Berlitz Pocket Guide Guernsey (Travel Guide eBook)
113 pages
English

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Berlitz Pocket Guide Guernsey (Travel Guide eBook)

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113 pages
English

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Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus

Description

Berlitz Pocket Guides: iconic style, a bestselling brand, this is the quintessential pocket-sized travel guide to Guernsey
Plan your trip, plan perfect days and discover how to get around - this pocket-sized guide is a convenient, quick-reference companion to discovering what to do and see in Guernsey, from top attractions like Shell Beach, Fort Grey, Hauteville House and the car-free island of Sark to hidden gems, including La Vallette Bathing Pools, the Victorian Shop and Parlour and the historic Alderney Railway. This will save you time, and enhance your exploration of this fascinating island.
- Compact, concise, and packed with essential information, this is an iconic on-the-move companion when you're exploring Guernsey
- Covers Top Ten Attractions, including Castle Cornet, Sausmarez Manor and the German Occupation Museum, and Perfect Day itinerary suggestions
- Includes an insightful overview of landscape, history and culture
Handy colour maps on the inside cover flaps will help you find your way around
- Essential practical information on everything from Eating Out to Getting Around
- Inspirational colour photography throughout
Sharp design and colour-coded sections make for an engaging reading experience
About Berlitz: Berlitz draws on years of travel and language expertise to bring you a wide range of travel and language products, including travel guides, maps, phrase books, language-learning courses, dictionaries and kids' language products.

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 01 novembre 2018
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9781785731662
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 2 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0017€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Exrait

How To Use This E-Book

Getting Around the e-Book
This Pocket Guide e-book is designed to give you inspiration and planning advice for your visit to Guernsey, and is also the perfect on-the-ground companion for your trip.
The guide begins with our selection of Top 10 Attractions, plus a Perfect Itinerary feature to help you plan unmissable experiences. The Introduction and History chapters paint a vivid cultural portrait of Guernsey, and the Where to Go chapter gives a complete guide to all the sights worth visiting. You will find ideas for activities in the What to Do section, while the Eating Out chapter describes the local cuisine and gives listings of the best restaurants. The Travel Tips offer practical information to help you plan your trip. Finally, there are carefully selected hotel listings.
In the Table of Contents and throughout this e-book you will see hyperlinked references. Just tap a hyperlink once to skip to the section you would like to read. Practical information and listings are also hyperlinked, so as long as you have an external connection to the internet, you can tap a link to go directly to the website for more information.
Maps
All key attractions and sights in Guernsey are numbered and cross-referenced to high-quality maps. Wherever you see the reference [map], tap once to go straight to the related map. You can also double-tap any map for a zoom view.
Images
You’ll find lots of beautiful high-resolution images that capture the essence of Guernsey. Simply double-tap an image to see it in full-screen.
About Berlitz Pocket Guides
The Berlitz story began in 1877 when Maximilian Berlitz devised his revolutionary method of language learning. More than 130 years later, Berlitz is a household name, famed not only for language schools but also as a provider of best-selling language and travel guides.
Our wide-ranging travel products – printed travel guides and phrase books, as well as apps and ebooks – offer all the information you need for a perfect trip, and are regularly updated by our team of expert local authors. Their practical emphasis means they are perfect for use on the ground. Wherever you’re going – whether it’s on a short break, the trip of a lifetime, a cruise or a business trip – we offer the ideal guide for your needs.
Our Berlitz Pocket Guides are the perfect choice if you need reliable, concise information in a handy format. We provide amazing value for money – these guides may be small, but they are packed with information. No wonder they have sold more than 45 million copies worldwide.
© 2018 Apa Digital (CH) AG and Apa Publications (UK) Ltd





