Cell Biology E-Book
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1526 pages
English

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Description

A masterful introduction to the cell biology that you need to know! This critically acclaimed textbook offers you a modern and unique approach to the study of cell biology. It emphasizes that cellular structure, function, and dysfunction ultimately result from specific macromolecular interactions. You'll progress from an explanation of the "hardware" of molecules and cells to an understanding of how these structures function in the organism in both healthy and diseased states. The exquisite art program helps you to better visualize molecular structures.
  • Covers essential concepts in a more efficient, reader-friendly manner than most other texts on this subject.
  • Makes cell biology easier to understand by demonstrating how cellular structure, function, and dysfunction result from specific macromole¬cular interactions.
  • Progresses logically from an explanation of the "hardware" of molecules and cells to an understanding of how these structures function in the organism in both healthy and diseased states.
  • Helps you to visualize molecular structures and functions with over 1500 remarkable full-color illustrations that present physical structures to scale.
  • Explains how molecular and cellular structures evolved in different organisms.
  • Shows how molecular changes lead to the development of diseases through numerous Clinical Examples throughout.
  • Includes STUDENT CONSULT access at no additional charge, enabling you to consult the textbook online, anywhere you go · perform quick searches · add your own notes and bookmarks · follow Integration Links to related bonus content from other STUDENT CONSULT titles—to help you see the connections between diverse disciplines · test your knowledge with multiple-choice review questions · and more!
  • New keystone chapter on the origin and evolution of life on earth probably the best explanation of evolution for cell biologists available!
  • Spectacular new artwork by gifted artist Graham Johnson of the Scripps Research Institute in San Diego. 200 new and 500 revised figures bring his keen insight to Cell Biology illustration and further aid the reader’s understanding.
  • New chapters and sections on the most dynamic areas of cell biology - Organelles and membrane traffic by Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz; RNA processing (including RNAi) by David Tollervey., updates on stem cells and DNA Repair.
  • ,More readable than ever. Improved organization and an accessible new design increase the focus on understanding concepts and mechanisms.
  • New guide to figures featuring specific organisms and specialized cells paired with a list of all of the figures showing these organisms. Permits easy review of cellular and molecular mechanisms.
  • New glossary with one-stop definitions of over 1000 of the most important terms in cell biology.

Sujets

Ebooks
Savoirs
Medecine
Derecho de autor
Replicón
Adaptation.
Rizópodo
Realimentación
Protozoo
Ácido desoxirribonucleico
Exón
Mitocondria
Reino Unido
Codón
Ácido ribonucleico
Célula madre
Barbiturate
Protozoa
Fungus
Prokaryote
Benzene
Gap junction protein, alpha 1
Membrane channel
LMNA
Symporter
Biology
DNA adduct
Serine/threonine-specific protein kinase
Receptor tyrosine kinase
Holliday junction
Vitality
Replicon
Insertion sequence
Actin-binding protein
Ceramide
Microtubule-associated protein
Second messenger system
Cell junction
Cell adhesion molecule
Plant virus
Protein S
Vimentin
Morales
S phase
Cadherin
Protein kinase C
Muscle contraction
Sterol
Sphingolipid
Antiporter
Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor
Biological agent
Maturation promoting factor
Dynein
Kinesin
Tubulin
Satellite DNA
Cell adhesion
Osteoarthritis
Intermediate filament
Lamin
Clathrin
Myosin
Physician assistant
Daughter
Actin
Cyclic guanosine monophosphate
Fibrillation
Protein subunit
Signal recognition particle
Cytogenetics
Hypersensitivity
Initiator
Protoplasm
Rhodopsin
Circular DNA
Connective tissue
Extracellular matrix
Mentorship
Cytokinesis
Membrane protein
Chaperone (protein)
Posttranslational modification
Tobacco mosaic virus
Gene expression
Integral membrane protein
Homology (biology)
Electron transport chain
Adenosine monophosphate
Protein folding
Tyrosine kinase
Philadelphia
Keratin
Morality
Flagellum
Ubiquitin
United Kingdom
Transcription factor
Transposon
Stem cell
Protein targeting
Protein kinase
Protein biosynthesis
Phospholipid
Peroxisome
Plasmid
Polymerase
Physiology
Organelle
Neurotransmitter
Nucleosome
Nucleic acid
Mitosis
Messenger RNA
Mitochondrion
Microscopy
Mechanics
Molecule
Meiosis
Lipid
Ion channel
Integrin
Invertebrate
Immune system
Hydrogen bond
Growth factor
Genetic
G protein
Golgi apparatus
Genome
Genetic code
Feedback
Fatty acid
Endocytosis
Endoplasmic reticulum
Cell membrane
Cell cycle
Chlorophyll
Chromatin
Cholesterol
Cell nucleus
Collagen
Chemical element
Biochemistry
Apoptosis
Amino acid
Amoeboid
Moving
Cholestérol
Necrosis
Human
Chloride
Moralès
Duplicate
Gene
Réplicon
Trust
Chlamydomonas
Insight
Phosphorylation
Release
Mentor
Ribozyme
Guanosine triphosphate
Electronic
Adaptation
Centrosome
Mutation
RNA
Caspase
Microtubule
Exon
Intron
Rétroaction
Philadelphie
DNA
Troubles du rythme cardiaque
Codon
Lactose
Surface
Polypeptide
Peptide
Protozoaire
Chromosome
4
Transcription
Gênes
Potassium
Copyright
Molécule
Génome
1
Benzène
Enzyme
Adénosine triphosphate
Glucose
Virus
Royaume-Uni
Archaea

