out more thoroughly the views ofthe Association,
conflict with the thein the promoters of .Dunkin Act in Toronto, by
visiting forthwith, every licensed establishment in the city seeing to it;
.that each is supplied with a copy of a petition to the City Council, ascer-
tain the progress m.ide in signing said petitions aiding to obtain addi-;
tional signatures, and generally urging all within the sphere Of their influ-
ence to increased activity and enei^y'ln thework of canvassing the electors
"
to maintain the existing 'icensing law in its integrity.':
.'PREFACE.
WARD COMMITTEES.
with power to nominate.Mr. D. Walker,St Gkoroe'8.—
Win. Wright, — Small,A. Burn.s,St. Lawhknce. -Messrs. G.
VV. Copeland, T. O'Connor. ^ „. ^ ,
Waterhouse, Jas. Wright.Mitchell, RSt. Thomas.—O. A.
McConuel, W. Ledley.E. O'Keefe, M.St. James.—
Geo. Baker, Wni. Armstrong, Wm,St. Anohews.—J. Titnms,
John Wilson.Graham, S. Hunter,
Brewer, Hinchcliflf,Ball, W. J. Collins, J. B.St. Patricks.—J.
Holman.R. Jones, T. Mossop, N.G. Jones,
A. Bums, J. Patterson, JamesMcFar-John's.— R. McCleary,St.
land, J. Oulcott.
David's.—R. Davies, .T. Tillison, Gibson, Abell, Ayre andSt.
Wiggins.
Mallord, T. Scholes.St. Stephen's.—J. Cornell, J.
:—petition ran as followsThe
MAYOR ANDHIS WORSHIP THE COUNCIL OF THE MU-TO
CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF TORONTO :NICIPAL
Petition the Undersigned Ratefayer^ the City of JorontoThe of of
humbly sheweth
itifonneil that certain electorsThat your petitioners are and others of
have requested your Council tothe said Citv of Toronto submit a By-
provisions of the Tem{)erance Act, oflaw, pursuant to the 1864, (commonly
the Diuikin Act,) for the approval of th^• electors of this City.known a:*
And your petitioners re-*V)cctful submit that if such a measurey
were submitted it would be detrimental to bu.siness. and a serious loss to
the inhabitants of the City through the cost that would be entailed in
that under the vote muchits 8ubmi-;3ion, and oj)en animosity and bad
and a fair expression of opinionfeeliiiijf will arise, public cannot be
arrived at.
And your petitioners also respectfully submit that the lart^e amount of
Revenue derived by the City from the issuing of Tavern and Retail 8hop
beLicences is a nutter to seriously considered by your Council in the
when a tax andpresent linancial crisis, rate of nineteen a half mills on the
d tllar levied upon the forhas just been Rvtepayers the current year,
That while the would have to make the above byCity up loss direct taxa-
tion in addition to the ah >ve burdensome rate, our petitioiiers> verily
beUeve that no benefit would accrue to the cjmmunity the passageby of
the said By-law.
ActThat as the Crooks has been the most successful measure so far
only shortadopted, and as it has been a time in operation it should re-
a fair beingceive trial before supplemented by a measure that bas been
for years on our books, and(13) statute wherever brought into force has
l)ioved to be comparatively W'»rthl©ss, and more calculated to increase
r ither than diininish the evils of intemperance, as theevinced by strongest
evidence, more especially the report of the Commission of the Ontario
Government.
Therefore, your petitioners resp^'ctfully submit that the said By-law
slDuld not be submitted to a vote of the electors. And your petitioners
as in duty bound will ever pray."
petitions were returnedThe result wasthat in a short time, the
from ward, aggregate the signatures of 5009 andeach bearing in the
more otbt>naJi t ratepayers of T.oronto, and then presented in due
criurse to the City Council, who decided after deliberation, that they
bad of the By-law to the electo-no power to prevent the submission
livte. Monday was appointed for the opening ofthe 6th of August
tlie poll. Then com uenced an active canvass on both sides. In this
s Tvice the most trusty and agents were employed by our
dailyExecutive Committee, with instructicns to report to the Chair-
men of their while otherswere engaged classifyingrespectivewards,
tlie voters' lists, and registering the results of the returns of the
canvassing agents.