Table of Contents
Guernsey’s Top 10 Attractions
Top Attraction #1
Top Attraction #2
Top Attraction #3
Top Attraction #4
Top Attraction #5
Top Attraction #6
Top Attraction #7
Top Attraction #8
Top Attraction #9
Top Attraction #10
A Perfect Day In Guernsey
Introduction
Location and Climate
‘Peculiar of the Crown’
Language
Economy
A Brief History
Early History
Romans and Christians
The British Connection
Navigation and Knitting
The Victorian Era
The German Occupation
Post War
Historical Landmarks
Where To Go
St Peter Port
The Waterfront
Along the Waterfront
Castle Cornet
La Valette Underground Military Museum
The Aquarium
The Heart of Town
Candie Gardens and Guernsey Museum
Guernsey Tapestry
Victorian Shop and Parlour
Victor Hugo’s House
Southern Guernsey
Sausmarez Manor
Manor Gardens
Fermain Bay
Jerbourg Point
Moulin Huet Bay
La Gran’mère de Chimquière
German Underground Military Hospital
The Little Chapel
Petit Bôt Bay
German Occupation Museum
Pleinmont Headland
The West Coast
Rocquaine Bay
Fort Grey
L’Erée Headland
Lihou Island
Perelle Bay
St Apolline’s Chapel
Vazon Bay
Fort Hommet
Cobo Bay
Saumarez Park
Folk and Costume Museum
Northern Guernsey
Around Le Grand Havre
Oatlands Village/Guernsey Freesia Centre
L’Ancresse Common
Pembroke and L’Ancresse Bays
Northeast Coast
Bordeaux Harbour
St Sampson
Herm
Herm Harbour
Herm Common
Shell Beach and Belvoir Bay
Southern Cliffs
Le Manoir
St Tugual
Sark
Ferries to Sark
Brecqhou and the Barclay Brothers
Arrival in Sark
Getting Around
Big Sark
La Seigneurie Gardens
Around the Island
Port du Moulin and Lighthouse
La Coupée
Little Sark
Alderney
St Anne
Alderney Society Museum
Braye Harbour
Alderney Railway
The Northeast
Saye and Corblets Bays
Mannez Quarry and Lighthouse
Around Longis Bay
South of the Island
What To Do
Sports and Outdoor Pursuits
Surfing and Windsurfing
Scuba Diving
Sailing
Adventure Sports
Swimming
Fishing
Walking
Birdwatching
Cycling
Golf
Horse Riding
Shopping
St Peter Port
Around the Island
Entertainment
Activities for Children
Calendar of Events
Eating Out
Seafood
Local Produce
Cider and Ale
Where to Eat
Culinary Events
Restaurants
St Peter Port
Around the Island
Fermain Bay
Jerbourg
St Martin’s
Forest
St Saviour
Torteval
L’Erée
Cobo Bay
Castel
Vale
Herm
Sark
Alderney
A–Z Travel Tips
A
Accommodation
Airports
B
Bicycle Rental
Budgeting for Your Trip
C
Camping
Car Hire
Climate
Clothing
Crime and Safety
D
Driving
E
Electricity
Embassies and High Commissions
Emergencies
G
Gay and Lesbian Travellers
Getting There
Guides and Tours
H
Health and Medical Care
L
Language
M
Maps
Media
Money
O
Opening Hours
P
Police
Post Offices
Public Holidays
T
Telephones
Time Zones
Tipping
Toilets
Tourist Information
Transport
Travellers with Disabilities
V
Visas and Entry Requirements
W
Websites and Internet Access
Recommended Hotels
St Peter Port
Around the Island
St Martin
St Saviour
Castel
Torteval
Vale
Herm
Sark
Alderney


Guernsey’s Top 10 Attractions




Top Attraction #1
iStock

Castle Cornet
Step into the past at Guernsey’s ancient royal fortress, standing guard over St Peter Port. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #2
Anna Mockford & Nick Bonetti/Apa Publications

St Peter Port
Explore Guernsey’s endearingly quaint capital taking in the old town and colourful port. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #3
Anna Mockford & Nick Bonetti/Apa Publications

Fort Grey
Gripping stories of shipwrecks are the theme of the museum within the fort. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #4
Alamy

Hauteville House
Victor Hugo’s home in exile shows that the French author was also an inspired interior decorator. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #5
Alamy

German Occupation Museum
Excellent war museum showing how the islanders lived during the Occupation. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #6
Anna Mockford & Nick Bonetti/Apa Publications

Sausmarez Manor
Historic family manor with delightful gardens, a fine sculpture park and visitor attractions. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #7
Anna Mockford & Nick Bonetti/Apa Publications

Vazon Bay
Ride the rollers or hire windsurf or paddleboard gear on this whopper of a sandy beach. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #8
Robert Harding World Imagery

St Anne, Alderney
The island’s capital is an engaging little town with cobbled streets and quirky shops. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #9
iStock

Shell Beach, Herm
This dazzling white beach is a paradise for shell collectors. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #10
Anna Mockford & Nick Bonetti/Apa Publications

Sark
Take a day trip to this tiny, car-free island and enjoy the walks and wildlife. For more information, click here .


A Perfect Day In Guernsey



9.00am

Breakfast
Christies in the heart of St Peter Port (43 Le Pollet, open from 8am and 9am Sun) offers a coffee-and-croissant fix or a full English breakfast. Watch the world go by or secure a seat on the balcony for lovely harbour views.