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 26 avril 2007
Nombre de lectures 10
EAN13 9781437700633
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 22 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0478€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Extrait

Cell Biology
Second Edition

THOMAS D. POLLARD, MD
Sterling Professor, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

WILLIAM C. EARNSHAW, PhD, FRSE
Professor and Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow, Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, ICB, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom

WITH JENNIFER LIPPINCOTT-SCHWARTZ, PhD
Head, Section on Organelle Biology, Cell Biology and Metabolism Branch, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland

Illustrated by Graham T. Johnson
SAUNDERS ELSEVIER
Dedication
To Patty and Margarete and our families
The authors also express gratitude to their mentors, who helped to shape their views of how science should be conducted. Tom Pollard thanks Sus Ito and Ed Korn for the opportunity to learn microscopy and biochemistry under their guidance. He also thanks Hugh Huxley and Ed Taylor for their contributions as role models, his former colleagues at Johns Hopkins University for their insights regarding biophysics, and Susan Forsburg for her help in the area of yeast biology. Bill Earnshaw thanks, in particular, Jonathan King, Stephen Harrison, Aaron Klug, Tony Crowther, Ron Laskey, and Uli Laemmli, who provided a diverse range of incredibly rich environments in which to learn that science at the highest level is an adventure that lasts a lifetime.
Copyright
SAUNDERS ELSEVIER
1600 John F. Kennedy Blvd.
Suite 1800
Philadelphia, PA 19103-2899
CELL BIOLOGY
ISBN-13: 978-1-4160-2255-8
SECOND EDITION
ISBN-10: 1-4160-2255-4
INTERNATIONAL EDITION
ISBN-13: 978-0-8089-2352-7
ISBN-10: 0-8089-2352-8
Copyright © 2008, 2004 by Thomas D. Pollard, William C. Earnshaw, Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz: Published by Elsevier Inc.
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Permissions may be sought directly from Elsevier’s Health Sciences Rights Department in Philadelphia, PA, USA: phone: (+1) 215 239 3804, fax: (+1) 215 239 3805, e-mail: healthpermissions@elsevier.com . You may also complete your request on-line via the Elsevier homepage ( http://www.elsevier.com ), by selecting “Customer Support” and then “Obtaining Permissions.”

Notice
Knowledge and best practice in this field are constantly changing. As new research and experience broaden our knowledge, changes in practice, treatment, and drug therapy may become necessary or appropriate. Readers are advised to check the most current information provided (i) on procedures featured or (ii) by the manufacturer of each product to be administered, to verify the recommended dose or formula, the method and duration of administration, and contraindications. It is the responsibility of the practitioners, relying on their own experience and knowledge of the patients, to make diagnoses, to determine dosages and the best treatment for each individual patient, and to take all appropriate safety precautions. To the fullest extent of the law, neither the Publisher nor the Authors assume any liability for any injury and/or damage to persons or property arising out of or related to any use of the material contained in this book.
The Publisher
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Pollard, Thomas D. (Thomas Dean), 1942–Cell biology/Thomas D. Pollard, William C. Earnshaw; with Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz; illustrated by Graham T. Johnson.—2nd ed.
p. cm.
Includes bibliographical references (p.).
ISBN 1-4160-2255-4
1. Cytology. I. Earnshaw, William C. II. Title.
QH581.2.P65 2008
571.6—dc22
2006048515
Publishing Director: William Schmitt
Managing Editor: Rebecca Gruliow
Senior Developmental Editor: Jacquie Mahon
Publishing Services Manager: Joan Sinclair
Senior Book Designer: Ellen Zanolle
Marketing Manager: John Gore
Printed in China
Last digit is the print number: 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Contributors

