A Reader In Animation Studies
328 pages
English

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328 pages
English

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Description

Discusses animation from aesthetic, cultural, and gender studies perspectives.


Cartoons—both from the classic Hollywood era and from more contemporary feature films and television series—offer a rich field for detailed investigation and analysis. Contributors draw on theories and methodology from film, television, and media studies, art history and criticism, and feminism and gender studies.


The Society for Animation Studies: A brief history by Harvey Deneroff
Introduction by Jayne Pilling
1. What is animation and who needs to know? An essay on definitions by Philip Kelley Denslow
2. 'Reality' effects in computer animation by Lev Manovich
3. Second-order realism and post-modern aesthetics in computer animation by Andy Darley
4. The Quay brothers' The Epic of Gilgamesh and the 'metaphysics of obscenity' by Steve Weiner
5. Narrative strategies for resistance and protest in Eastern European animation by William Moritz
6. Putting themselves in the pictures: Images of women in the work of Joanna Quinn, Candy Guard and Alison de Vere by Sandra Law
7. An analysis of Susan Pitt's Asparagus and Joanna Priestley's All My Relations by Sharon Couzin
8. Clay animation comes out of the inkwell: The Fleischer brothers and clay animation by Michael Frierson
9. Bartosch's The Idea by William Moritz
10. Norman McLaren and Jules Engel: Post-Modernists by William Moritz
11. Disney, Warner Bros. and Japanese animation by Luca Raffaelli
12. The theif of Buena Vista: Disney's Aladdin and Orientalism by Leslie Felperin
13. Animatophilia, cultural production and corporate interests: The case of Ren & Stimpy by Mark Langer
14. Francis Bacon and Walt Disney revisited by Simon Pummell
15. Body consciousness in the films of Jan Svankmajer by Paul Wells
16. Eisenstein and Stokes on Disney: Film animation and omnipotence by Michael O'Pray
17. Towards a post-modern animated discourse: Bakhtin, intertextuality and the cartoon carnival by Terrance R. Lindvall and J. Matthew Melton
18. Restoring the aesthetics of early abstract films by William Moritz
19. Risistance and subversion in animated films of the Nazi era: The case of Hans Fischerkoesen by William Moritz
20. European influences on early Disney feature films by Robin Allan
21. Norm Verguson and the Latin American films of Walt Disney by J. B. Kaufmann

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 22 mai 1998
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9780861969005
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 1 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0500€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Extrait

A Reader in Animation Studies
About the book
A Reader in Animation Studies reflects a growing interest in animation as a medium that spans a far wider range of films than that of cartoons for children. Animation has emerged from its previously marginalised status both in terms of growing adult audiences for the heterogeneous range of films that come under the heading ‘animation’ and in terms of providing a corpus of work deserving serious academic analysis and study.
The serious study of popular culture has provided fertile ground for the development of sophisticated forms of critical commentary, and cartoons – both from the classic Hollywood era and from more contemporary feature films and television series – offer a rich field for detailed investigation and analysis. An even greater richness is provided by the growing Western appetite for Japanese anime . At the same time, animation has provided the stimulus for a wide range of analyses drawing from the traditions and theoretical engagements of many other disciplines, including film, television and media studies, art history and criticism, feminism and gender studies. All these fields and modes of analysis are reflected in A Reader in Animation Studies , which also engages with the long tradition of art-animation – particularly in Eastern and Western Europe – which prompt different critical responses. A Reader in Animation Studies also engages with the fascinating issues about the very definition of animation raised with the fairly recent development of the use of computer technologies.
An indispensable tool for academics, researchers and students of film, television, media, art and cultural studies as well as offering a fascinating account for the general reader of this massively popular field of media entertainment.

Biography
Jane Pilling is a freelance film programmer, sometime journalist and translator, who also writes and teaches on film and animation, currently at the Royal College of Art in London.
A Reader in Animation Studies

Edited by Jayne Pilling
Illustration on the front cover: ‘Vince in a tutu’, animation cel from Joanna Quinn’s film Body Beautiful . Still courtesy of artist and filmmaker Joanna Quinn.
© 1997 John Libbey & Company Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. Any unauthorised duplication contravenes applicable laws.
All efforts have been made by the publisher to attribute correct ownership of material. The publisher apologises for any incorrect references that appear.
National Library Cataloguing-in-Publication data:

A reader in animation studies
ISBN 1 86462 000 5 Animation (Cinematography). 2. Animated films. 3. Cartoonists. I. Pilling, Jayne.
741.58

Ebook edition ISBN: 978-0-86196-900-5

Ebook edition published by John Libbey Publishing Ltd, 3 Leicester Road, New Barnet, Herts EN5 5EW, United Kingdom e-mail: john.libbey@orange.fr ; web site: www.johnlibbey.com
Printed and electronic book orders (Worldwide): Indiana University Press , Herman B Wells Library – 350, 1320E. 10th St., Bloomington, IN 47405, USA
www.iupress.indiana.edu

© 2011 Copyright John Libbey Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.
Contents