10.00am

Picture-postcard port
Explore the cobbled streets of St Peter Port, stroll along the waterfront to Cornet Castle or up to Hauteville House, where Victor Hugo penned Les Misérables .


Noon

Cliff walk
For views that inspired Impressionist painter, Renoir, take the first section of the south coast cliff path starting at South Esplanade in St Peter Port and ending at Fermain Bay, one of Guernsey’s prettiest beaches. (Allow at least an hour as there are quite a few steps).


1.00pm

Lunch break
Fermain Beach Café has the best fresh crab sandwiches on the island and a lovely terrace on the beach. Alternatively, splash out and lunch at La Frégate ( www.lafregatehotel.com ) in St Peter Port, for Guernsey’s best seafood and a terrace with a sublime view out to Herm and Sark − even as far as the coast of France on a clear day.


3.00pm

West Coast
Head west to Rocquaine Bay where Fort Grey’s Shipwreck Museum tells the grim story of vessels wrecked on the rock-strewn coasts. Portelet Harbour southwest of Fort Grey has a pretty sandy cove, ideal for a dip if the tide is out.


5.00pm

Vazon Bay
Further along the coast watch or join the surfers on the golden sands of Vazon Bay. Guernsey Surf School ( www.guernseysurfschool.co.uk ) hires out all the gear. Vistas Beach Café, right on the beach with a roof terrace, has great views.


6.00pm

Sunset cocktail
Continue along the coast to Cobo Bay and catch the last of the sun’s rays on the spacious terrace of the Cobo Bay Hotel, a favourite spot for admiring the views.


8.00pm

Dining options
Return to St Peter Port for the best choice of restaurants. Indulge in a slap-up seafood dinner at Le Nautique (for more information, click here ), Mora (for more information, click here ) or Pier 17 (for more information, click here ), all with harbour views.


10.00pm

On the town
RED, on the waterfront, has a cool cocktail bar (along with top-quality steaks); or for something more traditional try the Old Government House Hotel’s Crown Club with its red leather seats and antique brass. Familiarly known as the OGH, and located up the hill from the main shopping street, this was the former residence of the governor of Guernsey.


Introduction

Sitting just off the Cherbourg peninsula, it is not surprising that Guernsey and its little sister islands have a heady mix of French and British cultures. Author Victor Hugo, exiled to Jersey and then to Guernsey, where he wrote Les Misérables , felt perfectly at home in the Channel Islands, describing them as ‘morsels of France fallen into the sea and gathered by England’. It was this fusion of French and English culture, along with superb scenery and the sunniest location in the British Isles, that appealed to UK visitors in the early days of tourism. Although not truly British, the Channel Islands have been linked with the British Crown for over 900 years, the official language is English, cash machines dispense sterling and you drive on the left.
Guernsey may be the most densely populated of the Channel Islands but it retains quaint rural lanes, fine sandy beaches and miles of spectacular cliffs in the south. The island has one of the largest tidal movements in the world, with waters retreating twice a day to reveal large expanses of golden sands and lunar-like seascapes, pierced with rocks and reefs. Along with traditional beach pursuits such as swimming, windsurfing and rock-pooling, there has been a growth in adrenalin-fuelled activities such as sunset abseiling, cliff face rock-climbing or coasteering explorations.
In the unlikely event you tire of the coast, Guernsey has monuments ranging from eerie Neolithic tombs to Napoleonic towers and World War II bunkers and tunnels − potent reminders that the Channel Islands were the only the parts of the British Isles occupied by German forces. The south of the island offers 28 miles (45km) of cliff-top walks; and the network of Green Lanes, where traffic is restricted to 15mph (24kmh), was developed with walkers and cyclists in mind. Even on main roads the pace is slow, with a maximum speed limit of 35mph (56kmh). Not that the sedate speed limits deter the island’s affluent residents from driving around in their plush Porsches. Walking and cycling may be encouraged but Guernsey has one of the highest rates of private vehicle ownership in the world. If you are hiring a car be prepared for traffic congestion, very narrow lanes and a quaint but frustrating absence of signposting.


Toads and Donkeys

Guernsey and Jersey run their affairs separately and there has been rivalry ever since they took opposing sides in the English Civil War. To this day, Jerseymen call Guernseymen ânes or donkeys while Guernseymen call Jerseymen crapauds or toads, there being no toads on Guernsey.



