Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls: 100 Immigrant Women Who Changed the World
319 pages
English

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319 pages
English

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Description

ONE OF OPRAH'S FAVORITE THINGS 2021!

A 2021 NATIONAL PARENTING PRODUCT AWARDS WINNER!

As Oprah says on Oprah Daily, "Reading can inspire you to do great things—what a great gift for a preteen! This series features boundary-breaking women and includes stories about some who have moved me the most—like Toni Morrison. They even included me!"

The latest installment in the New York Times bestselling Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls series, featuring 100 immigrant women who have shaped, and will continue to shape, our world.

Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls: 100 Immigrant Women Who Changed the World is the third book in the New York Times bestselling series for children. Packed with 100 all-new bedtime stories about the lives of incredible female figures from the past and the present, this volume recognizes women who left their birth countries for a multitude of reasons: some for new opportunities, some out of necessity.

Readers will whip up a plate with Asma Khan, strategize global affairs alongside Madeleine Albright, venture into business with Rihanna, and many more. All of these unique, yet relatable stories are accompanied by gorgeous, full-page, full-color portraits, illustrated by female artists from all over the globe.


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Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 13 octobre 2020
Nombre de lectures 3
EAN13 9781734264173
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 6 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0750€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Extrait

CONTENTS

ADELAIDE HERRMANN • MAGICIAN
ALICE GUY-BLACHÉ • FILMMAKER
ANGELICA ROZEANU • TABLE TENNIS PLAYER
ANITA SARKEESIAN • JOURNALIST AND MEDIA CRITIC
ANNA WINTOUR • EDITOR IN CHIEF
ANNE HIDALGO • POLITICIAN
ANNE WAFULA STRIKE • PARALYMPIAN
ANNIKA SÖRENSTAM • GOLFER
ARIANNA HUFFINGTON • AUTHOR AND CEO
ASMA KHAN • CHEF
BANA ALABED • ACTIVIST
CARMEN HERRERA • ARTIST
CARMEN MIRANDA • SINGER AND ACTRESS
CAROLINA GUERRERO • JOURNALIST AND PRODUCER
CHINWE ESIMAI • FINANCIAL EXECUTIVE
CLARA JULIANA GUERRERO LONDOÑO • BOWLER
CLARA LEMLICH SHAVELSON • ACTIVIST
CLAUDIA RANKINE • POET AND PLAYWRIGHT
DANIELA SCHILLER • NEUROSCIENTIST
DANIELA SOTO-INNES • CHEF
DAPHNE KOLLER • COMPUTER SCIENTIST AND ENTREPRENEUR
DIANE VON FÜRSTENBERG • FASHION DESIGNER
DOREEN SIMMONS • SPORTS COMMENTATOR
EDMONIA LEWIS • SCULPTOR
EILEEN GRAY • ARCHITECT AND FURNITURE DESIGNER
