Griffith s Instructions for Patients E-Book
3413 pages
English

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Griffith's Instructions for Patients E-Book

-

Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus
3413 pages
English

Vous pourrez modifier la taille du texte de cet ouvrage

Obtenez un accès à la bibliothèque pour le consulter en ligne
En savoir plus

Description

With over 430 patient instruction fact sheets and an additional 123 patient instruction sheets online, the new edition of Griffith's Instructions for Patients by Stephen W. Moore, MD, helps patients understand what their illness is, how it will affect their regular routine, what self care is required, and when to call a doctor. Consistently formatted and organized by topic for easy use, it provides descriptions of each illness, including frequent signs and symptoms, possible causes, risks, preventive measures, expected outcomes, possible complications, and treatments. Newly added topics include Chronic Pain Syndrome; Dry Eye Syndrome; Incontinence, Fecal; Influenza, H1N1; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA); Mold Allergy; Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome; Perimenopause; Sarcopenia; Spinal Stenosis; and Stroke, Silent. Printable instruction sheets in English and Spanish, 23 separate patient information guides to various types of diets (from "Adult Regular Healthy Diet" to "Weight-Reduction Diet") are downloadable at expertconsult.com.

Quickly find what you need with consistently formatted guides – organized by topic for easy use!

  • Help your patients understand what their illness is, how it will affect their regular routine, what self care is required, and when to call a doctor thanks to over 430 patient education guides (and an additional 123 guides online!) reflecting the latest therapeutic information.
  • Ensure the best patient encounters and outcomes with downloadable, customizable English and Spanish patient education guides on expertconsult.com.

Educate your patients about timely topics such as Chronic Pain Syndrome; Dry Eye Syndrome; Incontinence, Fecal; Influenza, H1N1; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA); Mold Allergy; Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome; Perimenopause; Sarcopenia; Spinal Stenosis; and Stroke, Silent.


Sujets

Ebooks
Savoirs
Medecine
Dieta
Derecho de autor
BASICA
Vómito
Nariz
Gripe
Season
Cirrhosis
Sickle-cell disease
Meningitis
Myocardial infarction
Influenza
Kaposi's sarcoma
Breastfeeding
Nausea
Photocopier
Acne
The Only Son
Zinc deficiency
Vomiting
Types of chocolate
Health care provider
Vegetable
AIDS
Laser surgery
Pregnancy
Family medicine
Nasal septum deviation
Protein S
Otitis externa
Neoplasm
Dyspepsia
Nevus
Cutaneous conditions
Chronic kidney disease
Food allergy
Stroke
Iron deficiency anemia
Rhinitis
Hypercholesterolemia
Osteoarthritis
Physician assistant
Weakness
Allergic rhinitis
Weight loss
Biopsy
Hypersensitivity
Vaginitis
Dyspareunia
Gallstone
Tendinitis
Otitis media
Irritable bowel syndrome
General practitioner
Gastroesophageal reflux disease
Oatmeal
Genital wart
Human papillomavirus
Urinary incontinence
Dehydration
Bleeding
Arrowroot
Anemia
Sodium chloride
Hypertension
Glaucoma
Brine
Headache
Nutrient
Infant formula
Peptic ulcer
Obesity
Vitamin A
Diarrhea
Pneumonia
Nut
Multiple sclerosis
Philadelphia
Printing
Diabetes mellitus
Hepatitis
Encephalitis
Infection
Wheat
Wart
Varicose veins
Sinusitis
Data storage device
Pelvic inflammatory disease
Pediatrics
Malaria
Mechanics
Leukemia
French fries
Food
Diet
Major depressive disorder
Dairy product
Drink
Chemotherapy
Cereal
Cholesterol
Carbohydrate
Bacterial vaginosis
Yoga
Hypertension artérielle
Divine Insanity
Cholestérol
Headache (EP)
Bread
Feed
Rabies
Potato
Acupuncture
Serine
Chocolate
Instruction
Cook
Dessert
Tyramine
Hordeum
Fatigue
Electronic
Margarine
Gluten
Acné
Maladie infectieuse
Philadelphie
Lactose
Grippe
Paludisme
Syncope
Son
Tortilla
Nutrition
Zinc
Calcium
Sodium
Copyright

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 02 août 2010
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9781437735680
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 2 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0283€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Exrait

Quickly find what you need with consistently formatted guides – organized by topic for easy use!

  • Help your patients understand what their illness is, how it will affect their regular routine, what self care is required, and when to call a doctor thanks to over 430 patient education guides (and an additional 123 guides online!) reflecting the latest therapeutic information.
  • Ensure the best patient encounters and outcomes with downloadable, customizable English and Spanish patient education guides on expertconsult.com.

Educate your patients about timely topics such as Chronic Pain Syndrome; Dry Eye Syndrome; Incontinence, Fecal; Influenza, H1N1; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA); Mold Allergy; Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome; Perimenopause; Sarcopenia; Spinal Stenosis; and Stroke, Silent.


" />

GRIFFITH’S INSTRUCTIONS for PATIENTS
Eighth Edition

Stephen W. Moore, M.D.
Tucson, Arizona
SAUNDERS
Copyright
SAUNDERS ELSEVIER
1600 John F. Kennedy Blvd.
Ste 1800
Philadelphia, PA 19103-2899
GRIFFITH’S INSTRUCTIONS FOR PATIENTS
EIGHTH EDITION
ISBN: 978-1-4377-0909-4
Copyright © 2011, 2005, 1998, 1994, 1989, 1982, 1975, 1968 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier Inc.
Copyright renewed 1996 by Jo A. Griffith
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher, except for the printing of complete pages, with the copyright notice, for instructional use and not for resale. Details on how to seek permission, further information about the Publisher’s permissions policies and our arrangements with organizations such as the Copyright Clearance Center and the Copyright Licensing Agency, can be found at our website: www.elsevier.com/permissions .
This book and the individual contributions contained in it are protected under copyright by the Publisher (other than as may be noted herein).


Notices
Knowledge and best practice in this field are constantly changing. As new research and experience broaden our understanding, changes in research methods, professional practices, or medical treatment may become necessary.
Practitioners and researchers must always rely on their own experience and knowledge in evaluating and using any information, methods, compounds, or experiments described herein. In using such information or methods they should be mindful of their own safety and the safety of others, including parties for whom they have a professional responsibility.
With respect to any drug or pharmaceutical products identified, readers are advised to check the most current information provided (i) on procedures featured or (ii) by the manufacturer of each product to be administered, to verify the recommended dose or formula, the method and duration of administration, and contraindications. It is the responsibility of practitioners, relying on their own experience and knowledge of their patients, to make diagnoses, to determine dosages and the best treatment for each individual patient, and to take all appropriate safety precautions.
To the fullest extent of the law, neither the Publisher nor the authors, contributors, or editors, assume any liability for any injury and/or damage to persons or property as a matter of products liability, negligence or otherwise, or from any use or operation of any methods, products, instructions, or ideas contained in the material herein.
ISBN: 978-1-4377-0909-4
Acquisitions Editor: Dolores Meloni
Editorial Assistant: Justin Hare
Publishing Services Manager: Patricia Tannian
Senior Project Manager: Sharon Corell
Design Direction: Steve Stave
With the assistance of Jo A. Griffith
Printed in the United States of America
Last digit is the print number: 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Preface to the Eighth Edition
As a practicing family physician, I place a tremendous amount of importance on my patients’ understanding of their particular ailments. I cannot stress enough how important it is to the healing process for patients to fully comprehend all aspects of their condition. Continuing with the work of H. Winter Griffith, MD, this, the eighth edition, revises and updates the topics from the seventh edition and includes 11 new topics. The majority of the written material is at grade 8 reading level or below (which is the recommended reading level for printed patient information).
With these patient instruction sheets available in your office, you have an opportunity to provide preplanned, printed materials to patients and their families at a time when they are most motivated to learn—when there is a problem and they have come to you for help. These handouts provide quick, inexpensive, and effective supplements to personal contact. If patients perceive the materials distributed to them as an extension of the physician, the instruction sheets become a powerful teaching tool. They help to reinforce oral instructions and refresh the patient’s memory with written material they can take home.
This book contains information on 432 medical disorders. Each medical disorder is on a single page. This makes it a simple process to copy a page on your office copy machine and then hand it out to your patient. There is space on each page for writing additional notes if appropriate.
A companion online website www.expertconsult.com contains the complete contents of this book plus information on 123 additional medical topics. Instruction pages are also available for 23 special diets that will help your patients follow any prescribed dietary changes. All of these patient instruction pages can be easily printed from the website and readily distributed to your patients.
I know that both you and your patients will find this type of patient instruction useful and beneficial.
I wish to thank Ruth M. Schaller, RN, FNP for editing the medical topics and Tracy E. Crane, MS, RD for editing the diet section.

Stephen W. Moore, MD
Table of Contents
Instructions for online access
Copyright
Preface to the Eighth Edition
Topics
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
K
L
M
N
O
P
R
S
T
U
V
W
Z
Diets
A
B
C
D
F
G
I
L
P
S
T
W
INDEX
Topics
A

ABRUPTIO PLACENTAE

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Abruptio placentae is separation of the placenta (also called the afterbirth) from the uterine wall before the baby is born. The placenta carries all nutrients and oxygen to the fetus. A separation can cause complications for the mother and the fetus. With a small separation, there may be no or few symptoms. Larger separations usually cause symptoms.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Bleeding may be external (vaginal bleeding) or it may be concealed (bleeding remains in the uterus).
• Mild pain or discomfort, or there may be severe pain in the lower abdomen or back.
• Decreased fetal movement.
• Hard, tender abdomen. Uterine contractions.

CAUSES
The cause is unknown. Certain risk factors do exist.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• High blood pressure (hypertension).
• Smoking.
• Women over age 35 or younger than 20.
• Women who have had more than 4 or 5 pregnancies.
• A previous pregnancy with placental separation.
• Pregnancy with more than one fetus.
• Excess amniotic fluid (polyhydramnios).
• Chronic disorder (such as diabetes) or renal infection.
• Injury from motor vehicle accident, falls, or abuse.
• Short umbilical cord.
• Abnormal uterus or uterine tumor.
• Premature rupture of the membranes (water breaks before the onset of labor).
• Use of alcohol or drugs of abuse (such as cocaine).