The Society for Animation Studies: A brief history Harvey Deneroff

Introduction Jayne Pilling
New technologies 1. What is animation and who needs to know? An essay on definitions Philip Kelly Denslow 2. ‘Reality’ effects in computer animation Lev Manovich 3. Second-order realism and post-modern aesthetics in computer animation Andy Darley
Text and context: Analyses of individual films 4. The Quay brothers’ The Epic of Gilgamesh and the ‘metaphysics of obscenity’ Steve Weiner 5. Narrative strategies for resistance and protest in Eastern European animation William Moritz 6. Putting themselves in the pictures: Images of women in the work of Joanna Quinn, Candy Guard and Alison de Vere Sandra Law 7. An analysis of Susan Pitt’s Asparagus and Joanna Priestley’s All My Relations Sharon Couzin 8. Clay animation comes out of the inkwell: The Fleischer brothers and clay animation Michael Frierson 9. Bartosch’s The Idea William Moritz 10. Norman McLaren and Jules Engel: Post-modernists William Moritz 11. Disney, Warner Bros. and Japanese animation Luca Raffaelli
Contemporary cartoons and cultural studies 12. The thief of Buena Vista: Disney’s Aladdin and Orientalism Leslie Felperin 13. Animatophilia, cultural production and corporate interests: The case of Ren & Stimpy Mark Langer
Theoretical approaches 14. Francis Bacon and Walt Disney revisited Simon Pummell 15. Body consciousness in the films of Jan Svankmajer Paul Wells 16. Eisenstein and Stokes on Disney: Film animation and omnipotence Michael O’ Pray 17. Towards a post-modern animated discourse: Bakhtin, intertextuality and the cartoon carnival Terrance R. Lindvall and J. Matthew Melton
(Rewriting) history 18. Restoring the aesthetics of early abstract films William Moritz 19. Resistance and subversion in animated films of the Nazi era: The case of Hans Fischerkoesen William Moritz 20. European influences on early Disney feature films Robin Allan 21. Norm Ferguson and the Latin American films of Walt Disney J.B. Kaufman
Notes on the contributors

List of SAS Conference papers – 1989 to 1996
The Society for Animation Studies: A brief history

by Harvey Deneroff, Editor & Publisher , The Animation Report, Canoga Park, California, the United States

W hile I began the Society for Animation Studies (SAS) in Los Angeles in late 1987, I was an unemployed PhD and an adult child of an animator who had been harbouring a long-held frustration with the way the cinema studies establishment seemed to ignore animation. With no funds and lacking an academic affiliation, I nevertheless garnered immediate support from local universities and organisations, as well as a small cadre of academics, independent scholars and filmmakers who gladly agreed to serve on the SAS Steering Committee.

Armed with a grant from the Motion Picture Screen Cartoonists, IATSE Local 839 (it helped that I was their unofficial historian), a mailing was sent out, and memberships started coming in from the United States and Canada, as well as from Europe, Australia and New Zealand. The UCLA Animation Workshop (along with the UCLA Film & Television Archive) and Carleton University (with the Ottawa Animation Festival) put in bids to host the first SAS Conference, which took place in 1989 at UCLA. (Carleton hosted the 1990 conference.)

SAS, through its annual conferences and newsletter, has not only provided a focus for animation studies, but has led to papers and articles on animation appearing more regularly at academic conferences and scholarly journals. It also led to Animation Journal , the first juried publication in the field (founded by SAS member Maureen Furniss).

My current involvement with SAS has been rather minimal, preferring to allow my successors as president (William Moritz and Richard J. Leskosky) to ably manage the organisations on behalf of its members. Instead, I take pleasure in mining the friendships and knowledge acquired through my association with the Society in both my personal and professional life.
Introduction

Jayne Pilling

O ver the past decade, animation seems finally to have emerged from its previously very marginalised status, both in terms of a growing adult audience for the very heterogenous range of films that come under the rubric ‘animation’ and in terms of academic study.
This explosion of interest reflects a growing recognition of animation as a medium that spans a far wider range of films than that of cartoons only for children.
The creation of a Society for Animation Studies (SAS) in 1988 is an indication of this changing attitude, and also a significant contributor to it. This book comprises a selection of papers presented at annual SAS conferences. However, ‘animation studies’ is still hardly established as an academic discipline. Consequently, a ‘reader’ might be considered a rather pre-emptive gesture in this instance and the conventional introduction to an academic reader (which usually seeks to place its contents in context through the critical and theoretical traditions in previous writings on the subject, and establishes a position or dialectic in relation to the latter), might seem inappropriate.
Nonetheless, ‘Where can I find critical writing about animation?’ and ‘Why has there been so little written on the subject?’ are recurrent questions from students and sometimes teachers on the multitude of courses that have begun to address animation, whether as a component of film, media and popular culture studies, or those that are production-oriented with a critical studies element. It seems more useful, then, to use this introduction to look briefly at some of the reasons for animation’s marginalisation, why this has changed in recent years, how this reflects in writing on the subject, and to touch on issues and problems raised in defining the area of animation studies itself.
Animation’s rise in popularity
Several factors have contributed to the growing popularity of animation with adult audiences. The success of feature films such as Who Killed Roger Rabbit? , The Nightmare Before Christmas , the Wallace & Gromit 1 films or, in ‘art-house’ distribution, the films of Jan Svankmajer 2 and the Brothers Quay 3 are obvious examples of animation that have changed viewers’ perceptions o

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