The Dunkin party, on the other hand, were activeand aggressive.
Tliey over severalprojected a series of meetings extending weeks.
About the building on the burntbeginning of Julythey began block,
corner of Yonge and Queen Streets, a kind of Amphitheatre capable
. « 'f seating three to four thousand people, and of giving standing
accommodation to as manymore, with a covered platfonn toaccom-PREFACE.VI.
hundred persons, Althoup^h not rivalling? situation,modate two in
or architt^ctural beauty the Aini)hitheatre of Titus, yet itinugiiitude
served the purpose for many consecutive nights and weeks, of a
for the display theslcill ofconvenient arena of the intellectual gladia-
in wordy conioat on this novel stage. Bands musictors who met of
often in attendance, and the meetings thus partook of thewere
nature of open air concerts varied by speeches.
Committeeat first established theirThe General head quarters in
spacious offices adjoining the main entrance to the Grandthe Opera
house, and only shifted their flag on the eve of the electit>n, to the
drill shed, immediately oppositenear vicinity or the the premises of
Hallam, who on his side, lost no timeMr. John in defiantly
the Dunkin colours over his factory door.hoisting
when firstThe Opera House offlces opened, seemed to attract
of various loungei-s. Among othei*s anthe curiosity adherent of the
party from the country, in search of the Amphitheatre in-Dunkin
" ?"what place is this He was answered mysteriously, thatquired
House Plot he seemed formia was another Rye ; a moment to muse,
on being politely invited to retire, retreated withand then great ex-
as if scenting danger in this dark double entendre.pidition,
Tht' Executive Committee now engaged the services of Mr. E.
lecturer, gentlemanKing D<dds as chieforganizerand a ofmorethan
reputation asajonmalistand publicspeaker.Provincial Hisstirring
eloquence and readiness indebate gairiea him much popularity with
all coarsenessthe masses, and while shunning of invective, his
were not the less incisive and effective whendenunciations occasion
demanded.
We regret ou^ inability to do justice to the merits of the princi-
would ungrateful to passpal oflftce-bearers,T)ut it be in silence the
services of the Chairman, Mr. D. Walker, andvaluable of the Trea-
Mr. E. O'Keefe, gentlemen whose personalsurer, character and
lent weight to tneir public utterances,and to theirstanding, opinions
John Cosgrave debarred by domesticin council. Mr. affliction from
exertions at a critical time, proved himselfpersonal on all other
an efficient and influential worker, and so also ofoccasions, Mr. Geo.
Burns, Mr. Thomas Allen, and Mr. John Timms.A.
aid wr.s also rendered by variousMuch valuable members out-
Executive Committee, who served on specialside the committees
various other ways. Tlie trade and public will notand in readily
the names of Messrs. John Bailey, Mat Evans, Wra.forget Arms-
Mr. Howe, G. Haskings,strong, W. H. Minhinnick, N. Holman, John
Duffey, John Graham, Geo. A. Mitchell,Elliott, Jas. Geo. Jones,
McCleary, W. Stephenson, Geo. Foy, Jas. J Kelly,Robert R. O'Hara,
Laurence, J. Pattei-son, Walter Grant, AbnerBrown, J. Schaeflfer,R.
Whelan, W. Montgomery,A. Eiohorn, W. Bell, J. G. S. Hunter, Jas.
Small, and others.Walsh, P.
Nor should the labours of the assistant organizer, Mr. J. Glad-
8'x)ne Dodds, be ignored a gentleman fertile in expedients; and of
and of note inmuch electioneering experience, the sporting world.
it was who planned and successfully carried out theHe celebrated
Yorkville serenade, which aroused the local hostility of the opposite
offparty, their leader having come "second best " in the legal pro-
unjustifiable aggressivenessceedings to which his gave rise. In a
of Grip, September a good likeness of ourCftrtoon 1, friend will be
found placed pipe in hand, vis a vis with a distinguished member
of the city press.