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• There is no sure way to prevent the problem.
• Avoid risk factors such as smoking, alcohol, or cocaine use. Get treatment for high blood pressure.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
When the separation is less severe and with immediate medical care, the outlook for mother and fetus is good.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Premature delivery of the child. This may lead to other complications for the newborn.
• Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) of the fetus.
• Shock or life-threatening bleeding in the mother.
• Blood clotting problems for the mother (disseminated intravascular coagulopathy or DIC).
• Risk of abruptio placentae in a future pregnancy.
• Uncontrolled bleeding after delivery may lead to an emergency hysterectomy.
• Death of child and/or mother.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your obstetric provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms. Medical tests will include blood studies and blood clotting tests. An ultrasound may be done.
• Treatment depends on the severity of the separation, the condition of the fetus, and the duration of the pregnancy. Hospital care is usually needed (except for mild cases) so the mother can be observed for any complications. If the placenta separation is slight, you may be able to return home for bed rest and close observation.
• In the hospital, fluids may be given through a vein (IV). A blood transfusion may be needed.
• Labor may be induced, if the pregnancy is at term or if there are signs of fetal distress.
• Surgery to deliver the unborn child by cesarean section, or vaginal delivery (sometimes).

MEDICATION
A drug to induce labor may be used if immediate delivery is required.

ACTIVITY
Whether you are in the hospital or have been able to return home, follow all medical instructions about any activity limits.

DIET

• A liquid-only diet may be prescribed until it is decided if surgery will be needed.
• If you are resting at home, continue with regular diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You have bleeding (anything more than slight spotting) during pregnancy. This is an emergency!
• You have any other new symptoms.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ABRUPTIO PLACENTAE (Desprendimiento Prematuro de la Placenta) (Abruptio Placentae) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Abruptio placentae es el desprendimiento de la placenta de la pared uterina antes que el bebé nazca. La placenta lleva todos los nutrientes y el oxígeno al feto. Una separación puede causar complicaciones para la madre y el feto. Con una pequeña separación, no habrá ningún síntoma o habrá pocos síntomas. Separaciones más grandes generalmente causan síntomas.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Hemorragia que puede ser externa (hemorragia vaginal) o puede ser encubierta (la hemorragia se queda en el útero).
• Dolor leve o molestia; o puede haber dolor intenso en la parte baja del abdomen o la espalda.
• Movimiento fetal disminuido.
• Abdomen duro e hipersensible.
• Contracciones uterinas.

CAUSAS
La causa es desconocida. Existen ciertos factores de riesgo.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Presión sanguínea elevada (hipertensión).
• Fumar.
• Mujeres mayores de 35 años de edad o menores de 20.
• Mujeres que han tenido más de 4 ó 5 embarazos.
• Un embarazo anterior con separación de la placenta.
• Embarazo con más de un feto.
• Exceso de líquido amniótico (polihidramnios).
• Trastorno crónico (tal como diabetes) o infección renal.
• Lesión por un accidente automovilístico, caída o abuso.
• Cordón umbilical corto.
• Útero anormal o tumor uterino.
• Ruptura prematura de las membranas (el agua se rompe antes del comienzo del parto).
• Consumo de alcohol o abuso de drogas (tales como la cocaína).

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• No existe una forma segura de prevenir el problema.
• Evite los factores de riesgo tales como fumar, tomar alcohol o usar cocaína. Obtenga tratamiento para la presión sanguínea elevada.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Cuando la separación es menos grave y se obtiene tratamiento médico inmediato, el pronóstico para la madre y el feto es bueno.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Parto prematuro del bebé. Esto puede causar otras complicaciones para el recién nacido.
• Restricción del crecimiento intrauterino (RCIU) del feto.
• Shock o hemorragia que pone en peligro la vida de la madre.
• Problemas de coagulación sanguínea para la madre (coagulopatía intravascular diseminada o CID).
• Riesgo de desprendimiento prematuro de la placenta en un embarazo futuro.
• Hemorragia incontrolada después del parto que puede conducir a una histerectomía de emergencia.
• Muerte del niño y / o la madre.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su obstetra le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas. Los exámenes médicos incluyen análisis de sangre y exámenes de coagulación sanguínea. Se le puede hacer un ultrasonido.
• El tratamiento depende del grado de la separación, la condición del feto y la duración del embarazo. Por lo general se necesita hospitalización (excepto para casos leves) de modo que la madre pueda ser observada en caso de cualquier complicación. Si la separación de la placenta es pequeña, puede regresar a la casa para guardar cama y ser cuidadosamente observada.
• En el hospital se pueden administrar fluidos por vía intravenosa (IV). Puede necesitarse una transfusión sanguínea.
• El parto puede ser inducido si el tiempo del embarazo está cumplido o si hay signos de peligro para el feto.
• Cirugía para llevar a cabo el parto del bebé aún no nacido por operación cesárea o parto vaginal (a veces).

MEDICAMENTOS
Se puede usar un medicamento para inducir el parto si es necesario que este se produzca inmediatamente.

ACTIVIDAD
Sea que usted esté en el hospital o que haya podido regresar a su hogar, siga las instrucciones médicas acerca de cualquier límite en sus actividades.

DIETA

• Se le puede recetar una dieta de líquidos solamente hasta que se decida si una operación es necesaria.
• Si está descansando en su hogar, siga una dieta regular.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted tiene una hemorragia (algo que sea más que una simple mancha) durante el embarazo. ¡Esto es una emergencia!
• Usted tiene cualquier otro síntoma nuevo.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ACNE (Acne Vulgaris)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Acne is a common skin condition. It usually affects the skin on the face, chest, and back. Acne has affected almost all people at some point during their lives. In teenagers, it is more common in males than in females. In adults, it is more common in women than men. It can last a few months, or years, or for an entire lifetime.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Mild acne can cause blackheads (open comedones) or whiteheads (closed comedones).
• Pimples (also called zits). These are skin pores that have become pus-filled (clogged and bacteria-infected).
• Severe acne produces many pimples.
• Redness and inflammation around pimples.
• Cysts (larger, firm swellings in the skin).

CAUSES
Glands in the skin make an oily substance called sebum. Sebum usually empties onto the skin surface through a pore (small opening) and causes no problems. With acne, the sebum becomes plugged up in the pore. Sex-hormone changes during the teen years play a role. Acne is not caused by unclean skin or by foods.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Teenagers and young adults.
• Endocrine disorders.
• Use of some drugs, such as cortisone.
• Family history of acne.
• Cosmetics, creams, or moisturizers that contain oil.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Acne cannot be prevented at present. Certain factors can cause a flare up. Avoid them where possible.
• A flare up of acne can be caused by some make-up and lotions, certain foods, sunlight, friction (tight clothes, bicycle helmets), and hormone changes in females before their periods.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• Most cases respond well to treatment. It may take several months. Acne tends to disappear after teen years.
• Despite treatment, acne will sometimes flare up.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Poor self-image, depression, and emotional stress.
• Permanent pitting of the skin.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Wash face with a mild soap once or twice a day and after exercising. Clean skin gently; don’t scrub. An antibacterial soap may help. Rinse soap off completely.
• Shampoo hair daily, especially if it is oily. Don’t let hair hang in the face. Use dandruff-preventing shampoo if needed.
• Avoid oil-based cosmetics. Use thinner, lotion-style, water-based products.
• Don’t squeeze, scratch, pick, or rub the skin. Acne heals better without damage to the skin. Removal of comedones (blackheads) may be done by your health care provider.
• Use nonprescription acne products on your skin.
• See your health care provider if home treatments are not helping or acne is more severe. A skin exam will be done and treatment options will be discussed.
• Treatment will depend on the severity of the acne, any infection or inflammation, and if you are a female who may become pregnant. Treatment may include drugs (both for topical use or taken by mouth).
• Cosmetic surgery (dermabrasion) may be recommended to remove scars after acne heals.
• Removal or drainage of a cyst may be needed.

MEDICATIONS

• Use nonprescription creams or lotions products to treat the acne. These may contain benzyl peroxide, sulfur, salicylic acid, or resorcinol.
• Antibiotics may be prescribed for bacteria infection.
• For more severe cases, topical or oral retinoids (a form of vitamin A), hormone drugs, or stronger acne drugs may be prescribed. Some drugs may increase your sensitivity to sunlight and increase the risk of sunburn.
• Caution—if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy, tell your health care provider before using acne drugs.

ACTIVITY
No limits.

DIET
Foods don’t cause acne, but some foods may make it worse. To find any food problems, stop eating foods that you think may make the acne worse. Then reintroduce them one at a time. If acne flares up 2 to 3 days after a food is eaten, leave that food out of your diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has acne and self-care is not helping.
• Acne recurs despite treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ACNE (Acné Vulgaris) (Acne [Acne Vulgaris]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
El acné es una condición común de la piel. Generalmente afecta la piel de la cara, pecho y espalda. El acné ha afectado a casi toda la gente en algún momento durante sus vidas. En los adolescentes, es más común en los hombres que en las mujeres. En los adultos, es más común en las mujeres que en los hombres. Puede durar unos meses, años o toda la vida.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• El acné superficial puede causar espinillas (comedones abiertos) o puntos blancos (comedones cerrados).
• Pústulas (granos). Son poros de la piel que se han llenado de pus (taponados e infectados con bacterias).
• El acné severo produce muchas espinillas.
• Enrojecimiento e inflamación alrededor de las espinillas.
• Quistes (área de la piel hinchada y firme).