ELENA PONIATOWSKA • JOURNALIST
ELISA ROJAS • LAWYER
ELISABETH KÜBLER-ROSS • PSYCHIATRIST
ELIZABETH NYAMAYARO • POLITICAL SCIENTIST
EMILIE SNETHLAGE • ORNITHOLOGIST
EMMY NOETHER • MATHEMATICIAN
FATMA IPEK ALCI • ACTIVIST
FRIEDA BELINFANTE • CELLIST AND CONDUCTOR
GERALDINE COX • HUMANITARIAN
GERALDINE HEANEY • ICE HOCKEY PLAYER AND COACH
GERDA TARO • PHOTOGRAPHER
GLORIA ESTEFAN • SINGER
GOLDA MEIR • POLITICIAN
HANNAH ARENDT • PHILOSOPHER AND POLITICAL THEORIST
HAZEL SCOTT • MUSICIAN AND ACTIVIST
ILHAN OMAR • POLITICIAN
INDRA DEVI • YOGI
JAWAHIR JEWELS ROBLE • REFEREE
JOSEPHINE BAKER • ENTERTAINER AND ACTIVIST
JUDY CASSAB • PAINTER
JULIETA LANTERI • PHYSICIAN AND POLITICIAN
KAREN CORR • BILLIARDS PLAYER
KAREN HORNEY • PSYCHOANALYST
KARIN SCHMIDT • MUSHER AND VETERINARIAN
KEIKO FUKUDA • JUDOKA
LASKARINA “BOUBOULINA” PINOTSIS • NAVAL COMMANDER
LINA BO BARDI • ARCHITECT
LISA STHALEKAR • CRICKET CHAMPION AND COMMENTATOR
LIZ CLAIBORNE • FASHION DESIGNER AND CEO
LORELLA PRAELI • ACTIVIST
LUPE GONZALO • MIGRANT FARMER AND LABOR ORGANIZER
LUPITA AMONDI NYONG’O • ACTRESS
MADELEINE ALBRIGHT • POLITICIAN
MALIKA OUFKIR • AUTHOR
MARCELA CONTRERAS • HEMATOLOGIST
MARIA GOEPPERT MAYER • THEORETICAL PHYSICIST
MARJANE SATRAPI • GRAPHIC NOVELIST
MARTA EMPINOTTI • BASE JUMPER
MERLENE JOYCE OTTEY • SPRINTER
MIN JIN LEE • AUTHOR
MIN MEHTA • ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON
MUZOON ALMELLEHAN • ACTIVIST
NADINE BURKE HARRIS • PEDIATRICIAN
NAMI AND REN HAYAKAWA • ARCHERS
NIKI YANG • ANIMATOR AND VOICE ACTOR
NOOR INAYAT KHAN • SPY
OLGA KORBUT • GYMNAST
PAULA NEWBY-FRASER • TRIATHLETE
PEARL TRAN AND THU GETKA • DENTISTS
PNINA TAMANO-SHATA • LAWYER AND LAWMAKER
RAPELANG RABANA • COMPUTER SCIENTIST AND ENTREPRENEUR
REYNA DUONG • CHEF
RIHANNA • ENTREPRENEUR AND SINGER
ROJA MAYA LIMBU AND SUJANA RANA • UNION ORGANIZERS
ROSALIE ABELLA • JUDGE
ROSE FORTUNE • ENTREPRENEUR AND POLICE OFFICER
ROSELI OCAMPO-FRIEDMANN • MICROBIOLOGIST
SAMANTHA POWER • DIPLOMAT
SANDRA CAUFFMAN • ELECTRICAL ENGINEER
SARA MAZROUEI • PLANETARY GEOLOGIST
SARA MCLAGAN • NEWSPAPER EDITOR
SAU LAN WU • PHYSICIST
SURYA BONALY • FIGURE SKATER
SUSAN FRANCIA • ROWER
SUSAN POLGAR • CHESS CHAMPION
TEREZA LEE • ACTIVIST
TIMNIT GEBRU • COMPUTER SCIENTIST
TURIA PITT • ATHLETE AND AUTHOR
VELMA SCANTLEBURY • TRANSPLANT SURGEON
XIYE BASTIDA PATRICK • ACTIVIST
YOKY MATSUOKA • ROBOTICS ENGINEER
YOSHIKO CHUMA • CHOREOGRAPHER AND PERFORMANCE ARTIST
YOUNG JEAN LEE • PLAYWRIGHT
YUAN YUAN TAN • BALLERINA
ZAINAB SALBI • ACTIVIST
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
GLOSSARY
ILLUSTRATORS
To the rebel girls of the world:
Cross boundaries
Demand freedom
Make your mark
And, when in doubt, remember
The future is yours.
PREFACE

