Fly-Fishing and Worm Fishing for Salmon, Trout and Grayling
51 pages
English

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51 pages
English

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Description

Fly fishing is a method of angling whereby an artificial "fly" is used to catch fish, while worm fishing refers to fishing using a live worm as bait. This vintage volume contains a beginner-friendly guide to both styles of fishing, concentrating on the catching of salmonidae including salmon, trout, and grayling. Contents include: “General Observations”, “The System of Artificial Flies”, “Brown Trout”, “Artificial Fly-fishing in Rivers and Lakes”, “River Fly-fishing”, “How to Fish”, “Casting”, “Working the Dropper”, “Trout Drop-flies”, “Knot for Fastening Reel Lines to Casting Lines”, “Striking and Playing”, “When to Fish”, “Where to Fish”, etc. Many vintage books such as this are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this volume now in a modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially commissioned new introduction on the history of fishing.

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Publié par
Date de parution 16 octobre 2020
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9781528768399
Langue English

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0017€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Exrait

FLY-FISHING
AND
WORM-FISHING
FOR
SALMON, TROUT AND GRAYLING
BY
H. CHOLMONDELEY-PENNELL
LATE H.M. INSPECTOR OF FISHERIES
Copyright 2018 Read Books Ltd.
This book is copyright and may not be reproduced or copied in any way without the express permission of the publisher in writing
British Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data
A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library
A Short History of Fishing
Fishing, in its broadest sense - is the activity of catching fish. It is an ancient practice dating back at least 40,000 years. Since the sixteenth century fishing vessels have been able to cross oceans in pursuit of fish and since the nineteenth century it has been possible to use larger vessels and in some cases process the fish on board. Techniques for catching fish include varied methods such as hand gathering, spearing, netting, angling and trapping.
Isotopic analysis of the skeletal remains of Tianyuan man, a 40,000 year old modern human from eastern Asia, has shown that he regularly consumed freshwater fish. As well as this, archaeological features such as shell middens, discarded fish-bones and cave paintings show that sea foods were important for early man s survival and were consumed in significant quantities. The first civilisation to practice organised fishing was the Egyptians however, as the River Nile was so full of fish. The Egyptians invented various implements and methods for fishing and these are clearly illustrated in tomb scenes, drawings and papyrus documents. Simple reed boats served for fishing. Woven nets, weir baskets made from willow branches, harpoons and hook and line (the hooks having a length of between eight millimetres and eighteen centimetres) were all being used. By the twelfth dynasty, metal hooks with barbs were also utilised.
Despite the Egyptian s strong history of fishing, later Greek cultures rarely depicted the trade, due to its perceived low social status. There is a wine cup however, dating from c.500 BC, that shows a boy crouched on a rock with a fishing-rod in his right hand and a basket in his left. In the water below there is a rounded object of the same material with an opening on the top. This has been identified as a fish-cage used for keeping live fish, or as a fish-trap. One of the other major Grecian sources on fishing is Oppian of Corycus, who wrote a major treatise on sea fishing, the Halieutica or Halieutika , composed between 177 and 180. This is the earliest such work to have survived intact to the modern day. Oppian describes various means of fishing including the use of nets cast from boats, scoop nets held open by a hoop, spears and tridents, and various traps which work while their masters sleep. Oppian s description of fishing with a motionless net is also very interesting:
The fishers set up very light nets of buoyant flax and wheel in a circle round about while they violently strike the surface of the sea with their oars and make a din with sweeping blow of poles. At the flashing of the swift oars and the noise the fish bound in terror and rush into the bosom of the net which stands at rest, thinking it to be a shelter: foolish fishes which, frightened by a noise, enter the gates of doom. Then the fishers on either side hasten with the ropes to draw the net ashore . . .
The earliest English essay on recreational fishing was published in 1496, shortly after the invention of the printing press! Unusually for the time, its author was a woman; Dame Juliana Berners, the prioress of the Benedictine Sopwell Nunnery (Hertforshire). The essay was titled Treatyse of Fysshynge with an Angle and was published in a larger book, forming part of a treatise on hawking, hunting and heraldry. These were major interests of the nobility, and the publisher, Wynkyn der Worde was concerned that the book should be kept from those who were not gentlemen, since their immoderation in angling might utterly destroye it. The roots of recreational fishing itself go much further back however, and the earliest evidence of the fishing reel comes from a fourth century AD work entitled Lives of Famous Mortals.
Many credit the first recorded use of an artificial fly (fly fishing) to an even earlier source - to the Roman Claudius Aelianus near the end of the second century. He described the practice of Macedonian anglers on the Astraeus River, . . . they have planned a snare for the fish, and get the better of them by their fisherman s craft. . . . They fasten red wool round a hook, and fit on to the wool two feathers which grow under a cock s wattles, and which in colour are like wax. Recreational fishing for sport or leisure only really took off during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries though, and coincides with the publication of Izaak Walton s The Compleat Angler in 1653. This is seen as the definitive work that champions the position of the angler who loves fishing for the sake of fishing itself. More than 300 editions have since been published, demonstrating its unstoppable popularity.
Big-game fishing only started as a sport after the invention of the motorised boat. In 1898, Dr. Charles Frederick Holder, a marine biologist and early conservationist, virtually invented this sport and went on to publish many articles and books on the subject. His works were especially noted for their combination of accurate scientific detail with exciting narratives. Big-game fishing is also a recreational pastime, though requires a largely purpose built boat for the hunting of large fish such as the billfish (swordfish, marlin and sailfish), larger tunas (bluefin, yellowfin and bigeye), and sharks (mako, great white, tiger and hammerhead). Such developments have only really gained prominence in the twentieth century. The motorised boat has also meant that commercial fishing, as well as fish farming has emerged on a massive scale. Large trawling ships are common and one of the strongest markets in the world is the cod trade which fishes roughly 23,000 tons from the Northwest Atlantic, 475,000 tons from the Northeast Atlantic and 260,000 tons from the Pacific.
These truly staggering amounts show just how much fishing has changed; from its early hunter-gatherer beginnings, to a small and specialised trade in Egyptian and Grecian societies, to a gentleman s pastime in fifteenth century England right up to the present day. We hope that the reader enjoys this book, and is inspired by fishing s long and intriguing past to find out more about this truly fascinating subject. Enjoy.
THE COMMON TROUT (Salmo fario)
CONTENTS.