Jeffrey L. Corden, PhD, Professor, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Johns Hopkins Medical School, Baltimore, Maryland

David Tollervey, PhD, Professor, Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom
Preface to the Second Edition
I t has pleased us to know how useful the first edition of Cell Biology has been for both undergraduate and graduate students. We have benefited from using the book in the classroom and from helpful feedback from our students. We have also benefited from feedback from other teachers and their students, particularly Ursula Goodenough at Washington University in St. Louis. This experience validated the approach that we used for much of the material but also gave us the opportunity to identify concepts that might be presented more clearly. In response to student feedback, we reduced nonessential jargon by eliminating a number of terms that appeared only once. This helps to move the reader’s focus away from nomenclature and toward an understanding of concepts. As part of our concentration on concepts and mechanisms, we moved the larger tables containing lists of specific molecules to chapter appendixes, where they can be consulted as references without disturbing the flow of the text.
We added Chapter 2 , which addresses the origin of life and the evolution of the three domains of life. Evolution is not only the most important general principle in biology but also one of this text’s major organizing principles.
For the second edition, we recruited a very important new member of our team. Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz rewrote the material on membrane traffic and reorganized it into three new chapters that cover the endoplasmic reticulum ( Chapter 20 ), the secretory pathway ( Chapter 21 ), and the endocytic pathway ( Chapter 22 ). Her contribution adds a new dimension that brings us up to date in one of the most dynamic areas of cell biology.
Graham Johnson, now a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellow in biophysics at the Scripps Research Institute in San Diego, remains an integral member of our team. For this edition, he added nearly 200 new figures and revised 500 figures from the first edition. His artistic gift and keen insights are evident in each of the illustrations.
Cell biology is an incredibly exciting and dynamic science. To keep our information current, we updated each chapter with the latest data about how cells work at the molecular level. Many new insights derived from real time microscopy of live cells expressing fluorescent fusion proteins. Examples include (1) the discovery that slow axonal transport is really just intermittent fast transport, (2) the discovery that many nuclear proteins are surprisingly mobile, and (3) the observation of flux of subunits within the mitotic spindle. Some particularly informative new insights came from crystal structures of a riboswitch, a new ABC translocator, several carrier proteins, several ion channels, the signal recognition particle receptor GTPase, SecYE translocon, clathrin, the EGF receptor, receptor serine/threonine kinases bound to their ligand, guanylylcyclase receptors, Toll-like receptors, the regulatory subunit bound to PKA, integrins, formins, CAD nuclease, Wee1 kinase, RFC, Mad1, Mad2, apoptosome, the Holliday junction, SCF, and other macromolecules. Careful editing allowed the inclusion of new material without significantly increasing the length of the second edition.
One reviewer of the first edition expressed concern that our coverage of cells and tissues was embedded in chapters on mechanisms. It is true that we place great emphasis on mechanisms at the cellular and molecular level, but we do so by using frequent examples from diverse experimental organisms and specialized cells and tissues of vertebrate animals to illustrate the general principles. The Guide to Figures Featuring Specific Organisms and Specialized Cells that follows the Contents lists figures by organism and cell. The relevant text accompanies the figures. The reader who wishes to assemble a unit on cellular and molecular mechanisms in the immune system, for example, will find the relevant material associated with the figures that cover lymphocytes/immune system.

Organization of the Book
We use molecular structures as the starting point for explaining how each cellular system is constructed and how it operates. Most of the ten major sections begin with one or more chapters that cover the key molecules that run the systems under consideration. For example, the section on Signaling Mechanisms begins with separate chapters on receptors, cytoplasmic signal transduction proteins, and second messengers. Noting the concentrations of key molecules and the rates of their reactions should help the student to appreciate the rapidly moving molecular environment inside cells.
We retained the general organization of the first edition, particularly the use of introductory chapters that present the machinery used in each cellular system as a precursor to the chapters that integrate concepts and describe the physiology. We moved the mechanism of the Ras GTPase from the signaling section to Chapter 4 , which covers biochemical and biophysical mechanisms. This arrangement not only presents Ras as an excellent example of how to dissect an enzyme mechanism by transient kinetic analysis but also provides an early introduction of GTPases that prepares the reader for thei

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