CAUSAS
Hay glándulas en la piel que hacen una sustancia oleosa llamada sebo. El sebo generalmente se vacía en la superficie de la piel a través de un poro (pequeña abertura) y no causa problemas. Con el acné, el sebo se queda taponado en el poro. Las hormonas sexuales durante la adolescencia juegan un papel. El acné no es causado por la falta de limpieza de la piel o por alimentos.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Adolescentes y adultos jóvenes.
• Trastornos endocrinos.
• El uso de algunos medicamentos, como la cortisona.
• Antecedentes familiares de acné.
• Cosméticos, cremas o humectantes que contienen aceite.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• El acné no se puede prevenir en la actualidad. Algunos factores pueden causar un brote. Evítelos siempre que se sea posible.
• Un brote de acné puede ser causado por algunos cosméticos y lociones, ciertos alimentos, la luz solar, la fricción (ropa apretada, cascos de bicicleta), y cambios hormonales en las mujeres antes de sus periodos.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• La mayoría de los casos responden bien al tratamiento. Puede tomar varios meses. El acné tiende a desaparecer después de la adolescencia.
• A pesar del tratamiento, el acné a veces rebrota.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Mala imagen de sí mismo, depresión y estrés emocional.
• Marcas permanentes en la piel.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Lávese la cara con un jabón suave una o dos veces por día y después de hacer ejercicios. Límpiese la piel con suavidad, no la frote. Un jabón antibacteriano puede ayudar. Enjuague el jabón por completo.
• Lávese el pelo diariamente, especialmente si es grasoso. No permita que el pelo le cuelgue sobre la cara. Si es necesario, use un champú que previene la caspa.
• Evite los cosméticos a base de aceite. Use productos más líquidos, a base de agua, al estilo de una loción.
• No se apriete, raspe, escarbe o frote la piel. El acné se cura mejor sin dañar la piel. La extracción de los comedones (puntos negros) puede ser hecho por su proveedor de salud.
• Para su piel, use productos sin prescripción contra el acné.
• Consulte a su proveedor de salud si los tratamientos caseros no le están ayudando o si el acné es más severo. Se le hará un examen de la piel y se discutirán opciones de tratamiento.
• El tratamiento dependerá de la severidad del acné, cualquier infección o inflamación, y si usted es una mujer que puede quedar embarazada. El tratamiento puede incluir medicamentos (tanto tópicos como por vía oral).
• Se le puede recomendar cirugía plástica (dermoabrasión) para sacar las cicatrices después que el acné se cura.
• La extracción o drenaje de un quiste puede ser necesario.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Use cremas o lociones sin prescripción para tratar el acné. Estas pueden contener peróxido de bencilo, azufre, ácido salicílico o resorcinol.
• Se pueden prescribir antibióticos para infecciones bacterianas.
• Para casos más severos, se le pueden prescribir retinoides (una forma de vitamina A) tópicos u orales, medicamentos hormonales o medicamentos más potentes contra el acné. Algunos medicamentos pueden aumentar su sensibilidad a la luz solar y aumentar el riesgo de quemaduras solares.
• Advertencia: si usted está embarazada o planeando un embarazo, infórmele a su proveedor de salud antes de usar medicamentos para el acné.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin límites.

DIETA
Si bien los alimentos no causan el acné, algunos alimentos pueden empeorarlo. Para descubrir cualquier problema alimenticio, deje de comer alimentos que usted piensa pueden empeorar el acné. Luego reintrodúzcalos uno por vez. Si hay un rebrote de acné 2 o 3 días después de consumir el alimento, excluya este alimento de su dieta.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene acné y el autocuidado no está danto resultados.
• El acné reaparece después del tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ACNE ROSACEA

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Acne rosacea is a chronic inflammation of skin of the nose, cheeks, forehead, and chin. Rarely, the neck, chest, ears, or scalp may be affected. Extensive nose and cheek involvement, mostly in men, is called rhinophyma. Acne rosacea tends to start between ages 30 and 50. It is more common in women, but more severe in men.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Symptoms vary from person to person and sometimes in the same person. They may be mild or more severe.
• Flushing or blushing.
• Persistent redness.
• Unsightly red, thickened skin on the nose and cheeks. Small blood vessels are visible on the skin surface.
• Papules (small raised bumps) and pustules (small, white blisters with pus) on the affected skin.
• Burning, stinging, itching, swelling, dryness, or tightness of affected skin.
• Eyes may be red, burning, watery, or irritated.

CAUSES
Unknown. Hereditary and environmental factors appear to play a role.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Fair skinned people.
• Family history of acne rosacea.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Cannot be prevented. Flare-ups may be triggered by hot liquids, spicy foods, alcohol, emotional stress, some skin care products, sun exposure, hot and cold weather, heavy exercise, and hot baths.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
There is no cure. Symptoms can be controlled with treatment and self-care. Acne rosacea is a disease of remissions and frequent flare-ups.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Emotional problems (such as lack of self confidence and low self-esteem).
• Eye complications.
• Scarring may occur, but it is rare.
• Permanent, thickened, bulbous, red skin on the nose (usually in older men).

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider can diagnose the condition by an exam of the affected skin area. Medical tests are usually not needed.
• Treatment will depend on each individual’s needs and severity of the symptoms. Treatment may include drugs and skin treatments.
• Learn what factors cause flare-ups for you and avoid them. Keep a day-to-day diary of your activities and flare-ups to identify your trigger factors.
• Wash your face with a mild soap once or twice a day and after exercising. Clean skin gently; don’t scrub. An antibacterial soap may help. Rinse soap off completely.
• Don’t squeeze, scratch, pick, or rub the skin.
• Reduce stress in your life if possible. Counseling may help if the condition is adding to your stress.
• Surgery (such as laser therapy) may be recommended for visible blood vessels, to reduce redness, or to remove excess tissue from the nose.
• To learn more: National Rosacea Society, 800 S. Northwest Hwy., Suite 200, Barrington, IL 60010; (888) no-blush; website: www.rosacea.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Antibiotics (for the skin or taken by mouth) may be prescribed.
• Topical or oral retinoids (a form of vitamin A) or other drugs may be prescribed depending on the symptoms. Caution—if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy, tell your health care provider before using acne drugs.
• Don’t use nonprescription cortisone creams or lotions without medical advice. They may cause the condition to worsen.

ACTIVITY
Limit time spent in sunny, windy, very hot, or cold weather. Use a sunscreen (SPF 15 or higher).

DIET
Avoid food or drink triggers. Drink plenty of water.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF
You or a family member has symptoms of acne rosacea.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ROSACEA (Acne Rosacea) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La rosácea es una inflamación crónica de la piel de la nariz, las mejillas, la frente y la barbilla. Rara vez puede afectar el cuello, el pecho, las orejas o el cuero cabelludo. Cuando afecta extensivamente a la nariz y las mejillas, lo que ocurre principalmente en los hombres, se llama rinofima. La rosácea tiende a comenzar entre los 30 y 50 años. Es más común en las mujeres, pero es más severa en los hombres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Los síntomas varían de persona a persona y a veces en la misma persona. Pueden ser leves o severos.
• Rubor.
• Enrojecimiento persistente.
• Piel fea, roja y gruesa en la piel de la nariz y las mejillas. Los vasos sanguíneos pequeños son visibles en la superficie de la piel.
• Pápulas (pequeñas protuberancias) y pústulas (pequeñas ampollas blancas con pus) son visibles en la piel afectada.
• Ardor, hormigueo, picazón, hinchazón, resequedad o rigidez de la piel afectada.
• Los ojos pueden arder y estar rojos, lacrimosos e irritados.

CAUSAS
Desconocidas. Aparentemente es causada por factores hereditarios y ambientales.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Personas de piel clara.
• Antecedentes familiares de rosácea.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No puede prevenirse. Los brotes pueden ser provocados por líquidos calientes, comidas picantes, alcohol, estrés emocional, algunos productos de cuidado de la piel, exposición al sol, clima frío o caliente, ejercicio excesivo y baños calientes.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
No hay cura. Los síntomas pueden controlarse con tratamiento y autocuidado. La rosácea es una enfermedad de remisiones y brotes frecuentes.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Problemas emocionales (tales como falta de confianza en sí mismo o autoestima baja).
• Complicaciones de los ojos.
• Formación de cicatrices, aunque esto es poco común.
• Piel de la nariz permanentemente gruesa, bulbosa, enrojecida (generalmente en hombres mayores).

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica puede diagnosticar el trastorno mediante un examen del área afectada de la piel. Generalmente no son necesarios exámenes médicos.
• El tratamiento dependerá de las necesidades de cada persona y de la severidad de los síntomas. El tratamiento puede incluir medicamentos y tratamientos para la piel.
• Aprenda qué factores causan los brotes y evítelos. Mantenga un registro diario de las actividades y los brotes para identificar los factores provocantes.
• Lávese la cara con un jabón suave una o dos veces al día y después de hacer ejercicio. Lávese la piel suavemente; no la frote. Un jabón antibacteriano puede ayudarle. Enjuáguese el jabón completamente.
• No se apriete, rasque o frote la piel.
• Reduzca el estrés en su vida si es posible. La terapia psicológica puede ayudarle si la condición le está aumentando su estrés.
• Se puede recomendar cirugía (tal como terapia de láser) para los vasos sanguíneos visibles, para reducir el enrojecimiento o para remover el exceso de tejido en la nariz.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a National Rosacea Society, 800 S. Northwest Hwy., Suite 200, Barrington, IL 60010; (800) no-blush; website: www.rosacea.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se pueden recetar antibióticos (para la piel o por boca).
• Se pueden recetar retinoides (una forma de vitamina A) orales o tópicos u otros medicamentos dependiendo de los síntomas. Precaución: Si está embarazada o planificando un embarazo, infórmele a su proveedor de atención médica antes de usar los medicamentos para el acné.
• No use cremas o lociones de cortisona de venta sin receta sin consultar al médico. Éstas pueden empeorar la condición.

ACTIVIDAD
Limite el tiempo que pasa en el clima soleado, ventoso, muy caliente o muy frío. Use un bloqueador solar (factor de protección solar, o SPF, de 15 ó más).

DIETA
Evite las bebidas o alimentos causantes de brotes. Tome mucha agua.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI
Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de rosácea.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ADDISON’s DISEASE (Adrenal Insufficiency)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Addison’s disease is a rare disorder that leads to failure of the adrenal glands. The adrenal glands produce hormones (cortisol and aldosterone) that affect almost every body organ and tissue. These hormones help the body respond to stress, maintain blood pressure, help heart and blood vessel function, and are involved in metabolism. Addison’s often affects people ages 30 to 50, but can occur in all age groups. It affects men and women equally.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Symptoms may develop slowly over months or years. Symptoms are caused when levels of hormones produced by the adrenal glands are too low.
• Weakness and fatigue.
• Nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, diarrhea, and appetite and weight loss.
• Low blood pressure causing faintness and dizziness.
• Darkening of the skin. This includes: skin folds, lips and inside mouth or nose, scars, joints such as elbows or knees, creases of the palm, or nipples.
• Craving for salty foods.
• Behavior or mood changes, including irritability or depression.