We have endeavoured to Jvoid all undue strictures on the public
utterances and acts of those gentl<imenwho took the first aggressive
steps, and when the oblo(juy to which we have been subjected, in
connection with our legitimate business is considered, the provoca-
tion to retaliate is confessedly strong ; but to their attacks we have
indifferent, satis^ed that discriminatingleiirned to be quite a public
will recognise in many of their agents, little else than veritable speci-
mens of that froth which the effervescence of the times occasionally
casts upon the surface of politics' troubled waters, and on the crest
Dmikin wave as well.of the
"The earth hatb bubbles as the water hath, and these are of
them "—his friend told Hamlet.
The Association as such is of no political party, and cannot be
compromised any opinionsby reflected from these pages, and for
which the compilers hereof are alone responsible, tneyas likewise
are for any defects of style or of grammar being plain unlettered;
men, theymake no pretensions to skill in bookmaking.—
PBEFACE. VU.
.
now Introduce our readers toWc the accounts of the principal
meetineH and speeches preparatorv to the polling, as condensed
chiefly from the excellent reports of the Mail Newspaper.
After the proceedinj^s at the Citv ourCouncil above narrated,
opponents lost no time m opening their regular campaign in the
shape of mass meetings, the first of which took place under their
on the evening of July 5thauspices, , at St. Andrew's Hall. A large
attendance on both sides. Hall crowded to its utmost capacity.
Vice-Chanckllor Blake occupied the Chair. His remarks as well
those of most of theas other speakers at this and at subsequent
meetings are as follows.
ST. ANDREW'S HALL.-July 6th.
Chairman.—Referred to evidence the lament-Thk exhibiting
able effects of intemperance 40 or 50 hotels, he held, were sufficient;
for the purposes of this city. I^st year, there were no less than
Toronto where in-500 places in liquor was sold. These of course,
groceries but these dens he considered were the greatestcluded ;
bane of the country. He had received numerous letters praying
worstthat he would close up certain grocery stores. Thev were the
in this City. He went in heart for shutting them up.places and soul
they passed the Dimkin Act in Toronto, would be tne knell ofIf it
intemperance throughout the whole of Canada. He exhorted all
to aid in tlieir endeavours joy when thepresent to ring out the bells
Act was passed.Dunkin
Rev. Mr. Hunter,—There was a fire in their midst consuming
was 500ever5'thing that noble and beautiful. That flre was the
sellers of Toronto they were pouring oil upon the devouringliquor ;
flames, and the onlyway to extinguish these was to take the oil cans
from their hands. He urged the women of this City to do all in their
the of submittedpower towards passage the Dunkin Actabout to be ;
their influence was most important.
Mr. Dymond. M.P.—One of the objections raised against the .Act
m^Ji.was that it was a law for the rich man and not for the poor
man could obtain his five poor n^an had toThe rich qrallons, but the
do without any. It is the poor man who ought to be gratefid to
them, for taking the temptation from him. The poor man
;*this point disturbing part ^he[At a shout arose from tne back
hall. The Chairman requested the individual to come to order he;
would not be allowed at a public meeting to conduct himself as he
The excited,did in his own bar. meeting here became somewhat
Anti-Dunkin men contending who the dis-the that the person raised
turbance was not a hotel-keeper.]
ChairmanThe announced his intention of explaining.
concludingMr. Dymond on his remarks was succeeded by
Rev. a. Sutherland.—Even if the Actwhich wastobepassedwas
somewhat arbitrary, it was well to consider that many of their most
beneficial laws were arbitrary. He would advise those who had
their sunk in the liquor trade business,money to invest it in other
from which if thej^ could not derive so great profit, they woulda yet
confer imtold blessings upon their fellow men.
onMr, Waterhouse, came the platform to combat Mr. Blake's
expressions relative to the man who had the disturbancecaused
during Mr, Dymond's speech. He said, if that individual was an
hotel-keeper as the Chairman had stated he was, he would have him
censured and degraded as an insult thaXto their calling. He held
they were honest in the business, and that it was not they who drag-
ged men into the taverns they came to whem of their own free will.
;
In Parliament some time ago, a motion for prohibition was lost on a
division, by majority of 104 that showed opinion ona ; tne popular
the matter. If it was a tavern-kf^eper as was said" caused the dis-
turbance, he would now place on the table, ten dollars for the pur-
thoughtpose of exposing him. He it would tax the people to their
utmost to compelled to raise the five or six deficiencybe millions, the
which would occur, if prohibition was passed.
