Berlitz Pocket Guide Morocco (Travel Guide eBook)
113 pages
English

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Berlitz Pocket Guide Morocco (Travel Guide eBook)

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113 pages
English

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Description

Berlitz Pocket Guide Morocco 

The world-renowned pocket travel guide by Berlitz, now with a free bilingual dictionary.

Compact, concise and packed full of essential information about where to go and what to do, this is an ideal on-the-move guide for exploring Morocco. From top tourist attractions like Fez, Marrakech and the High Atlas, to cultural gems including the beautiful blue-washed town of Chefchaouen, the Imperial capital of Meknes and Roman ruins of Volubilis, and the elemental dunes of the Sahara, plan your perfect trip with this practical, all-in-one travel guide. 

Features of this travel guide to Morocco:
Inspirational itineraries: discover the best destinations, sights and excursions, highlighted with stunning photography
- Historical and cultural insights: delve into the country's rich history and culture, and learn all about its people, art and traditions
- Practical full-colour map: with every major sight and listing highlighted, the full-colour maps make on-the-ground navigation easy
- Key tips and essential information: from transport to tipping, we've got you covered
Dictionary: quick-reference bilingual language guide to help you with vocabulary 
Covers: Tangier, Chefchaouen, Rabat and Salé, Casablanca, Meknes, Volubilis and the Middle Atlas, Fez, Marrakech, the High Atlas, Ouarzazate and the desert, and the Atlantic coast.

Get the most out of your trip with: Berlitz Phrasebook and Dictionary Arabic

About Berlitz: Berlitz draws on years of travel and language expertise to bring you a wide range of travel and language products, including travel guides, maps, phrase books, language-learning courses, dictionaries and kids' language products.


Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 01 mars 2020
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9781785732720
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 3 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0015€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Exrait

- Practical full-colour map: with every major sight and listing highlighted, the full-colour maps make on-the-ground navigation easy
- Key tips and essential information: from transport to tipping, we've got you covered
Dictionary: quick-reference bilingual language guide to help you with vocabulary 
Covers: Tangier, Chefchaouen, Rabat and Salé, Casablanca, Meknes, Volubilis and the Middle Atlas, Fez, Marrakech, the High Atlas, Ouarzazate and the desert, and the Atlantic coast.

Get the most out of your trip with: Berlitz Phrasebook and Dictionary Arabic

About Berlitz: Berlitz draws on years of travel and language expertise to bring you a wide range of travel and language products, including travel guides, maps, phrase books, language-learning courses, dictionaries and kids' language products.


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How To Use This E-Book

Getting Around the e-Book
This Pocket Guide e-book is designed to give you inspiration and planning advice for your visit to Morocco, and is also the perfect on-the-ground companion for your trip.
The guide begins with our selection of Top 10 Attractions, plus a Perfect Itinerary feature to help you plan unmissable experiences. The Introduction and History chapters paint a vivid cultural portrait of Morocco, and the Where to Go chapter gives a complete guide to all the sights worth visiting. You will find ideas for activities in the What to Do section, while the Eating Out chapter describes the local cuisine and gives listings of the best restaurants. The Travel Tips offer practical information to help you plan your trip. Finally, there are carefully selected hotel listings.
In the Table of Contents and throughout this e-book you will see hyperlinked references. Just tap a hyperlink once to skip to the section you would like to read. Practical information and listings are also hyperlinked, so as long as you have an external connection to the internet, you can tap a link to go directly to the website for more information.
Maps
All key attractions and sights in Morocco are numbered and cross-referenced to high-quality maps. Wherever you see the reference [map], tap once to go straight to the related map. You can also double-tap any map for a zoom view.
Images
You’ll find lots of beautiful high-resolution images that capture the essence of Morocco. Simply double-tap an image to see it in full-screen.
About Berlitz Pocket Guides
The Berlitz story began in 1877 when Maximilian Berlitz devised his revolutionary method of language learning. More than 130 years later, Berlitz is a household name, famed not only for language schools but also as a provider of best-selling language and travel guides.
Our wide-ranging travel products – printed travel guides and phrase books, as well as apps and ebooks – offer all the information you need for a perfect trip, and are regularly updated by our team of expert local authors. Their practical emphasis means they are perfect for use on the ground. Wherever you’re going – whether it’s on a short break, the trip of a lifetime, a cruise or a business trip – we offer the ideal guide for your needs.
Our Berlitz Pocket Guides are the perfect choice if you need reliable, concise information in a handy format. We provide amazing value for money – these guides may be small, but they are packed with information. No wonder they have sold more than 45 million copies worldwide.
© 2020 Apa Digital (CH) AG and Apa Publications (UK) Ltd