CAUSES

• Primary adrenal insufficiency is usually caused by an autoimmune disorder. For unknown reasons, the body’s immune system attacks the adrenal glands. Other causes are tuberculosis, AIDS, adrenal gland infection, cancer that has spread to the adrenal glands, or other disorders.
• Secondary adrenal insufficiency occurs when another condition causes the adrenal gland to not produce enough hormones. This is usually due to a pituitary gland problem. In some cases, prolonged or improper use of steroid hormones may be a cause.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Other autoimmune diseases.
• Disorders mentioned in Causes.
• Family history of Addison’s disease.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
No specific preventive measures.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Addison’s disease can be controlled with hormone replacement. A normal lifestyle can be expected.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Adrenal crisis caused by injury or illness. Symptoms may include pain, weakness, low blood pressure, high or low temperature, fainting.
• Increased risk of infections.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms. Medical tests may include blood and urine studies, tests to measure adrenal function, and CT or MRI.
• Treatment involves replacing the hormones the adrenal glands are not making.
• This is a lifelong condition. Learn how to care for yourself. Strict attention to drug schedules is vital.
• Learn about adrenal crisis and its relationship to body stress (e.g., infection, surgery, or injury). A temporary increase in hormone therapy is usually required.
• Advise any doctor or dentist who treats you that you have Addison’s disease.
• If you live or travel where medical care is not readily available, you may be given instructions on giving yourself cortisone injections in case of emergency.
• Wear a medical alert type bracelet or tag stating that you have Addison’s disease and its emergency care.
• Stay up-to-date on vaccines, such as those for influenza and pneumonia.
• Hospital care may be needed for an adrenal crisis.
• To learn more: National Adrenal Diseases Foundation, 505 Northern Blvd., Great Neck, NY 11021; (516) 487-4992 (not toll free); website: www.nadf.us .

MEDICATIONS
Drugs to replace the hormones cortisol and aldosterone will be prescribed as needed. Never stop taking or change your drugs without medical advice.

ACTIVITY
No limits.

DIET
Special diet may be prescribed (e.g., one to maintain proper balance of sodium and potassium).

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of Addison’s disease.
• After diagnosis, infection, injury, or dehydration develops. Drugs may need a dosage change.
• Swollen ankles, weight gain, or new symptoms occur.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ENFERMEDAD DE ADDISON (Addison’s Disease [Adrenal Insufficiency]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La enfermedad de Addison es un trastorno poco común que conduce al fallo de las glándulas suprarrenales. Las glándulas suprarrenales producen hormonas (cortisol y aldosterona) que afectan casi todos los órganos y tejidos en el cuerpo. Estas hormonas ayudan al cuerpo a responder al estrés, mantener la presión sanguínea, ayudan a la función del corazón y los vasos sanguíneos y están involucradas en el metabolismo. La enfermedad de Addison a menudo afecta a las personas entre los 30 y 50 años de edad, pero puede ocurrir en personas de todas las edades. Afecta tanto a hombres como a mujeres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Los síntomas pueden desarrollarse lentamente con el pasar de los meses o años. Los síntomas se presentan cuando los niveles hormonales producidos por las glándulas suprarrenales son demasiado bajos.
• Debilidad y fatiga.
• Náuseas, vómitos, dolor estomacal, diarrea y pérdida de apetito y peso.
• Presión sanguínea baja que causa desmayos y mareos.
• Oscurecimiento de la piel. Este incluye los pliegues de la piel, los labios y el interior de la boca o nariz, las cicatrices, las articulaciones como los codos o rodillas, las rayas en las palmas de las manos, o los pezones.
• Antojo de alimentos salados.
• Cambios drásticos de temperamento, incluyendo irritabilidad o depresión.

CAUSAS

• La insuficiencia suprarrenal primaria es generalmente el resultado de un trastorno autoinmune. Por razones desconocidas, el sistema inmune del cuerpo ataca a las glándulas suprarrenales. Otros detonantes son la tuberculosis, el SIDA, una infección de las glándulas suprarrenales, cáncer que se ha esparcido a las glándulas suprarrenales u otros trastornos.
• La insuficiencia suprarrenal secundaria se presenta cuando otra condición ocasiona que las glándulas suprarrenales no produzcan suficientes hormonas. Generalmente esto se debe a un problema de la glándula pituitaria. En algunos casos, la causa puede ser el uso prolongado o inapropiado de hormonas esteroides.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Otras enfermedades autoinmunes.
• Trastornos mencionados en las causas.
• Antecedentes familiares de la enfermedad de Addison.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No hay medidas preventivas específicas.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
La enfermedad de Addison se puede controlar con reemplazo hormonal. Se puede esperar un estilo de vida normal.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Crisis adrenal causada por lesiones o enfermedades. Los síntomas pueden incluir dolor, debilidad, presión sanguínea baja, temperatura alta o baja o desmayo.
• Aumento de susceptibilidad a las infecciones.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir análisis de sangre y orina, exámenes para medir la función suprarrenal y una tomografía computarizada o imágenes por resonancia magnética.
• El tratamiento involucra el reemplazo de las hormonas que las glándulas suprarrenales no están produciendo.
• Este trastorno dura toda la vida. Aprenda a cuidarse. Es vital que siga estrictamente el horario de sus medicamentos.
• Aprenda sobre la crisis adrenal y su relación con el estrés corporal (p. ej., infección, cirugía o lesión). Generalmente se requiere el aumento temporal de terapia hormonal.
• Avísele al médico o dentista que lo trate que padece de la enfermedad de Addison.
• Si vive o viaja a un sitio en donde no se dispone de atención médica inmediata, tendrá que aprender a administrarse por sí mismo las inyecciones de cortisol en casos de urgencia.
• Use un brazalete o medallón de alerta médica indicando que usted tiene la enfermedad de Addison y detalles del cuidado de emergencia.
• Mantenga las vacunas al día, incluyendo las de la influenza y neumonía.
• Se puede necesitar hospitalización si tiene una crisis adrenal.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: National Adrenal Diseases Foundation, 505 Northern Blvd., Great Neck, NY 11021, (516) 487-4992 (no es libre de cargos); sitio web: www.nadf.us .

MEDICAMENTOS
Se recetarán, según los necesite, medicamentos para reemplazar las hormonas cortisol y aldosterona. Nunca pare de tomar o cambie los medicamentos sin recomendación médica.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin restricciones.

DIETA
Se puede recetar una dieta especial (por ejemplo, mantener un balance adecuado de sodio y potasio).

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de la familia tiene síntomas de la enfermedad de Addison.
• Después del diagnóstico ocurre una infección, lesión o deshidratación. Los medicamentos pueden necesitar un cambio de dosis.
• Tiene los tobillos hinchados, aumenta de peso u ocurren síntomas nuevos.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ADJUSTMENT DISORDERS

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
An adjustment disorder occurs when a person’s response to a stressful life event (sometimes called a stressor) is out of proportion to what would be a normal reaction. The person is unable to adjust and this causes problems in both social and work (or school) situations or other functions of daily living.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Symptoms or behavior changes occur within three months of onset of the stressor. They usually last no more than six months after the end of the stressor.
• Symptoms vary from person to person. They are often more severe in teens and the elderly.
• Changes in sleeping and eating patterns.
• Withdrawal (avoids social activities and friends).
• Fearful about the future.
• Low self-esteem and feeling emotionally numb.
• Feeling tense, anxious, and depressed.
• Feelings of fear, rage, guilt, or shame.
• Denial of the stressful event (acting as if it never occurred).

CAUSES
A disruption in the normal process of adapting to a stressful event. Everyone reacts differently to an event. It depends on its importance and the intensity of the event. It depends on the person’s personality, temperament, age, and well-being.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• The degree of undesired change a stressor causes.
• Whether the stressor was sudden or expected.
• The importance of the stressor in the person’s life.
• Lack of support systems (e.g., family, friends, religious, cultural, and social ties).
• How well a person responds to stressful life events.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
No specific preventive measures known.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
It usually clears up on its own after the person adapts to the changed situation, or the stressor ends. Treatment can help in other cases. These disorders are common and are often only temporary.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Difficulty maintaining relationships or jobs.
• Lingering problems in teenagers.
• Self-treatment using alcohol or drugs to overcome un-desired symptoms and feelings.
• Chronic anxiety and depression.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms and the changes that are going on in your life. It is important to identify the stressor that has led to the symptoms. It can be anything that is important to you. The stressor may be only one event or a string of events. It may seem minor to some, but is important to you.
• Treatment may include self-care, counseling, and in some cases, drug therapy. This depends on severity of symptoms and impact on your lifestyle.
• Learn to cope with stress. Keeping a journal about your stressors and feelings, talking to a friend, or joining a support group may help. Take good care of your physical health (diet, exercise, and sleep).
• Counseling or psychotherapy may be recommended. Several therapy methods are effective and are often needed for a brief period. Family therapy (including marital counseling) may be recommended for some.

MEDICATION
Since adjustment disorders are usually of short duration, drugs are normally not needed. A drug may be prescribed short term for insomnia or for other specific symptoms, depending on their severity.

ACTIVITY
No limits. A routine physical exercise program is recommended. Physical activity helps reduce anxiety and stress.

DIET
Eat a well-balanced diet to maintain good health.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of an adjustment disorder.
• Symptoms continue to worsen after treatment begins.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

TRASTORNOS DE ADAPTACION (Adjustment Disorders) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Un trastorno de ajuste ocurre cuando la respuesta de una persona a un evento estresante (a veces llamado un factor estresante) está fuera de proporción con lo que sería una reacción normal. La persona es incapaz de adaptarse y esto causa problemas tanto en las situaciones sociales y del trabajo (o escuela) u otras funciones del diario vivir.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Los síntomas o cambios de comportamiento ocurren dentro de tres meses del comienzo del factor estresante. Generalmente no duran más de seis meses después del factor estresante.
• Los síntomas varían de persona a persona. Frecuentemente son más acentuados en los adolescentes y en los ancianos.
• Cambios en los patrones alimenticios y de dormir.
• Retraimiento social (evita las actividades sociales y los amigos).
• Temeroso del futuro.
• Autoestima baja y sentirse adormecido emocionalmente.
• Sentirse tenso, ansioso y deprimido.
• Sentimientos de temor, furia, culpabilidad o vergüenza.
• Negación del evento estresante (actuar como si no hubiese ocurrido).