At this moment, a pei*son, not a tavern-keeper, rose and stated
that it the interruptionwas he who caused complained of.
The Chairman said that nothing had himpleased more to-night,
than the spirit in which his friend had defended his Hecause.
wouldhoped that their friends continue in the same spirit, until the
battle He washad been concluded. satisfied now, the man who
disturbed the meeting was not an hotel-keeper.. ;
riii. PREFACE.
Mact.kan, President of the Ontario Prohibitory Leapnie.Mr. O.
Raid he knew that the publicans broke the rules which were directed
hours when the law prohibited itsagainst them. They sold li(iuor at
sale. known one in Toronto who had not sold liquorHe had only
after seven on Saturday Night, (ci-ies of "no, no,") thereo'clock
''mljrV „ however be more (cries of yes. yes.")
platrorm denied the statementMr. Jame.m Beer, came to the and
made adhered the law, and soldby Mr. Maclean. He for one, to no
liquor contrary to the law,
Mr. Matt Evans, also rose and sl^ifted by marked emphasis
to thethat he too was a stringent adherent law.
The good order, it being that themeeting broke up in evident
first serious movement had now ommenced, which was to bring the
opposing forces speedily into line, preparatory to the decisive charge
a the battle of the i>olls. The Licensed Victuallers now were pre-
nnring quietly meet the worst. On the waybut resolutely to home
from the meeting this evening, a little knot took the same route.
One of these asked a citizen present, what motto he would suggest
for their banner, which must now be unfurled. The reply was the
following impromptu—
*
The flag that waved a thousand years, v
O'er beer and bread and cheese.
Shall not go down before Blake's frown, .v,
Or noxious Dunkiu breeze !
That night the design was roughly sketched but as the cut;
cheese on the white ground bore a suspicious resemblance to the
for fearcrescent on the Moslem standard, the idea was abandoned
that the original prohibi-symbol might be mistaken for that of the
tionists and sons of Mahomet.of temperance—The followers
' ' - - . - J. . . ,,,'/» - f ^
7 . . I -, ... i ."'. -t^yj:
ST. LAWRENCE HALL.—July 10th.
A large gathering called by the promoters of the Dunkin Act,
several ladies were pre.sent.
Mr. E. Coatsworth, occupied thechairand invited the opponents
of the Dunkin who to seat onAct wished to speak take a the plat-
form.
Mr. p. Boyle, was the first speaker called upon, and was glad to
see how the cause had been promoted by Christian Churches. Hip
Church andwas in favour of temperance, advocated the suppresyion
of strong drink.
Mr. O'Keefe, rose correct a statement of the speaker. Heto
could tell Mr. Boyle that His Grace the Archbishop had declared,
that he himself, and his flock were dissatisfied with the Dunkin Act.
He thought from Mr.it would be inferred Boyle's assertion, that His
Grace was in favour of the Act, which was not the case.
Mr. Boyle, on resuming, said he could assure Mr. O'Keefe that
His Grace was in favour of temperance, and enjoined on young per-
sons untilto keep the temperance pledge thev were twenty-one
years of the testimony of Cardinal Manningage. He also adduced
and F&tliK v Burke. If the Act was passed, he would be willing to
allow con.pensation to those who would be heavy losers by the
change in the liquor law.
Mr. simply to refute the popular impressionO'Keefe, wished
that those who not in favour of theDunkin Act were thereforewere
in opposition to Temperance. He totally differed from this impres-
sion. He advocated the light wine and beer drinking as practised in
Germany former country, government encour-and France. In the
aged beer drinking to the suppression of more ardent spirits. The
Dunkin Act would suppress aimnkenness in Toronto, no more than
the Maine Liquor Law decreased intemperance in Maine, where
more in now, StatedMinkenness was indulged than before the was
subjected liquor law. Hewas in favour of Mr. Bine'sto its stringent
moral suasion movement, and thought it had done much good. At
St. Andrew's Hall, he was surprised to hear Mr. D.rmond make the
statement, that the great proportion of Canadian barley was made
into proportion was only per cent.whiskey, whereas the The3>
great trouble in country was poor and cneap whiskey. Hethis
would like to the encouragement of beer and light wines,see
(cheers.)PBEFACS IX
prove the DunkiiiAld. Hallam, cited some caae« to that Act
of promoting tiiiuperance and order, and eon-Yould have the effect
by Htatiag that they would know no (h'feat, and if they werelucied
lefeated at the turn around and Hubmit tne Acti)oll8,
igain.