Table of Contents
Morocco’s Top 10 Attractions
Top Attraction #1
Top Attraction #2
Top Attraction #3
Top Attraction #4
Top Attraction #5
Top Attraction #6
Top Attraction #7
Top Attraction #8
Top Attraction #9
Top Attraction #10
A Perfect Tour of Morocco
Introduction
Contrasting Landscapes
Climate
A Mosaic of Cultures
Moroccan Hospitality
A Brief History
The First Settlers
Roman Morocco
The Muslim Conquest
The Idrissids
The Almoravids
The Almohads
The Merinids
Christian Encroachments
The Saadians
The Alaouites
The Franco-Spanish Protectorate
Independence
The Green March
A New Era
Historical Landmarks
Where To Go
Tangier (Tanger)
The Ville Nouvelle
The Medina
Cap Spartel and the Caves of Hercules
Excursions from Tangier
Chefchaouen
Rabat and Salé
The Medina
The Mausoleum of Mohammed V
The Archaeological Museum
The Chellah Necropolis
Salé
Casablanca
Orientation
The Hassan II Mosque
Meknes (Meknès)
The Ville Nouvelle
The Imperial City
The Tomb of Moulay Ismail
The Medina
Volubilis
A Tour of the Ruins at Volubilis
Moulay Idriss
Excursions into the Middle Atlas
Fez (Fès)
The Ville Nouvelle
Fez el Jdid
Fez el Bali
The Kairaouine Mosque
Dyers and Tanners
Andalusian Quarter
A Drive Around Fez
Marrakesh
The Koutoubia Mosque
Jemaa el Fna
The Souks
Madrassa and Museum
More Souks
The Southern Medina
Garden City
Guéliz
Day Trips from Marrakesh
The High Atlas
Taroudant
Ouarzazate
The Drâa Valley
The Dadès Valley to the Desert
The Southern Atlantic Coast
Agadir
South from Agadir
Essaouira
What To Do
Shopping
Bargaining
What to Buy
Active Pursuits
Entertainment
Nightlife
Folklore and Festivals
Calendar of Events
Eating Out
A Moroccan Feast
Other Specialities
Vegetarian Dishes
Fish and Seafood
Liquid Refreshment
Sensational Snacks
Reading the Menu
To Help you Order
Menu reader
Restaurants
Tangier
Asilah
Chefchaouen
Rabat
Casablanca
Meknes
Fez
Marrakesh
Agadir
Essaouira
A–Z Travel Tips
A
Accommodation (see also Camping, Youth Hostels and Recommended Hotels)
Airports
B
Bicycle/Moped hire
Budgeting for Your Trip (See also Money)
C
Camping
Car Hire
Climate and Clothing
Complaints
Crime and Safety (See also Emergencies and Police)
D
Driving
E
Electricity
Embassies and Consulates
Emergencies (See also Police)
G
Getting There
Guides and Tours
H
Health and Medical Care (See also Emergencies)
L
Language
LGBTQ Travellers
M
Maps
Media
Money
O
Opening Hours
P
Police (See also Emergencies)
Post Offices
Public Holidays
R
Ramadan
Religion
T
Telephones
Time Zones
Tipping
Toilets
Tourist Information
Transport
Travellers with disabilities
V
Visa and Entry Requirements
W
Websites and internet access
Y
Youth Hostels
Recommended Hotels
Tangier
Asilah
Chefchaouen
Rabat
Casablanca
Meknes
Fez
Marrakesh
Taroudant
Ouarzazate
M’hamid
Agadir
Essaouira


Morocco’s Top 10 Attractions




Top Attraction #1
iStock

Chefchaouen
Beautiful blue-washed town in the heart of the Rif. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #2
iStock

Fez
World Heritage Site famed for its rich medieval architecture. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #3
iStock

Casablanca’s Hassan II Mosque and minaret
A tour de force of Moroccan architecture. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #4
Ming Tang-Evans/Apa Publications