CAUSAS
Interrupción de los procesos normales de adaptación a un evento estresante. Cada persona reacciona diferente a un evento, dependiendo de la importancia e intensidad del evento. También depende de la personalidad, temperamento, edad y bienestar de la persona.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• El grado de cambio indeseado que causa el factor estresante.
• Si el factor estresante fue repentino o era esperado.
• La importancia del factor estresante en la vida de la persona.
• Falta de sistemas de apoyo (por ejemplo, familia, amigos, lazos religiosos, culturales y sociales).
• Cuán bien la persona responde a los eventos estresantes de la vida.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No se conocen medidas preventivas.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Generalmente desaparece por cuenta propia cuando la persona se adapta a la situación cambiante o el factor estresante termina. En otros casos el tratamiento puede ser útil. Estos trastornos son comunes y sólo son temporales.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Dificultad en mantener relaciones o trabajos.
• Problemas prolongados en los adolescentes.
• Auto-tratamiento usando alcohol o drogas para enfrentar los síntomas y sentimientos indeseados.
• Ansiedad o depresión crónica.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas y de los cambios que están ocurriendo en su vida. Es importante identificar los factores estresantes que resultaron en los síntomas. Puede ser cualquier cosa que es importante para usted. El factor estresante puede ser un evento o una serie de eventos. Puede parecer menor para algunos, pero es importante para usted.
• El tratamiento puede incluir autocuidado, terapia psicológica y en algunos casos, terapia de medicamentos. Esto depende de la intensidad de los síntomas y el impacto en su estilo de vida.
• Aprenda a manejar el estrés. El mantener un diario de los factores estresantes y sus sentimientos, hablar con un amigo o unirse a un grupo de apoyo pueden ayudarle. Tome buen cuidado de su salud física (dieta, ejercicio, sueño).
• Puede recomendarse terapia psicológica o psicoterapia. Varios métodos de terapia son efectivos y frecuentemente son necesarios por un periodo corto. La terapia familiar (incluyendo la terapia matrimonial) puede recomendarse para algunos.

MEDICAMENTOS
Como los trastornos de adaptación generalmente son de corta duración, los medicamentos generalmente no son necesarios. Se puede recetar un medicamento a corto plazo para el insomnio o para otros síntomas, dependiendo de su gravedad.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin límites. Se recomienda un programa de ejercicio físico de rutina. La actividad física ayuda a reducir la ansiedad y el estrés.

DIETA
Coma una dieta balanceada para mantener la buena salud.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia presenta síntomas de un trastorno de adaptación.
• Los síntomas continúan o empeoran después del tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ALCOHOLISM

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION

• Alcoholism is a chronic, progressive disease that involves dependence on, or an addiction to, alcohol.
– Craving. A strong need or urge to drink.
– Loss of control. Not being able to stop drinking once drinking has begun.
– Physical dependence. Withdrawal symptoms, such as upset stomach, sweating, shakiness, and anxiety after stopping drinking.
– Tolerance. The need to drink greater amounts of alcohol to get “high.”

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Need for alcohol at the start of the day.
• Use of alcohol to relieve stress or forget problems.
• Insomnia and nightmares.
• Vision, hearing, perception, and alertness problems.
• Monday-morning hangovers and loss of work days.
• Makes promises to limit or stop drinking, but fails.
• Lies about drinking. Sneaks drinks at work or school.
• Anger and guilt when asked about drinking.
• Blackouts, personality and mood changes, confusion, memory loss, depression, anxiety, and fatigue.
• Tremors, violent shakes, hallucinations, or convulsions when there is no alcohol in the body.
• Poor nutrition and poor hygiene. Bad breath.
• Lack of sexual interest and loss of potency.
• Problems with money, work, or family.

CAUSES
Not fully understood. It appears to be a combination of genetic, environmental, and personality factors.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Family history of alcoholism.
• Males more than females.
• Personal history of other substance abuse.
• A person’s genetic makeup may increase risk.
• Persons who begin drinking alcohol before age 16.
• Mental health problems. These include anxiety, depression, aggressive or impulsive behaviors, schizophrenia, low self-esteem, and others.
• Peer pressure and social acceptance of alcohol use.
• Ease of getting alcohol.
• Stress (e.g., over relationships or unemployment).

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Avoid or limit alcohol. Women have no more than one drink a day and men no more than two drinks a day.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
It is an illness that can be treated. Treatment has varying success rates. Some people are able to quit on their own. Relapse is somewhat common, but many people have a full recovery.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Damage to the brain, liver, heart, and other organs.
• Fetal alcohol syndrome (children of alcoholic mothers).
• Without treatment, alcoholism can be fatal.
• Suicide or fatal motor vehicle accidents.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask about your symptoms. You may be asked verbal questions or to fill out a written form about your alcohol use. These can help identify problem drinking. Medical tests may include blood and urine studies.
• Treatment depends on the severity of the alcohol problem, other illnesses (physical, emotional, or mental), and how motivated you are to change. Treatment usually involves withdrawal of alcohol and detoxification, and long-term support to help you remain sober.
• Specific treatment steps include counseling (may be all that is needed), drugs (in some cases), inpatient care at a hospital or treatment center, or referral to a health care provider who treats addiction problems.
• To learn more: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism, website: www.niaaa.nih.gov or consider support groups (e.g., Alcoholics Anonymous).

MEDICATIONS

• Your health care provider may prescribe:
– Drugs that reduce the craving for alcohol.
– Drugs that cause unpleasant physical symptoms when alcohol is consumed.
– Drugs that reduce the pleasure of alcohol.
– Drugs for withdrawal symptoms, as needed.

ACTIVITY
Exercise daily. It helps in maintaining your physical and mental well-being.

DIET
Eat a normal, well-balanced diet. Vitamin supplements may be recommended.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of alcoholism.
• You have a relapse after recovery.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ALCOHOLISMO (Alcoholism) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION

• El alcoholismo es una enfermedad crónica y progresiva que involucra la dependencia del, o adicción al, alcohol. La misma involvera:
– Deseo ardiente. Una necesidad o urgencia fuerte de beber
– Pérdida del control. La persona afectada no es capaz de parar de beber una vez que ha comenzado a beber
– Dependencia física. Síntomas de abstinencia, tales como molestias estomacales, sudores, temblores y ansiedad, después de dejar de beber
– Tolerancia. Necesidad de beber cantidades mayores de alcohol para sentirse "borracho"

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Necesidad de beber alcohol al comenzar el día.
• Usar el alcohol para aliviar el estrés u olvidar los problemas.
• Insomnio y pesadillas.
• Problemas con la visión, audición, entendimiento y el estar alerta.
• Efectos habituales de la borrachera, o resacas, los lunes en la mañana y frecuentes ausencias al trabajo.
• Promesas de limitar o dejar la bebida, pero fracaso en su cumplimiento.
• Mentiras acerca de la bebida. Llevar bebidas a escondidas al trabajo o escuela.
• Ira y culpa cuando se le pregunta acerca de la bebida.
• Pérdida del conocimiento, cambios de temperamento y personalidad, confusión, pérdida de la memoria, depresión, ansiedad y fatiga.
• Pequeños temblores, sacudidas violentas, alucinaciones o convulsiones cuando no hay alcohol en el cuerpo.
• Malas nutrición e higiene. Mal aliento.
• Falta de deseo sexual y pérdida de la potencia sexual.
• Problemas económicos, en el trabajo y con la familia.

CAUSAS
No se comprende completamente. Parece ser una combinación de problemas genéticos, ambientales y de personalidad.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Antecedentes familiares de alcoholismo.
• Los hombres más que las mujeres.
• Antecedentes personales de abuso de otras sustancias.
• La constitución genética de la persona puede aumentar el riesgo.
• Personas que empiezan a beber alcohol antes de los 16 años.
• Problemas de salud mental. Estos incluyen ansiedad, depresión, comportamiento agresivo o impulsivo, esquizofrenia, baja autoestima y otros.
• Presión de grupos sociales (o grupo de pares, los que la persona toma como referente) y aceptación social del consumo de alcohol.
• Facilidad para obtener alcohol.
• Estrés (p. ej., con respecto a relaciones afectivas o desempleo).

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
Evite o limite el alcohol. Las mujeres no deben tomar más de un trago al día y los hombres no más de dos tragos al día.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Esta es una enfermedad que sí puede ser tratada. El tratamiento tiene índices de éxitos variables. Algunas personas son capaces de dejar de beber por sí mismas. Las recaídas son comunes, pero muchas personas tienen una recuperación completa.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Daño al cerebro, hígado, corazón y otros órganos.
• Síndrome alcohólico fetal (niños de madres alcohólicas).
• Sin tratamiento, el alcoholismo puede ser fatal.
• Suicidio o accidentes fatales en vehículos automovilísticos.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas. Le pueden preguntar verbalmente o hacerle llenar un formulario acerca del uso del alcohol. Esto puede ayudar a identificar los problemas de bebida. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir análisis de sangre y orina.
• El tratamiento depende de la gravedad del problema de alcohol, otras enfermedades (físicas, emocionales o mentales) y cuán motivado está a cambiar. El tratamiento generalmente involucra dejar de beber y desintoxicarse, junto con apoyo a largo plazo para ayudarlo a mantenerse sobrio.
• Las medidas específicas de tratamiento incluyen terapia psicológica (puede que sea todo lo que se necesite), medicamentos (en algunos casos), hospitalización en un hospital o centro de tratamiento o una recomendación acerca de un proveedor de atención médica que trate problemas de adicción.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism, sitio web: www.niaaa nih.gov o considere uno de los grupos de apoyo existentes (p. ej., Alcohólicos Anónimos).