next addressed the mettine, and in risingMr. E. Kino Dodds,
loudly cheered. He said he had not V)een invited to th« meetinspvvaa
simjily the HalLthe Temperance people, out had drojjped intoby
seat on the platfonn. At the one hundredand was asked to take a
he had deliveretl throuffhoiit the Province, he had alwayslectures
ofit a point to invite on his platforii!. the advocates the Tem-made
his fiiends, not met withperance cause, he however, and had a
treatment. He was in favour of the Rine movement, andreciprocal
acknovvledK d thegreat go«Ml it had brout^ht al)out. He himself was
to remain without uniting him-temperate man and was able onea
any temperance loflge. He advocated that law whichself to
allowed drinking by the single glass. Aid. Hallam and the other
advocates of wisiied drinking to be carried onby the five
at St. Andrew's Hall, that tavern-gallons. Mr. Blake's statement
now had thirteen years warning was absm-d, sincekeepei-s had
Dunkin's Bill had remained a dead letter. Mr. Dodfl's combatted the
to of Mr, Bovle in hisarguments and took exception the conclusions
Archbishop and Cardinal Manning, and pointed outleferences to the
l)y extracts from the Bo.ston Arqm, that the Maine l..iquor I^w had
proved a failure. Of twenty-one convictions under the Dunkin Act
seventeenhad been quasheil whenin Picton for illicit traffic in liquor,
before Supreme Court. He thought that tne raising ofbrought a
.*i7,000 additional taxes would appeal to the citizens of Toronto,
before they cast their vote at the coming contest. (Cheers.)
SpENf'E wished to contradict Mr. Dodds in several ])Oint8.Mr.
could oroduce the testimony of four ex-Mayoi-s oi Portland, whoHe
asserted that the law had workedadmirably in Maine, and that there
drinking.had been an apparent diminution of
singing the National Authem. ;%Themeeting closed by i, ;. 5
METROPOLITAN CHURCH.—July IttTH.
In Dunkin large attendance.simport of the Ac* , a
Mr. Rose in the chair. He said he would vote for the Dunkin
Act as the best measure they could now get. He would consider
any scheme from the Licensed Victuallers, looking to compensation
for their losses, if the Act passes.
Mr. Garvin had no with compensation because thesymi:)athy ;
Act w^as arbitrary, it should not be rejected. Every good Act was
most boldarbitrary. Anti-t^unkinites as every one knew, made the
and statements their meetings.untruthful at
Mr. Gurney said that after much trouble he had succeeded in
making sober iden of his boys, but taverns and grogshops sprungup
• now namearound his eyta .lishraent, and the result was he could not
one of those young menwho did not get drank. Although the neces-
sary hotels would be obliterated by the Dunkin Act, yet he was pre-
pared to see them sacrificed for the sake of having the corner
groggeries annihilated.
Dr. Wilmot.—Tile time was now come to put down the evils of
intoxicating drink to use something stronger than moral suasion.;
He beUeved with Vice-Chancellor Blake, that what was called the
Victuallers,vested interests of the Licensed should be swept away
without any compensation whatever. He was willing to buy all the
stock inhand of the whiskey sellei*s. and throw it where it should be
throw^n, into the gutter. Undeniable success had attended the Dun-
which it waskin Act in those counties in passed.
IIr. Aikins did not think there should be any compensation. It
did not require any capital for a man to set up a whiskey shop. He
showed by statistics that the Crooks Act had failed to suppress the
increase of intemperance.
Rev. Mr. Gales of the Dominion Alliance. 'meant to tell theHe
Licensed Victuallers, that they never meant to stop at the Dunkin
Act nothing would satisfy them but total prohibition.3
A meeting in the Dunkin interest was held in the church, at the
west end, comer of Spadina Avenue and College Street.