Summary of Susan Nolen-Hoeksema s Women Who Think Too Much
34 pages
English

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris

Summary of Susan Nolen-Hoeksema's Women Who Think Too Much , livre ebook

-

Découvre YouScribe en t'inscrivant gratuitement

Je m'inscris
Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus
34 pages
English

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus

Description

Please note: This is a companion version & not the original book.
Sample Book Insights:
#1 Women are more likely than men to fall into overthinking and remain stuck there. Take, for example, Veronica, a 27-year-old full-time mom with auburn hair and dancing brown eyes. She adored caring for her twin toddlers, but she found herself slipping into the muck of negativity and concern called overthinking: What’s wrong with me.
#2 Women are twice as likely as men to become severely depressed or anxious, and our tendency to overthink appears to be one of the reasons why. We can rise above this epidemic of emotional oversensitivity and hypervolatility and learn to recognize and appropriately express the emotions we experience.
#3 Overthinking is like trying to escape from quicksand. The first step to overcoming it is to break the grip of your thoughts so that they don’t continue to pull you down further, and eventually smother you.
#4 Jenny was able to deal with her conflict with Sean by using a number of strategies to break the grip of her angry thoughts. She broke free from her initial ramblings by giving them a rest. She used a healthy, active distraction to release her mind from her negative thoughts.

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 01 avril 2022
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9781669376095
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 1 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0150€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Extrait

Insights on Susan Nolen-Hoeksema's Women Who Think Too Much
Contents Insights from Chapter 1 Insights from Chapter 2 Insights from Chapter 3
Insights from Chapter 1



#1

Women are more likely than men to fall into overthinking and remain stuck there. Take, for example, Veronica, a 27-year-old full-time mom with auburn hair and dancing brown eyes. She adored caring for her twin toddlers, but she found herself slipping into the muck of negativity and concern called overthinking: What’s wrong with me.

#2

Women are twice as likely as men to become severely depressed or anxious, and our tendency to overthink appears to be one of the reasons why. We can rise above this epidemic of emotional oversensitivity and hypervolatility and learn to recognize and appropriately express the emotions we experience.

#3

Overthinking is like trying to escape from quicksand. The first step to overcoming it is to break the grip of your thoughts so that they don’t continue to pull you down further, and eventually smother you.

#4

Jenny was able to deal with her conflict with Sean by using a number of strategies to break the grip of her angry thoughts. She broke free from her initial ramblings by giving them a rest. She used a healthy, active distraction to release her mind from her negative thoughts.

#5

Overthinking can be caused by negative emotions, such as sadness, anxiety, or anger. It can be difficult to see how or why we should avoid these thoughts. But overthinking can interfere with our ability to cope, damage our self-worth, and contribute to unwise decisions.

#6

When you overthink, you go over and over your negative thoughts and feelings, examining them, questioning them, and kneading them like dough. You may begin with thoughts about a recent conflict with a friend, and then move on. But eventually, your negative thoughts will spread to other events and situations in your life and to big questions you have about yourself.

#7

Franny’s overthinking is causing her pain and paralysis in her life. If it continues, Franny risks destroying her relationship with Andrew and harming her career and health.

#8

There are three primary types of overthinking: rant-and-rave, life-of-their-own, and chaotic. When we overthink, we tend to focus on designing a retribution that will severely sting our victimizers. But overthinking can cause us to see problems that don’t exist or aren’t as big as our thoughts make them out to be.

#9

When you feel upset, how do you typically respond. For each response below, rate whether you generally engage in this response never or almost never, sometimes, often, or always or almost always when you feel upset.

#10

Overthinking is not the same as simple worry. Overthinkers are great worriers, but they do much more than worry. They are constantly thinking about things that have happened in the past, and they become dead certain that something bad has already happened.

#11

When we overthink, we look through the distorted lens of our negative mood, and we follow the brightly lit paths in our brain to the negative nodes. These paths are all connected by our negative mood, so as we leave one negative node, we immediately go down another brightly lit path to another negative node.

#12

Overthinking can make life harder, and it can contribute to serious mental disorders, including depression, severe anxiety, and alcohol abuse. It can also make people react to a traumatic event in a more intense and lasting way.

#13

Overthinking can lead to depression after a traumatic event. It can also lead to post-traumatic stress disorder, which is a collection of symptoms such as anxiety, a feeling of numbness, and being watchful for danger.

#14

Overthinkers and nonoverthinkers can experience different reactions to the same situation. Nonoverthinkers just don’t understand why overthinkers don’t get over it and move on, while overthinkers can feel misunderstood by nonoverthinkers who seem unsympathetic and coldhearted.

#15

When people lose a loved one to death, it’s normal for them to experience grief-related depression. Overthinking is especially toxic in the context of loss, as people who were chronic overthinkers had more depressive symptoms around the time of the loss, and through the eighteen months following the loss.

#16

When Karen’s sister died of cancer, she was in a state of shock. She began overthinking her life, and eventually her breast, and decided she had cancer and was going to die. She was also convinced she was going to commit suicide.

#17

Overthinking can contribute to prolonged, severe grief reactions that greatly impair the health and well-being of bereaved people. It can also severely impair people’s relationships.

#18

Women are twice as likely as men to develop depression, and overthinking is one of the reasons why. Women were more likely than the men in the study to say they overthink when they feel sad or anxious, and they were also more likely to be depressed.

#19

Overthinking can be very negative and can lead to depression. It does not provide you with clarity or insight into your past or present, but it does pollute your thinking with negativity that can lead to depression.

#20

Overthinking can lead to depression, as it causes you to travel down only the dark and dreary memory lanes of your past, which are marked by failure, loss, and disappointment. Your perspective on your past is greatly unbalanced toward the negative.

#21

Overthinking can make you more negative in your thinking about your past, present, and future. It can also interfere with your ability to come up with good solutions to your problems and drain your confidence and motivation in implementing any solution.

#22

Overthinking is equally toxic for men and women. It is as likely to lead to depression, negative thinking, and poor problem solving in men as in women. However, women are more likely to overthink and experience its dangerous consequences.

#23

Amy’s day might start off perfectly fine, as she drives her SUV down the highway toward her job as a paralegal in a major law firm. But her overthinking soon begins, as she begins to think about what her supervisor, Stu, told her.

#24

We can overthink for many different reasons, and women are more prone to this than men. The brain is organized to overthink, and social circumstances can push us into overthinking.

  • Univers Univers
  • Ebooks Ebooks
  • Livres audio Livres audio
  • Presse Presse
  • Podcasts Podcasts
  • BD BD
  • Documents Documents