Sark’s rocky coastline
Anna Mockford & Nick Bonetti/Apa Publications
Location and Climate
Guernsey lies in the Gulf of St Malo, 31 miles (50km) west of the Normandy coast and 75 miles (120km) south of Weymouth. As a bailiwick it also embraces the smaller islands of Herm, Jethou, Sark and Alderney. Herm and Sark can be easily reached by ferry (20 and 50 minutes respectively) while Alderney, the most northerly of the Channel Islands, just 8 miles (13km) from France, is more remote, taking 85 minutes by boat. In the summer the islands have a daily average of eight hours of sunshine and an average maximum temperature of 68°F (20°C). The best months to visit are from May to September, July and August being the hottest. Sea temperatures are chilly or refreshing, depending on how hardy you are, averaging 62.8°F (17.1°C) in summer.


French Spice

On a clear day you can see the French coast from Guernsey’s Jerbourg Point. Geographically the Channel Islands belong naturally to France rather than to England and have a discernible Gallic veneer. The great French Impressionist, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, who appraised Guernsey’s light with a painter’s eye at Moulin Huet Bay, noticed how ‘the Anglo-Saxon miss sheds her prudery when she arrives in Guernsey’. Victor Hugo, for his part, was prepared to broaden her mind still further: ignoring Anglo-Saxon decencies altogether, he lived on the island with both wife and mistress, introducing them respectively as ‘Madame, la mère de mes enfants’ and ‘Madame, mon amie’.
‘Peculiar of the Crown’
The Channel Islands have a quirky history and some unique, quasi-feudal customs. Termed a ‘Peculiar of the Crown’ they pledge allegiance directly to the English Crown, not to the parliament of the UK. As the last remaining territories of the dukes of Normandy, they toast the Queen of England as ‘Our Duke of Normandy’. They are not full members of the EU, although when Britain joined (the then EEC) in 1973, they were granted special privileges. The islands delegate matters of foreign policy and defence to the UK parliament but in other affairs they guard their independence zealously. Guernsey has its own government and legal system; it prints its own currency (including a £1 note) and issues its own stamps. Sark’s constitution dates back to 1563 and its feudal form of government prevailed up until 2008 when, after months of infighting, the island held its first general election and Sark became Europe’s newest democracy.



Alderney post box and telephone kiosk
Anna Mockford & Nick Bonetti/Apa Publications
Language
Guernésiais (also known as patois, Dgernésiais and Guernsey French) is the local dialect, derived from ancient Norman French. It was once the island’s native tongue but has now all but disappeared as a language spoken in the home.
Large numbers of English settlers arrived on Guernsey in the 19th century, many of them officers retired on half pay, and by the end of the century English was the prevalent language of St Peter Port. The use of the dialect as the island’s first language came to an end in the post-war period when the many children who had been evacuated during the German Occupation returned to the island speaking English. In all the country parishes, however, Guernésiais could still be heard spoken until the late 1960s. The written language can still be seen today in street names and surnames, and the Guernsey Tourist Information Office welcomes you with ‘Bian v’nue a tous’ . A small number of over 65s speak Guernésiais but as a visitor you are unlikely to hear it apart from the occasional greeting between. Sercquiais, Sark’s equivalent to Guernésiais, has also virtually disappeared as a spoken language.
Economy
Guernsey saw major changes during the late 20th century as the financial services industry took over from agriculture and tourism as the mainstay of the economy. The financial sector is now completely dominant, generating at least 40 percent of the island’s economic output and employing nearly 20 percent of the island’s workforce. Some of the traditional activities, such as dairy farming and fishing, still survive and recent years have seen the growth of small-scale producers including cheese-makers, organic farmers and specialist pig breeders.
The tourist industry started after World War II when curious sightseers arrived to see the relics of the German Occupation. From the 1950s it became a holiday paradise with a unique position close to France together with well-run, reasonably-priced hotels and guesthouses. Tourism reached its peak in the 1980s, then suffered a decline with competition from package holidays and low-cost carriers to the Mediterranean. A fortnight’s holiday to the Channel Islands is now a thing of the past and the emphasis is on upmarket short breaks. In 2008, visitors to Guernsey increased following the publication of the novel The Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society, which is set on the island during the German Occupation. A film version of the book is due to be released in 2018, which is expected to boost tourism to the island further.


A Brief History

It was around 8500 BC that Guernsey became an island, cut off from the landmass of Europe by rising sea levels. Jersey was separated 2,000 years later. Given the vulnerable location of the Channel Islands it was inevitable that they became stepping stones for plundering armies on their way to new conquests. For centuries the islands were prey to scourges of nature, easy pickings for passing pirates and reluctant pawns passed between warring rulers. Reminders of the past are scattered around Guernsey, from prehistoric graves to anti-French fortifications and chilling war tunnels from the German Occupation.



Millenium Stone, L’Ancresse Common
Anna Mockford & Nick Bonetti/Apa Publications
Early History
At the august Royal Guerns

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