Dear Rebels,
To those of you who are picking up a Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls book for the first time, I want to say, “Welcome!” And to those of you who are joining us for the second or even third time, “Welcome back!” In this book, I am excited to share with you one hundred stories of incredible women who moved from one country to another, experiencing some form of immigration over the course of their lives.
This is also a personal topic for me, as I am an immigrant myself. Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls was created by two women—me (Elena Favilli) and Francesca Cavallo—who moved from Italy to the United States and who wanted to share their vision for a more equal world with all of you. I came to the US when I was twenty-three years old to attend University of California, Berkeley. This country is now my home, where I have built this company, written these books, and met all of you. As you can see, Francesca is not writing this third book with me, but that same inspiration we shared at the start of our journey continues to drive this series.
People often ask me what it means to be a Rebel Girl, and there can be many definitions—just like we are all different from one another. At her heart, a Rebel Girl is someone who tries to make the world better for herself and the people around her, no matter the risks. In the following pages, you will read stories about women who embody the spirit of the Rebel Girl, leaving their birth countries for a multitude of reasons. Some of these women actively chose to seek new opportunities, while others left out of necessity.
You will explore the Amazon with Emilie Snethlage, part scientist, part explorer, who moved from Germany to study the plants and animals of the Brazilian rainforest. You will dance with Yuan Yuan Tan whose career as a ballerina began with the flip of a coin and brought her from China to her new home in the United States. And you will fight for what’s right with Muzoon Almellehan, who fled war in Syria to settle in England, finding strength in books, campaigning for girls’ education, and becoming one of the youngest UNICEF Goodwill Ambassadors to date.
Immigration is rarely thought of as a woman’s story, but more than half of all immigrants are women. The women featured in this book have already made an impact on the world just by forging their own paths across borders. They also happened to accomplish great things in their new homes. But whatever an immigrant hopes to achieve through their journey, I hope you will finish this book with an understanding that movement from one country to another is a human right.
As you dive into each of these stories, it might help to think about times you’ve wanted to move from one place to another. Have you ever wanted to move to a different classroom? A different team? What about a different city? That is exactly what these immigrant women did, on a larger scale. Let their courage and perseverance be a reminder to you, Rebel Girls, that you should always fight for your beliefs no matter where they take you.
Yours,
Elena Favilli
ADELAIDE HERRMANN
MAGICIAN

O nce upon a time, there was a girl with a flair for the dramatic. While other Victorian girls learned housekeeping skills, Adelaide practiced acrobatics, dance, and a new sport called trick cycling.
One night, Adelaide saw a magic show in London that changed her life. The magician, Alexander Herrmann (known as Herrmann the Great), asked for a volunteer, and Adelaide eagerly raised her hand. The magician set her ring on fire and made it reappear on a ribbon tied around a dove’s neck!
A few months later, when Adelaide moved to New York City, she ran into Alexander again. They got married and together became one of the country’s most successful magic acts. Herrmann the Great was the star, and Adelaide played supporting roles, including a dancer and a human cannonball!
In 1896, Alexander suddenly died. Adelaide was left alone with their magic show, a warehouse of props and animals, and a mountain of debt. But soon it became clear that only one person had the experience to continue Herrmann the Great’s legacy —Adelaide herself.
For more than thirty years, Adelaide performed as the Queen of Magic. After a fire tore through her warehouse, Adelaide insisted she’d rise like a phoenix from the ashes. And she did. She continued to tour before finally retiring in her seventies.
AUGUST 11, 1853–FEBRUARY 19, 1932
ENGLAND → UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
“SELF-CONFIDENCE AND ASSURANCE ARE MOST ESSENTIAL TO THE SUCCESSFUL MAGICIAN.”
—ADELAIDE HERRMANN
ILLUSTRATION BY CAMILLE DE CUSSAC
ALICE GUY-BLACHÉ
FILMMAKER

O nce there was a girl named Alice who spent her childhood crisscrossing the globe from France (her mother’s home) to Chile (her father’s home) to Switzerland (where she lived with her grandmother). When she grew up, Alice became a secretary at a camera company turned film studio. Filmmaking was a new and exciting art form. The very first films were nothing like today’s movies. They showed people doing ordinary things—a group of workers simply leaving a factory or a train racing along a track.
Alice thought these films were boring and wondered: What if film could be used to tell a story? So she borrowed camera equipment and created her first motion picture, The Cabbage Fairy . It was only about one minute long, but it was one of the first films to tell a fictional story.
Eventually, Alice became the studio’s head of production and experimented with new ways to make films and add special effects. She married a fellow filmmaker, Herbert Blaché, and they moved to the United States. In 1910, Alice opened her own film studio called the Solax Film Company and eventually built a state-of-the-art production studio. It was the largest film studio in the country.
Herbert became the company’s president so Alice could be free to make movies. She became the world’s first woman filmmaker, creating around a thousand films—many of which survive today. Alice made her last film in 1920 and was forgotten for a long time, but today’s filmmakers owe a lot to this pioneering director and producer.
JULY 1, 1873–MARCH 24, 1968
FRANCE → UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
“THERE IS NOTHING CONNECTED WI

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