The Sahara
The towering dunes of Erg Chigagga and Erg Chebbi. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #5
Ming Tang-Evans/Apa Publications

Essaouira
A romantic fortified town on the Atlantic coast, popular with film-makers, artists and wind-surfers, and the venue for the annual Gnaoua Festival. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #6
Ming Tang-Evans/Apa Publications

Rabat
The Hassan Tower minaret dominates the elegant capital. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #7
iStock

Meknes and Volubilis
Grand Imperial capital and atmospheric ancient Roman ruins. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #8
Ming Tang-Evans/Apa Publications

The High Atlas
Stunning landscapes and some of the best hiking and trekking in the world. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #9
Ming Tang-Evans/Apa Publications

Tangier
Morocco’s most laid-back city has inspired artists, rock stars and writers. For more information, click here .



Top Attraction #10
iStock

Marrakesh
At once African and Arab, eastern and western, this desert city is exotic, frenetic and enchanting. For more information, click here .


A Perfect Tour of Morocco



Days 1–2

Tangier–Asilah
Discover the legendary literary hang-outs of Tangier in the morning, have lunch in a café overlooking the Straits, explore the medina’s atmospheric kasbah, then sip cocktails at Villa Joséphine, on the Old Mountain, in the evening. The next day, feast on fresh fish in arty Asilah and spend the afternoon exploring the rugged coastline near the Caves of Hercules.


Day 3

Coastal drives and the Rif
Hire a car for one of the most scenic drives in Morocco, passing the Mediterranean resort towns of Cabo Negro, M’diq and Martil. Stop for lunch in the World Heritage medina of Tetouan and continue to enchanting blue Chefchaouen in the heart of the Rif.


Day 4

Chefchaouen
Wander the cobbled streets, sip mint tea in Plaza Uta el Hammam, and ride a mule into the Talassemtane National Park.


Day 5

Switchback ride to Fez
Take a day to drive a spectacular switchback route across mountains, through olive groves, and via the holy town of Ouezzane, to the medieval city of Fez. Once there, indulge in a Moroccan feast in an opulent palace riad.


Days 6–7

Fez
Explore the labyrinthine medina of Fez and have lunch at Café Clock (for more information, click here ). In the evening, watch the sun set over the city from the Merenid Tombs. The next day, drive to Volubilis and check out the extraordinary Roman ruins. Return to Fez in time to catch the evening train to Marrakesh.


Day 8

Marrakesh
Wake up in Marrakesh and dive into the mayhem of the souks. Have lunch on a roof terrace with views of the Atlas. At sunset, head to Jemaa el Fna and watch acrobats, storytellers and snake-charmers work their magic, then have dinner at a food stall.


Days 9–10

Cultural Marrakesh and a desert safari
Indulge in a day of culture, visiting the old palaces of the medina or learning how to cook a traditional tagine , then dance the night away at a chic nightclub. The next day, embark on a mini camel safari on a day trip in the Agafay desert. Back in town, dine in a romantic riad while the sound of the evening muezzin echoes across the city.


Day 11

Essaouira, the windy city
Take a bus to the captivating town of Essaouira, location for Orson Welles’ Othello . Eat freshly caught seafood at one of the food stalls by the port, then spend the afternoon exploring the medina, whose souks are full of pottery, spices, and prized thuya wood.


Day 12

On the beach
Try your hand at wind- or kite-surfing on Essaouira’s crescent beach, then spend the afternoon discovering the art of the town’s famous painters in the galleries of the medina. Watch the sun sink into the sea with a drink on the roof of local favourite, Taros (for more information, click here ).


Introduction

Morocco is one of the world’s most exotic destinations, yet it lies right on Europe’s doorstep, a mere 14km (9 miles) south of Spain. It is a country of extravagant architecture and labyrinthine walled cities; of markets filled with dazzling traditional crafts and works of delicate beauty; of windsurfers on the wild beaches of the Atlantic coast; and hikers amid the almond blossom and waterfalls of the snow-capped High Atlas mountains.