G ENERAL O BSERVATIONS
THE SYSTEM OF ARTIFICIAL FLIES
B ROWN T ROUT
ARTIFICIAL FLY-FISHING IN RIVERS AND LAKES
RIVER FLY-FISHING
HOW TO FISH
CASTING
WORKING THE DROPPER
TROUT DROP-FLIES
KNOT FOR FASTENING REEL LINES TO CASTING LINES, C.
STRIKING AND PLAYING
WHEN TO FISH
WHERE TO FISH
T ROUT F LIES
DRESSING OF TYPICAL FLIES
SELECTION OF FLIES
FLY-RODS, LINES, HOOKS, C.
REEL LINES FOR FLY-FISHING
GUT LINES
STAINING GUT
FISHING WITH THE DRY-FLY
LAKE FLY-FISHING
SELECTION OF FLIES
FISHING WITH NATURAL FLIES
BLOW-LINE FISHING WITH THE MAY-FLY
W ORM -F ISHING FOR T ROUT
NEW WORM TACKLE FOR TROUT
W HITE T ROUT F ISHING
G RAYLING F ISHING
GENERAL REMARKS
FLY-FISHING
GRASSHOPPER-FISHING
GENTLE-FISHING
S ALMON F ISHING
OUTLINE OF SALMON HISTORY AND NOMENCLATURE
NAMES OF SALMON IN DIFFERENT CONDITIONS AND STAGES OF GROWTH
FLY-FISHING
WADING
SALMON AND GRILSE FLIES
NEW KNOTS FOR GUT LOOPS AND DROP FLIES
THE ROD
THE REEL AND LINE
THE GAFF
HOOKS
WORM-FISHING FOR SALMON
NOTE.


I T will be seen from the following pages, that in regard to the theory and practice of Artificial fly-making and fishing the Author has arrived at conclusions very different to those usually accepted by anglers and angling writers; but fishermen who, in spite of preconceived views and the venerable sanction of the fathers of the gentle craft, have the courage and patience to test for themselves the results of these conclusions fairly and thoroughly, and to adopt them if they are satisfied of their soundness, will find their reward in the increased weight of their baskets, and the diminution of trouble and expense.
On this point a reviewer in Baily s Monthly Magazine observes:-
The result of Mr. Pennell s teaching is the substitution of six typical flies-three for salmon and grilse, and three for trout, grayling, c.-for the whole of the artificial flies now used. This is indeed a revolutionary measure, and one in which every fly-fisher is directly and personally interested; for who would not be glad to dispense if he could, once and for all, with the cumbrous assortment of furs, silks, and feathers with which the orthodox practice now loads his tackle-box, and the thousand-and-one patterns of flies enjoined by tackle-makers and angling writers as necessary for each variety of fish, river, and season? To the disciples of Mr. Pennel s school this will be all changed. His three typical trout-flies, which are new both in principle and construction, can be made, he assures us, by the merest tyro; and both these and the salmon-flies-dressed, of course, of different sizes-will readily stow away, with the materials for making them, in the compass of an ordinary bait-box. The glorious uncertainty as to which is the right fly, and the loss of precious time in experimental changes, are also obviated under Mr. Pennell s system, which we look forward with great interest to testing by the river-side on the first opportunity. The prospect seems almost too tempting to be realized; but it cannot be denied that the author s theories and conclusions are the legitimate deductions from an argument logically and even severely worked out; and we can hardly conceive that Mr. Pennell, whose fame is on many waters, would peril his reputation by putting forward in so deliberate a manner theories which he had not himself thoroughly tested in practice.
FLY-FISHING.


GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.
THE SYSTEM OF ARTIFICIAL FLIES.
E NGLISHMEN are as a race decidedly conservative in their habits, and very slow to move out of the beaten track-phlegmatic is the term used by their continental critics-and I shall be sorry if anything I am about to write should give offence to this in many respects excellent instinct. Conservatism, however, in the largest sense of the term implies contentment with what is; and if that were my condition in regard to the theory and practice of Angling, and especially of fly-fishing, this book would certainly not have been written. The measures which I am about to submit to the general parliament of anglers are decidedly radical-revolutionary would not be too strong a term,-for they aim at revolutionizing the fundamental principles of the fly-fisher s constitution -the very alpha and omega of his craft-I mean the system of artificial flies.
Trout fly-fishers may nowadays be divided roughly into two parties, which may be described as the colourists, or those who think colour everything and form nothing; and the formalists, or entomologists as theyhave been sometimes termed, who hold, with the late Mr. Ronalds, that the natural flies actually on the water at any given time should be exactly imitated by the artificial fly used, down to the most minute particulars of form and tinting. The latter class includes probably the very great majority of anglers-both apostles and disciples-who have in most cases imbibed their opinions almost unconsciously and without ever questioning their soundness. The colourists are still but a section, though an increasing one, of the general fly-fishing community, and are represented by a few enterprising spirits in advance not only of their age, but also, as I believe, of the truth. The theories of both I hold to be distinctly unsound; and if my reader will follow me in the next few pages, calling to mind also his own fly-fishing experiences, I have little doubt that he will arrive at a similar conclusion. In fact, the arguments of the two schools are mutually destructive.
The position of the formalists is as follows:-
Trout, they say, take artificial flies only because they in some sort resemble the natural flies which they are in the habit of seeing; if this be not so, and if colour is the only point of importance, why does not the colourist fish with a bunch of feathers tied on the hook promiscuously? why adhere to the form of the natural fly at all? Evidently because it is found, as a matter of fact, that such a bunch of feathers will not kill; in other words, because the fish do take the artificial for the natural insect. If this be so, it follows that the more minutely the artificial imitates the natural fly, the better it will kill; and also, by a legitimate deduction, that the imitation of the fly on the water at any given time is that which the fish will take best.
To the above argument the colourists reply:-
Your theory supposes that Trout can detect the nicest shades of distinction between species of flies which in a summer s afternoon may be numbered actually by hundreds, thus crediting them with an amount of entomological knowledge which even a professed naturalist, to say nothing of the angler himself, very rarely possesses; whilst at the same time you draw your flies up and across stream in a way in which no natural insect is ever seen, not only adding to the impossibility of discriminating between different species, but often rendering it difficult for the fish even to identify the flies as flies. The only thing a fish can distinguish under these circumstances, besides the size of a fly, is its colour. We therefore regard form as a matter of comparative indifference, and colour as all-important.
Now in each of the above arguments there is a part that is sound and a part that is fallacious; and it is from the failure in distinguishing the true from the false, that what I believe to be the erroneous practice of both these opposite parties springs. Each argument, however, is sound so far as to be an unanswerable answer to the other: for it is clear-as stated by the formalists -that colour is not everything in a fly, because if it were, a bunch of coloured feathers tied on anyhow to the hook would kill as well as an artificial fly, whereas by their practice the colourists themselves admit that such is not the case; on the other hand, the argument of the colourists, that from the way the artificial fly is presented to the fish it is impossible they can distinguish minuti of form and imitation, equally commends itself to common sense and common experience. This is the point, in fact, in which the entomological theory entirely breaks down. Because Trout take the artificial for the natural fly, the formalists argue that the one should be an exact counterpart of the other, ignoring the fact that the two insects are offered to the fish under entirely different conditions. The artificial fly is presented under water instead of on the surface; wet instead of dry; and in brisk motion up, down, or across stream, instead of passively floating. No doubt if the flies could always be kept dry and passively floating-that is, as they are seen in nature-the exact imitation theory would (though only up to a certain point) be sound enough; but as in practice this is impossible, we are perforce driven to artificial expedients to extricate us from the unnatural dilemma. Thus at the very outset we find ourselves compelled to simulate life instead of death in our flies; and for this purpose impart to them a wholly unnatural motion whilst swimming: again, because fluffy materials when wetted lose much of their strength of colour, fly bodies are constantly made of hard silk instead of soft dubbings; and as it is found that a naturally proportioned insect is deficient in movement, an unnatural quantity of legs (hackles) are added to it-in the smaller species the wings being often omitted entirely. In short, we are launched upon

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