Black, White, and Catholic
313 pages
English

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313 pages
English
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Description

Most histories of the Civil Rights Movement start with all the players in place--among them organized groups of African Americans, White Citizens' Councils, nervous politicians, and religious leaders struggling to find the right course. Anderson, however, takes up the historical moment right before that, when small groups of black and white Catholics in the city of New Orleans began efforts to desegregate the archdiocese, and the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) began, in fits and starts, to integrate quietly the New Orleans Province.

Anderson leads readers through the tumultuous years just after World War II when the Roman Catholic Church in the American South struggled to reconcile its commitment to social justice with the legal and social heritage of Jim Crow society. Though these early efforts at reform, by and large, failed, they did serve to galvanize Catholic supporters and opponents of the Civil Rights Movement and provided a model for more successful efforts at desegregation in the '60s.

As a Jesuit himself, Anderson has access to archives that remain off-limits to other scholars. His deep knowledge of the history of the Catholic Church also allows him to draw connections between this historical period and the present. In the resistance to desegregation, Anderson finds expression of a distinctly American form of Catholicism, in which lay people expect Church authorities to ratify their ideas and beliefs in an almost democratic fashion. The conflict he describes is as much between popular and hierarchical models of the Church as between segregation and integration.


This book has been made possible through a grant from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.


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Publié par
Date de parution 29 décembre 2008
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9780826591937
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 2 Mo

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Black, White,  and Catholic
New Orleans Interracialism, 1947–1956
R. BENTLEY ANDERSON
Black, White, and Catholic
Black, White, and Catholic: New Orleans Interracialism, 1947–1956
R . B E N T L E Y A N D E R S O N
Vanderbilt University PressnNashville
© 2005 Vanderbilt University Press All rights reserved First Edition 2005
Printed on acid-free paper Manufactured in the United States of America Design by Ellen Beeler
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Anderson, R. Bentley, 1959– Black, White, and Catholic : New Orleans interracialism, 1947–1956 / R. Bentley Anderson.— 1st ed. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references. ISBN 0-8265-1483-9 (cloth : alk. paper) 1. New Orleans (La.)—Race relations—History—20th century. 2. Catholics—Louisiana—New Orleans—Attitudes—History—20th century. 3. Catholics—Louisiana—New Orleans—Social conditions—20th century. I. Title. F380.A1A53 2005 305.8’0097633509’041—dc22 2005005034
Publication of this book has been supported by a grant from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, an affiliate of the National Endowment of the Humanities.
Material from Chapters 5 and 9 appeared previously in slightly different form as “Black, White, and Catholic: Southern Jesuits Confront the Race Question, 1952,”Catholic Historical Review91 (July 2005): 484–505. Used with permission of the American Catholic Historical Association. A portion of chapter seven appeared in “Prelates, Protest, and Public Opinion: Catholic Opposition to Desegregation, 1947–1955,”Journal of Church and State46 (summer 2004): 617–44. Used with permission.
TO MY PARENTS
ROBERT BENTLEY ANDERSON, JR.
AND
JANET RIVET ANDERSON
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Preface
C O N T E N T S
Introduction: New Orleans, the Land of Creoles and Catholics
Chapter I. The Genesis of Southern Catholic Interracialism, 1917–1947
Chapter II. Interracial Agitation: Raising Awareness, 1948
Chapter III. Interracial Activism: Belief in Practice, 1948–1949
Chapter IV. Catholic Choice: Jim Crowism or Jesus Christ, 1949–1952
Chapter V. “Norman Francis Is a Negro”: Desegregating Catholic Colleges, 1952–1953
Chapter VI. Bearing Fruit: Catholic Interracialism in the Age ofBrown,1952–1956
Chapter VII. The Rise of Southern Catholic Resistance, 1955–1956
Chapter VIII. The Death of Southern Catholic Interracialism, 1956
Chapter IX. Southern Catholics, Martin Luther King, Jr., and “Letter from Birmingham Jail”
Appendix A. Population of Catholic College Students in New Orleans, 1947–1956
ix
xi
xiii
1
11
26
50
72
98
111
142
165
190
199
viiinBlack, White, and Catholic: New Orleans Interracialism 1947–1956
Appendix B. Manhattanville Resolutions
Appendix C. Resolution Passed by Members of the Southeastern Regional Interracial Commission, Summer, 1948
Appendix D. Resolution 5C 48-10 Passed by the Delegates to the Fifth National Congress of the National Federation of Catholic College Students, 1948
Appendix E. Resolution 5C 48-17 Passed by the Delegates to the Fifth National Congress of the National Federation of Catholic College Students, 1948
Appendix F. Concerning Inter-racial Relations at Loyola University
Appendix G. Working Draft and Final Resolution Passed at First Regional Congress of the NFCCS, 1949
Appendix H. Resolution Introduced by the Delegates from the New York-New Jersey Region at the Tenth National Congress of the NFCCS, 1953
Appendix I. Resolution to be Presented to the Dads’ Club of the Holy Name of Jesus School on October 24, 1955
Notes
Bibliography
Index
201
202
203
204
205
208
210
211
213
263
283
IL L U ST R AT IO N S
Joseph H. Fichter, S.J.
Officers of the National Federation of Catholic College Students
Poster announcing 1st Interracial Sunday gathering
Rev. Leander Martin, S.V.D., Larry Brown, and Joan Forshag
Interracial intercollegiate men’s basketball
Interracial intercollegiate women’s basketball
Benjamin Johnson and Philip Ogilvie
Oratorical contest participants
Norman Francis, Thomas Tierney, and chaplain Joseph Fichter
Dorothy MacCandless’s award winning poster
Ernest “Dutch” Morial, A. P. Tureaud, Janet Riley, and John P. Nelson
7th annual Interracial Sunday gathering poster
66
67
68
69
70
71
136
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138
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141
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