Inspiring landscape

The glorious Moroccan countryside and its exceptional quality of light have seduced famous painters including Delacroix, Dufy and Matisse.
Everywhere the pageant of life in Morocco is accompanied by music – pounding African rhythms heard in the souks of the south, or the classical Andalusian music of Meknes, Tetouan and Fez in the north, echoing the intricate, 1,000-year-old traditions of Moorish Spain. Dine by candlelight in former palaces while being serenaded by soft, trance-like Gnaoua music (brought to Morocco from West Africa centuries ago); walk through one of the exquisite gardens in Marrakesh before twilight and you’ll find them filled with birdsong.
Morocco is often breathtakingly beautiful. The idyllic and isolated Berber villages of the High Atlas seem untouched by time (except for the satellite dishes). In sophisticated cities like Fez, Essaouira and Marrakesh the medieval intricacies of their medinas go hand in hand with fashionable roof-top bars and chic renovated riads (a traditional Moroccan house with a courtyard; for more information, click here ).



Where desert meets mountain
iStock
Situated at the northwestern corner of the African continent, Morocco faces Europe across the narrow Strait of Gibraltar. It stretches for roughly 2,000km (1,240 miles) from the Mediterranean coast at Tangier to the sands of the Sahara. The country is dominated by the High and Middle Atlas Mountains, a series of parallel ranges that run southwest from the Algerian border to the Atlantic coast, isolating the coastal plain from the rest of Africa.
Contrasting Landscapes
The landscapes of Morocco are extremely varied. The jagged limestone peaks of the Rif Mountains to the southeast of Tangier give way to the cultivated coastal plains between Rabat and Casablanca and the foothills of the Atlas Mountains. The dramatic High Atlas range extends for 700km (430 miles) in a series of long ridges reaching 4,167m (13,670ft) at Jbel Toubkal, the highest peak in North Africa. South of the Atlas runs the Anti Atlas range, with its spectacular rock formations, straight through the lush Souss Valley. Further south the landscape becomes dry and desolate, as befits the fringes of the Sahara Desert, but enlivened by fertile river valleys, with pockets of terrace farming, and green splashes of date palm oases.
Climate
As with the landscape, so with the climate. The coast from Tangier to Agadir has a temperate climate, averaging 12°C (60°F) in winter and 25°C (75°F) in summer; rainfall is concentrated in the north, and falls mainly in winter; the southern beach resort of Agadir can have as many as 300 days of sunshine a year. The inland cities of Fez, Meknes and Marrakesh are slightly cooler in winter and brutally hot in summer, but the most extreme variations occur in the mountains. On the summit ridges of the Atlas, temperatures plummet to -20°C (-8°F) in midwinter, and soar to 40°C (105°F) during the summer when the desert winds blow in from the east.
A Mosaic of Cultures
Today the population of Morocco is almost 36 million, descendants of indigenous Berbers as well as of the Arabs who invaded the region in the 7th century. There are three different Berber dialects in Morocco: Tarifit in the Rif (4 million speakers), Tamazight in the High Atlas (4–5 million) and Tashalit in the Souss Valley region (7 million). Berber schools are allowed to teach in Berber rather than Arabic.



The Fez souk
Ming Tang-Evans/Apa Publications
Added to this mix are the descendants of hundreds of thousands of Muslims and Jews who fled to Morocco from El Andalus (Andalusia) in southern Spain at the time of the Christian reconquest during the 14th and 15th centuries; and the descendants of black African slaves imported from West Africa during the Saadi dynasty. In the far south of the country you will also meet the Tuareg, nomadic tribesmen of the Sahara, often identified by their blue robes.
This huge and varied country is unified by Islam, the national religion, of which the leader is King Mohammed VI, who commands great respect. Morocco is a progressive Muslim state, notably on the issue of women’s rights.


Mint Tea

No visit to a Moroccan home would be complete without the ritual of mint tea, or thé à la menthe , indisputably Morocco’s national drink. Prepared in a bulbous , or squat, curved teapot made of silver, pewter or enamel, the tea is often served in little coloured glasses. Delicious, refreshing and highly sweetened, it is made from an infusion of green tea with sprigs of fresh mint. To pour the tea, the teapot is held very high above the glass in order to aerate the liquid as it falls. Mint tea is served throughout the day and after meals (it is said to aid digestion).
Moroccan Hospitality
Moroccans, whether Arab or Berber, always offer a warm welcome to visitors, and their famous hospitality extends especially to foreign visitors. Wherever you are in Morocco, you will regularly be offered a glass or two of mint tea, and you may even receive an invitation to dine at the family home. Don’t feel obliged to take people up on their offers of dinner, however – if such a thing doesn’t appeal, a polite excuse will suffice, and offers of this kind should not be viewed with suspicion.
If you have the chance to get off the beaten track and stay in a Berber village in the mountains, the experience will linger in your memory long after you return home.