MEDICAMENTOS

• El proveedor de atención médica puede recetarle:
– Medicamentos para reducir el deseo ardiente por el alcohol
– Medicamentos que causan síntomas físicos desagradables cuando se consume alcohol
– Medicamentos que reducen el placer del alcohol
– Medicamentos para los síntomas de abstinencia, si los necesita

ACTIVIDAD
Haga ejercicio todos los días. Esto ayuda a mantener el bienestar físico y mental.

DIETA
Ingiera una dieta normal y bien equilibrada. Se pueden recomendar suplementos vitamínicos.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de alcoholismo.
• Tiene una recaída después de la recuperación.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ALOPECIA AREATA

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Alopecia areata is sudden hair loss in circular patches on the scalp. The hair loss does not occur with other visible evidence of scalp disease. It can involve hair on the scalp, eyebrows, eyelashes, genital area, or sometimes underarms. Alopecia can occur at any age, from birth to older adults. Many cases start before age 20.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Sudden hair loss in sharply defined circular patches. In rare cases, body hair loss may be total (alopecia universalis).
• Pain and itching may occur in some cases.
• Nails may be affected, such as pitting, in more severe cases.

CAUSES
Unknown. It is thought to be one of a group of autoimmune disorders. In these disorders, the immune system by mistake attacks the body itself. Heredity and emotional stress or psychiatric disorders may play a role.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Family history of alopecia areata.
• Stressful life event preceding the hair loss may be a factor.
• Certain medical disorders may occur along with alopecia, but do not appear to be a cause or risk factor.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Cannot be prevented at present.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
The outcome varies depending on the amount of hair loss. There is no permanent cure and the disorder may come and go. Most people have only a few areas of alopecia and regrowth occurs in about a year.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Loss of all hair.
• Slow or incomplete regrowth.
• Treatment may not be effective in extensive hair loss.
• Disorder frequently recurs.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam of the affected scalp area. Medical tests are usually not needed unless some underlying disorder is suspected.
• In a simple, self-limited case where the alopecia is not noticeable, no treatment may be needed. In other cases, drugs may be used for treatment depending on amount of hair loss and age of patient. No one treatment helps everyone with the disorder.
• A change in hair-style may cover the affected area.
• Consider wearing a hairpiece or wig until the hair grows in again.
• For loss of eyebrow hair, dermatography may help. Small dots of colored pigment are injected into eyebrow area.
• Continue to bathe and shampoo as usual. The disorder is not contagious. Don’t tug on normal hair close to areas of hair loss.
• Seek counseling if coping with the hair loss is causing emotional problems. Support groups are also available.
• To learn more: National Alopecia Areata Foundation, 14 Mitchell Blvd., San Rafael, CA 94903; (415) 472-3780 (not toll free); website: www.naaf.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Topical steroids or topical anthralin may be prescribed. Follow instructions carefully.
• Topical minoxidil (a drug used for hair growth) may help. Its effectiveness is highly variable.
• In some cases, you may have injections of steroids into affected areas.
• Oral cortisone drugs may be recommended.
• Topical immunotherapy may be recommended. This involves producing a skin reaction to help hair growth.
• Photochemotherapy with PUVA may be recommended. It combines the use of a drug that sensitizes the skin along with a controlled dose of ultraviolet light.

ACTIVITY
No limits.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of alopecia areata.
• The following occurs during treatment:
– Hair loss increases or hair loss doesn’t improve.
– Areas show signs of infection (redness, swelling, tenderness, warmth) after injection treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ALOPECIA AREATA (Alopecia Areata) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La alopecia areata es la pérdida repentina del cabello en áreas circulares en el cuero cabelludo. La pérdida de pelo no ocurre con ninguna otra evidencia visible de enfermedad en el cuero cabelludo. Puede afectar el cabello del cuero cabelludo, cejas, pestañas, área genital o (a veces) axilas. La alopecia puede ocurrir a cualquier edad, desde el nacimiento hasta adultos mayores. Muchos casos comienzan antes de los 20 años de edad.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Pérdida repentina del cabello en zonas circulares bien definidas. En casos raros, la pérdida del pelo puede ser total, incluyendo la vellosidad corporal, cejas y pestañas (alopecia universal).
• En algunos casos puede haber dolor y picor.
• Las uñas pueden verse afectadas, tal como la formación de hoyos en los casos más severos.

CAUSAS
Desconocidas. Se cree que es un trastorno autoinmune. En estos trastornos, el sistema inmunológico ataca al propio cuerpo por equivocación. La herencia y el estrés emocional o trastornos psiquiátricos podrían jugar un papel.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Antecedentes familiares de alopecia areata.
• Un evento que causa estrés antes de la pérdida del cabello podría ser un factor.
• Ciertos trastornos médicos pueden ocurrir durante la alopecia, pero no parecen ser causas ni factores de riesgo.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
Actualmente no puede prevenirse.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
El pronóstico varía dependiendo de la cantidad de cabello perdido. No hay una cura permanente y el trastorno puede aparecer y desaparecer. La mayoría de las personas tienen sólo unas cuantas áreas de alopecia y el cabello comienza a crecer nuevamente en aproximadamente un año.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Pérdida de todo el cabello.
• Crecimiento lento o incompleto del nuevo cabello.
• El tratamiento puede no ser efectivo contra la pérdida extensiva del cabello.
• Frecuentemente, el trastorno reaparece.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico del área del cuero cabelludo afectada. Los exámenes médicos generalmente no son necesarios a menos que se sospeche algún trastorno subyacente.
• En un caso simple y limitado en el cual la alopecia no es perceptible, puede no necesitarse tratamiento. En otros casos, se pueden usar medicamentos para el tratamiento dependiendo de la cantidad de cabello perdido y la edad del paciente. No hay un tratamiento único que ayude a todos con el trastorno.
• Un cambio en el peinado podría cubrir el área afectada.
• Considere usar un tupé o una peluca hasta que el cabello le crezca de nuevo.
• La dermatografía podría ayudar con la pérdida del pelo de las cejas. En este tratamiento se inyectan pequeños puntos de pigmento con color en el área de las cejas.
• Continúe bañándose y lavándose el cabello en forma normal. El trastorno no es contagioso. No se tire el cabello que está cerca de las áreas afectadas.
• Busque terapia psicológica si la pérdida del cabello le está causando problemas emocionales. También hay grupos de apoyo disponibles.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: National Alopecia Areata Foundation, 14 Mitchell Blvd., San Rafael, CA 94903; (415) 472-3780 (no es libre de cargo); sitio web: www.naaf.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Pueden recetarse esteroides tópicos o antralina tópica. Siga las instrucciones cuidadosamente.
• Puede ayudarle el minoxidil tópico (un medicamento usado para el crecimiento del cabello). Su efectividad es altamente variable.
• En algunos casos, puede recibir inyecciones de esteroides en las áreas afectadas.
• Se pueden recomendar medicamentos de cortisona orales.
• Se puede recomendar inmunoterapia tópica. Esta consiste en producir una reacción en la piel para ayudar al crecimiento del cabello.
• Se puede recomendar fotoquimioterapia con PUVA. Esta consiste de usar un medicamento que sensibiliza la piel junto con una dosis controlada de luz ultravioleta.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin límites.

DIETA
Ninguna dieta en especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia presenta síntomas de alopecia areata.
• Lo siguiente ocurre durante el tratamiento:
– La pérdida del cabello aumenta o no mejora.
– Las áreas presentan signos de infección (enrojecimiento, hinchazón, hipersensibilidad, calor) después del tratamiento con inyección.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ALTITUDE ILLNESS (Mountain Sickness)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION

• Altitude illness results from travel to higher than normal altitudes. It can affect anyone, no matter what their age or how healthy they are. Types include
– Acute mountain sickness (AMS); the most common.
– High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE). Both are less common.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Mild symptoms may begin when you climb or travel above 5,000 feet.
– Headache, feeling lightheaded and weak.
– Nausea or vomiting.
– Sleeping problems.
• As you go higher, more severe symptoms may occur.
– Cough and trouble with breathing.
– Unsteady walk.
– Confusion; hallucinations (seeing what is not there).
– Coma (person cannot be aroused).

CAUSES
There is reduced air pressure and a lower concentration of oxygen at high altitude. This means that there is less oxygen available for a person to breathe in. How this shortage of oxygen actually affects the body and leads to altitude sickness is still not fully understood.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Some people are more susceptible. It is unclear why certain people get sick while others do not. At 14,000 feet, most people will have at least mild symptoms.
• People with severe heart or lung disease or people with sickle-cell anemia.
• Going too high too quickly.
• Personal history of altitude illness.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Educate yourself before your trip. Find out how high the altitude will be. Learn about symptoms of altitude illness. Find out if medical help will be handy.
• Ask your health care provider for advice about high altitude travel for children, for pregnant women, and for people with chronic health problems. The travel may be considered safe, but find out for sure.
• While on the trip, slowly adjust to the change in altitude. Rest for a day or two at each 1,000 to 2,000 feet. Take it easy, don’t overdo, drink fluids, but not alcohol.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Most cases are mild and do not need medical treatment. Recovery takes only one to a few days.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
Serious outcomes, including death, are rare. They are only likely to occur if the person is unable to go down to a lower level, or is not able to get medical help.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• If mild symptoms occur, rest for a day or two at that altitude. You may want to go back down (to descend) to a lower altitude. Do not travel higher (to ascend) until the symptoms resolve or get much better.
• If symptoms do not improve or they get worse, seek medical help. Your health care provider will ask about your symptoms, may do a physical exam, and have medical tests performed to check on your heart, lungs, and other body systems.
• Treatment steps will depend on your symptoms. You may be advised to go to a lower altitude. This is the most important and only sure treatment step.
• Symptoms should improve in a few days if you rest, drink plenty of fluids, don’t drink alcohol, and avoid heavy exercise.
• For more severe symptoms, you will need to go to a lower altitude immediately. You may need pure oxygen breathed in through a mask for a period of time. A hospital stay may be necessary until you recover.

MEDICATIONS

• Ask your health care provider’s advice before you travel about drugs that can help prevent or treat symptoms. Drugs do have side effects, so be cautious.
• For mild symptoms, such as headache, you may use pain relievers, such as ibuprofen or naproxen.
• In severe cases, drugs will be given to treat complications and help speed recovery.

ACTIVITY
Resume daily activities gradually upon returning to your normal altitude.

DIET
If you become ill, increase fluid intake, avoid alcohol, and eat small meals.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF
You or a family member has altitude illness symptoms, or wants to discuss symptoms that occurred on a trip.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ENFERMEDAD DE ALTURA (Mal de Montaña, Soroche o Apunamiento) (Altitude Illness [Mountain Sickness]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION

• La enfermedad de altura ocurre al viajar a alturas más altas de lo normal. Puede afectar a cualquier persona independientemente de la edad o del estado de salud. Los tipos incluyen:
– Enfermedad aguda de montaña; la más común.
– Edema pulmonar de alta altura y edema cerebral de alta altura. Éstos son menos comunes.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Los síntomas leves pueden comenzar al subir o viajar a una altura de más de 5,000 pies (sobre el nivel del mar)
– Dolor de cabeza, sentirse mareado y débil.
– Náusea o vómito.
– Problemas para dormir.
• A medida que sube a mayores alturas, pueden aparecer síntomas más severos
– Tos y problemas para respirar.
– Caminar indeciso.
– Confusión; alucinaciones (ver cosas que no están allí).
– Coma (estado severo de pérdida de consciencia, del cual la persona no se puede despertar).

CAUSAS
En las alturas elevadas, la presión del aire es reducida y hay una menor concentración de oxígeno. Esto quiere decir que hay menos oxígeno disponible para que una persona pueda respirar. Todavía no se entiende del todo cómo la falta de oxígeno afecta en realidad al cuerpo y lo lleva a sufrir la enfermedad de altura.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Algunas personas son más susceptibles. No está claro el por qué ciertas personas se enferman mientras otras no. A 14,000 pies de altura, la mayoría de las personas sufrirán al menos síntomas leves.
• Personas con enfermedad cardiaca o pulmonar severa, o personas con anemia de células falciformes.
• Subir muy alto muy rápido.
• Antecedentes personales de la enfermedad de altura.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Infórmese de viajar. Conozca cuál será la altura. Aprenda sobre los síntomas de la enfermedad de altura. Averigüe si habrá ayuda médica disponible.
• Pregúntele al proveedor de atención médica acerca de los viajes a altas alturas para niños, mujeres embarazadas y personas con problemas crónicos de salud. Puede que el viaje sea considerado sin riesgo, pero asegúrese.
• Mientras está de viaje, ajústese lentamente al cambio de altura. Descanse por uno o dos días por cada aumento de 1,000 o 2,000 pies en la altura. Tómelo con calma, no se sobreexceda; tome líquidos, pero no tome alcohol.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
La mayoría de los casos son leves y no necesitan tratamiento médico. La recuperación toma de uno a varios días.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Consecuencias serias, incluyendo la muerte, son muy raras. Sólo son probables si la persona no puede bajar a una altura menor o no puede obtener ayuda médica.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Si sufre los síntomas leves, descanse por uno o dos días a esta altura. Puede bajar (descender) a una altura menor. No viaje a una mayor altura (ascender) hasta que los síntomas pasen o mejoren.
• Si los síntomas no mejoran o empeoran, busque ayuda médica. El proveedor de atención médica preguntará acerca de los síntomas, puede hacer un examen físico y puede hacer exámenes médicos para chequear sus sistemas pulmonares y cardiacos entre otros.
• Las medidas del tratamiento dependerán de los síntomas. Se le puede aconsejar que baje a una altura menor. Este es el paso más importante y el único seguro.
• Los síntomas deben mejorar dentro de unos días si descansa, toma suficientes líquidos, no toma alcohol y evita el ejercicio extremo.
• Para los síntomas más severos necesitará bajar a una altura menor inmediatamente. Puede necesitar oxígeno puro, administrado a través de una máscara, por un periodo de tiempo. La hospitalización puede ser necesaria hasta que se recupere.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Pídale consejos a su proveedor de atención médica antes de viajar acerca de los medicamentos que pueden prevenir o tratar los síntomas. Los medicamentos tienen efectos secundarios, así que sea cuidadoso.
• Para los síntomas leves, tales como dolor de cabeza, puede usar analgésicos, tales como ibuprofeno o naproxeno.
• En casos severos, se le darán medicamentos para tratar las complicaciones y acelerar la recuperación.

ACTIVIDAD
Reanude las actividades diarias gradualmente al regresar a la altura normal.

DIETA
Si se enferma, aumente el consumo de líquidos, evite el alcohol y coma comidas pequeñas.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI
Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de enfermedad de altura o quiere discutir los síntomas que ocurrieron en un viaje.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE (Presenile Dementia)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a brain disorder that involves gradual mental deterioration. The more gradual form, with slow development of symptoms, begins around ages 65 to 70. A rapidly progressive form begins in adults around ages 36 to 45.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Early stages:
– Forgetful of recent events.
– Increasing difficulty doing mental tasks, such as usual work, balancing a checkbook, or maintaining a household.
– Personality or mood changes, such as poor impulse control, poor judgment, fearful, depression, confusion.
• Later stages:
– Difficulty doing simple tasks, such as choosing clothing, solving problems.
– Failure to recognize familiar persons.
– Lack of interest in personal hygiene or appearance.
– Difficulty feeding self.
– Belligerence and denial that anything is wrong.
– Loss of usual sexual inhibitions.
– Wandering away.
– Anxiety and insomnia.
• Advanced stages:
– Complete loss of memory, speech, and muscle function. This includes bladder and bowel control.

CAUSES
Damage to or loss of brain cells for unknown reasons.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Family history of Alzheimer’s disease.
• Other genetic factors.
• Aging.
• Research shows that factors related to blood circulation may be involved (such as those causing heart disease or stroke, especially smoking cigarettes).

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
No specific preventive measures.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
There is no cure. Treatment helps slow the progress and helps relieve the symptoms. Patients may progress from onset of symptoms to end-stage disease in 8 to 10 years. This varies from person to person. Those with end-stage disease often need the care provided in an assisted living facility that handles Alzheimer’s patients.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Infections. They are a major cause of death in Alzheimer’s patients.
• Final stages of the disease will lead to death.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about the symptoms. There is no specific test to diagnose Alzheimer’s. Medical tests may include cognitive tests (answering questions). Blood, urine, and spinal fluid studies, heart studies, CT, MRI, PET scans, or others help rule out other disorders. Certain genetic tests help to identify inherited forms of Alzheimer’s.
• A diagnosis of Alzheimer’s is overwhelming, both for the patient and the family. Educate yourselves as much as possible about what to expect and how to plan for it. With early diagnosis, the patient can help take part in making decisions for the future.
• Treatment will depend on the stage of the disease. Different drugs are available that can help slow the progress of the disease.
• Drugs to treat the behavior symptoms can help make a patient more comfortable and make their care easier.
• Caring for a family member with Alzheimer’s is a difficult task. Caregivers need to take care of themselves. Joining a support group for caregivers may be helpful.
• To learn more: Alzheimer’s Association, 225 N. Michigan Ave., Flr. 17, Chicago, IL 60601; (800) 272-3900; website: www.alz.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Drugs that slow the progress of the disease for a limited time are usually prescribed.
• Drugs as needed to help control behavior symptoms (insomnia, agitation, wandering, depression, anxiety, and others) will be prescribed.

ACTIVITY
With time, all patient activity will require supervision.

DIET
Regular diet. Feeding help will eventually be needed.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease.
• Caregivers have any questions or concerns about the patient, the symptoms, or the treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ENFERMEDAD DE ALZHEIMER (Demencia Presenil) (Alzheimer’s Disease [Presenile Dementia]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La enfermedad de Alzheimer (AD, por sus siglas en inglés) es un trastorno del cerebro caracterizado por el deterioro mental gradual. La forma más gradual, con desarrollo lento de los síntomas, comienza alrededor de los 65 a 70 años. Una forma de desarrollo rápido comienza en los adultos de alrededor de 36 a 45 años.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Etapas iniciales:
– Olvido de hechos recientes.
– Dificultad cada vez mayor para llevar a cabo tareas mentales, tales como el trabajo normal, llevar las cuentas en la chequera o mantener la organización del hogar.
– Cambios de personalidad o en el estado de ánimo, tales como falta de control de los impulsos, falta de discernimiento, sentirse temeroso, estar deprimido, estar confuso.
• Etapas posteriores:
– Dificultad para hacer tareas simples tales como escoger la ropa, resolver problemas.
– Incapacidad para reconocer a personas conocidas.
– Desinterés en la higiene y en la apariencia personal.
– Dificultad para comer por su cuenta.
– Agresividad y rechazo a aceptar que existe un problema.
– Pérdida de las inhibiciones sexuales.
– Caminar sin rumbo fijo.
– Ansiedad e insomnio.
• Etapas avanzadas:
– Pérdida total de la memoria, del habla y de la función muscular. Esto incluye el control de la vejiga y de la defecación.

CAUSAS
Daño o pérdida de las células del cerebro por causas desconocidas.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Antecedentes familiares de la enfermedad de Alzheimer.
• Otros factores genéticos.
• Envejecimiento.
• Las investigaciones han demostrado que factores relacionados a la circulación sanguínea pueden estar involucrados (tales como los que causan enfermedades del corazón o apoplejía, especialmente el fumar cigarrillos).