A Brief History

Morocco is a vast and varied territory that was only relatively recently united into a modern nation state. Its long history records a struggle for ascendancy between the Berber tribes of the mountains and the Arabs of the plains, the rise and fall of powerful dynasties, the creation and collapse of mighty empires, and, from the 18th century, manipulation and exploitation by European powers seeking to expand their empires.



Traditional Berber dress has not changed for centuries
Chris Coe/Apa Publications
The First Settlers
The ancient Greeks called this land the country of Atlas, after the Titan who was condemned by Zeus to bear the heavens upon his shoulders. Here, at the western extremity of their world, where the chariot of the sun god Helios vanished over the horizon each night and the Hesperides, or Daughters of Evening, tended their magical garden, Atlas watched over his herds of sheep and cattle. According to a later legend, the hero Perseus showed him the head of the Gorgon Medusa to punish him for refusing to give him shelter, and Atlas was turned into the mountain range that still bears his name.
The Phoenicians were the first to explore this far western land, setting up a trading post at Liks (Lixus) on the Moroccan coast around 1000 BC. In the succeeding centuries they and their descendants, the Carthaginians, founded outposts at Tangier and Essaouira, while also building a town on the site of present-day Rabat. Greek traders called the fierce inhabitants of the interior barbaroi , meaning ‘not of our people’, a name that has persisted through the ages as ‘Berber’ (the English word ‘barbarian’ has the same root).
The origins of the Berbers (self-titled Amazigh) remain a mystery. Some theories link them with the Celts, the Basques, and even the tribes of Canaan (northern Lebanon), but it’s far more likely that they are descendants of the Neolithic Capsian culture, which spread through North Africa during the 5th and 6th millennia BC. Berbers have preserved their own languages and traditional customs to the present day.
Throughout the 3rd and 4th centuries BC, Berber kingdoms were established in many parts of Morocco. From these small strongholds, over the course of the next thousand years, the Berber people were to build mighty empires that ruled all of North Africa and most of Spain. First, however, came the Romans.
Roman Morocco
After the ancient city of Carthage (near modern Tunis) fell to Rome in 146 BC, the North African coast to the west was added to the Roman Empire as the provinces of Numidia (which roughly corresponds to modern Algeria) and Mauretania (modern Morocco). From 25 BC to AD 23 Mauretania was ruled by Juba II, a young Berber king installed by the Emperor Augustus. A fine scholar, Juba was educated in Rome and made journeys to countries in distant parts of Arabia to gather material for the many books he wrote. His wife, Cleopatra Selene, was the daughter of Mark Antony and Cleopatra.
The Romans developed the city of Sala Colonia (modern Chellah) on the site of present-day Rabat, but the Roman Empire made few deep inroads into Morocco, so the language and culture of the mountain Berbers were little affected by Roman civilisation.



Volubilis, Morocco’s most extensive Roman remains
iStock
The Muslim Conquest
The 7th century saw the rise of Islam in Arabia. In the early years believers were organised into a small, close-knit community headed by the Prophet Mohammed. Within a century of Mohammed’s death in AD 632, Muslim armies had conquered the whole of the Middle East, including Persia, all of North Africa and parts of Spain and France.
In 670 the Arab general Oqba ibn Nafi founded the holy city of Kairouan in Tunisia. From Kairouan, in 682, Oqba led his raiding armies all the way to the Atlantic coast of Morocco. He named the land al Maghrib al Aqsa , Arabic for ‘the furthest west’. This remains Morocco’s name in Arabic to this day.
The prospect of an invasion of the rich Spanish peninsula made many Berbers convert to Islam and join the Muslim armies to carry the banner of Islam across the Mediterranean. For the next six centuries, the Islamic civilisation of Spain and Morocco outshone anything in Christian Europe.
From the time of the Muslim Conquest to the formation of a Protectorate in the 20th century, the political history of Morocco is that of an uninterrupted succession of dynasties. After consolidating power, subduing enemies, and building monumental cities, mosques and palaces, each successive regime slid into decadence, leading to weak government, political chaos and bitter fighting, until a new faction stepped in to fill the power vacuum.

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