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No hay medidas preventivas específicas.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
En la actualidad se considera incurable. El tratamiento ayuda a retrasar el progreso y a aliviar los síntomas. Los pacientes pueden progresar de los síntomas iniciales a la etapa avanzada de la enfermedad en 8 a 10 años. Esto varía de persona a persona. Las personas en la etapa avanzada de la enfermedad frecuentemente necesitan del cuidado provisto en un centro para convalecientes que cuide personas con Alzheimer.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Infecciones. Esta es la causa mayor de muerte en los pacientes de Alzheimer.
• Las etapas finales de la enfermedad provocan la muerte.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas. No hay un examen específico para diagnosticar la enfermedad de Alzheimer. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir exámenes cognitivos (contestar preguntas), de sangre, de orina y estudios del fluido espinal, estudios del corazón, tomografía computarizada, imágenes por resonancia magnética y tomografía por emisión de positrones. Estos estudios ayudan a descartar otros trastornos. Ciertos exámenes genéticos ayudan a identificar las formas hereditarias de la enfermedad de Alzheimer.
• El diagnóstico de la enfermedad de Alzheimer es abrumador tanto para el paciente como para la familia. Infórmense tanto como puedan acerca de qué esperar y cómo planificar para la enfermedad. Con un diagnóstico temprano, el paciente puede tomar parte de la toma de decisiones para el futuro.
• El tratamiento dependerá de la etapa de la enfermedad. Hay diferentes medicamentos disponibles para ayudar a retrasar el progreso de la enfermedad.
• Los medicamentos para tratar los síntomas de comportamiento pueden ayudar al paciente a estar más cómodo y hacer su cuidado más fácil.
• El cuidar de un miembro de la familia con la enfermedad de Alzheimer es una tarea difícil. Las personas que lo cuidan deben cuidarse ellas mismas también. El unirse a un grupo de apoyo puede ayudar.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: Alzheimer’s Association, 225 N. Michigan Ave., Flr. 17, Chicago, IL 60601; (800) 272-3900; sitio web: www.alz.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Generalmente se recetan medicamentos que retrasan el progreso de la enfermedad, aunque estos funcionan sólo por un tiempo limitado.
• Se recetarán medicamentos para ayudara a controlar los síntomas de comportamiento (insomnio, agitación, deambulación, depresión, ansiedad y otros).

ACTIVIDAD
Con el tiempo, todas las actividades del paciente requerirán supervisión.

DIETA
Una dieta regular. Con el tiempo el paciente necesitará ayuda para comer.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de la enfermedad de Alzheimer.
• Usted tiene la responsabilidad de atender a alguien con la enfermedad de Alzheimer y tiene preguntas o preocupaciones acerca del paciente, los síntomas o el tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

AMEBIASIS (Amebic Dysentery; Entamebiasis)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Amebiasis is a parasitic infection of the intestines (bowels). Amebiasis is found worldwide, but occurs most often in developing countries. In the United States, the disease is fairly rare in the general population. It can affect all ages. Amebic dysentery is a rare, more severe form.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Only about 1 in 10 persons with the infection will have symptoms. Symptoms occur when the parasites (amoebas) invade the walls of the intestine.
• Diarrhea with bad-smelling stools. Constipation may alternate with diarrhea.
• Gas and stomach bloating, cramps, and tenderness.
• Amebic dysentery may cause bloody stools, stomach pain, chills, and fever.

CAUSES
A parasite, Entamoeba histolytica . The infection starts when someone swallows amoeba cysts (they can’t be seen) that contaminate food or water. The cysts travel to the intestines and can live there without causing symptoms. Then, for unknown reasons, the amoebas invade the intestine wall. When this happens, symptoms occur. Symptoms usually begin one to four weeks after exposure, but can take a few days or a year.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Immigrants from developing countries.
• Travel to a foreign country. In developing countries, the drinking water may be contaminated. In addition, some places use human feces for fertilizer.
• Male homosexuals.
• Living in institutions where there are poor sanitary conditions.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• No specific preventive steps. No vaccine is available.
• Wash hands often to prevent spread of any germs.
• Travelers to countries where there is a risk of infection need to take proper precautions regarding food and drink.
• Avoid sexual practices that increase risk of infection.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
In most cases, amebiasis is curable in three weeks with treatment.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
The amoebas can travel through the blood stream to other parts of the body and cause infection in different organs. This can lead to an amebic liver abscess (pus-filled area) or brain abscess.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask about your symptoms and recent travels. Medical tests may include blood and stool studies. If liver involvement is a concern, other tests may be done.
• Treatment is with drugs. A stool sample may be rechecked after treatment is complete to be sure the infection is cleared up.
• Amebiasis is contagious. Be extra careful about personal cleanliness. Bathe frequently. Wash hands with warm water and soap after each bowel movement and before handling food.
• In severe cases of dysentery, hospital care may be needed. Fluid replacement may be necessary to manage dehydration due to diarrhea.

MEDICATIONS
Antibiotic drugs to treat amebiasis are usually prescribed. These are most often taken by mouth, but in some cases may be injected.

ACTIVITY
Get extra rest until diarrhea and other symptoms improve.

DIET
No special diet. Be sure to drink plenty of fluids to help prevent dehydration.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of amebiasis.
• The following occur during treatment:
– Abdominal cramps continue longer than 24 hours.
– Diarrhea or blood in stool increases.
– Vomiting begins.
– Pain begins over liver or jaundice (yellow skin or eyes) occurs.
– A skin rash appears.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

AMEBIASIS INTESTINAL (Disenteria Amebiana) (Amebiasis [Amebic Dysentery; Entamebiasis]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La amebiasis intestinal es una infección parasítica de los intestinos (entrañas). La amebiasis intestinal se encuentra en todas las partes del mundo, pero ocurre más frecuentemente en países en desarrollo. En los Estados Unidos, la enfermedad es muy rara en la población general. Esta puede afectar a todas las edades. La disentería amebiana es una forma rara y más grave.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Sólo 1 de 10 personas con la infección presentará los síntomas. Los síntomas ocurren cuando los parásitos (amebas) invaden las paredes del intestino.
• Diarrea con heces que generan un mal olor. El estreñimiento se puede alternar con la diarrea.
• Gas y borborigmos, calambres y sensibilidad del estómago.
• La disentería amebiana puede causar heces sanguinolentas, dolor estomacal, escalofríos y fiebre.

CAUSAS
Un parásito llamado Entamoeba histolytica. La infección comienza cuando alguien ingiere comida o agua contaminadas con quistes (no se pueden ver) de ameba. Los quistes viajan a los intestinos y pueden vivir en ellos sin presentar los síntomas. Luego, por razones desconocidas, las amebas invaden las paredes del intestino. Cuando esto ocurre, los síntomas se presentan. Los síntomas generalmente comienzan entre 1 y 4 semanas después de la exposición, pero pueden ocurrir en pocos días o un año.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Inmigrantes de países en desarrollo.
• Viajar a países extranjeros. En países en desarrollo, el agua potable puede estar contaminada. En adición, en algunos lugares utilizan heces humanas como fertilizantes.
• Hombres homosexuales.
• Vivir en condiciones sanitarias pobres.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• No existen medidas preventivas específicas. No hay una vacuna disponible.
• Lávese las manos frecuentemente para prevenir la propagación de cualquier germen.
• Los viajeros a países donde existe el riesgo de infección necesitan tomar las precauciones apropiadas con respecto a la comida y las bebidas.
• Evite las prácticas sexuales que aumentan el riesgo de infección.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
En la mayoría de los casos, la amebiasis es curable en 3 semanas con tratamiento.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Las amebas pueden viajar a través del torrente sanguíneo a otras partes del cuerpo y causar infecciones en diferentes órganos. Esto puede producir un absceso amebiano en el hígado (área llena de pus) o un absceso cerebral.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará sobre sus síntomas y viajes recientes. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir un análisis de sangre y de heces. Si la posibilidad de infección al hígado es una preocupación, otros exámenes pueden ser realizados.
• El tratamiento es con medicamentos. Se puede volver a hacer un análisis de heces después de completar el tratamiento para asegurarse de que la infección haya desaparecido.
• La amebiasis es contagiosa. Sea extremadamente cuidadoso con respecto a la limpieza personal. Báñese frecuentemente. Lávese las manos con agua tibia y jabón después de cada evacuación y antes de tocar la comida.
• En casos graves de disentería, se puede necesitar hospitalización. Se puede necesitar el reemplazo de fluidos para controlar la deshidratación causada por la diarrea.

MEDICAMENTOS
Generalmente, se recetan antibióticos para tratar la amebiasis. Estos son más frecuentes por vía oral, pero en algunos casos pueden ser por vía intravenosa.

ACTIVIDAD
Mucho descanso hasta que la diarrea y los otros síntomas mejoren.

DIETA
Ninguna dieta en especial. Asegúrese de tomar suficientes líquidos para ayudar a prevenir la deshidratación.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia presenta los síntomas de amebiasis.
• Lo siguiente ocurre durante el tratamiento:
– Calambres abdominales continuos que duran más de 24 horas
– Aumento de diarrea o sangre en las heces
– Comienzo de vómitos
– Comienzo de dolor sobre el hígado u ocurre ictericia (ojos o piel amarillentos)
– Aparecen erupciones en la piel
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

AMENORRHEA, PRIMARY

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Primary amenorrhea is complete absence of menstruation in a young woman who is at least 16 years old, or at age 14 with a lack of normal growth or absence of secondary sexual development. It is a rare disorder, as over 95% of girls have their first menstrual period by age 15. Most girls begin menstruating by age 14; average age is 12 years, 8 months.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
Lack of menstrual periods after puberty.

CAUSES
A failure of certain complex body functions that normally result in menstruation. There are a number of disorders or health problems that can lead to the failure.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Delayed puberty.
• Congenital problems, such as the absence or abnormal formation of female organs (vagina, uterus, and ovaries).
• Intact hymen (membrane covering the vaginal opening) has no opening to allow passage of menstrual flow.
• Disorders (tumors, infections, or other problems) of the endocrine system, including the pituitary, hypothalamus, thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal, and ovarian glands.
• Chromosome disorders or chronic illness.
• Polycystic ovaries (Stein-Leventhal syndrome).
• Pregnancy.
• Severe nutritional or physical stressors such as anorexia, competitive sports, or intense training (e.g., in gymnasts, ballet dancers, or long distance runners).
• Use of drugs, including oral contraceptives, anticancer drugs, barbiturates, narcotics, cortisone drugs, chlordiazepoxide, and reserpine.
• Family tendency to start menstruation late.
• Excessive dieting or weight loss.
• Extreme obesity.
• Rarely, prior gynecological surgery.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
No specific preventive measures. Avoid risk factors where possible.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• The absence of menstruation is not a health risk in itself, but the cause should be found.
• Amenorrhea is often curable with hormone treatment or treatment of the underlying cause. Treatment may be delayed to age 18, unless the cause can be identified and treated safely.
• Causes that sometimes cannot be corrected include chromosome disorders and abnormalities of the reproductive system.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Emotional stress about sexual development.
• May lead to infertility.
• Other complications may occur, depending on the underlying cause.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and a pelvic exam. Questions will be asked about your medical history and your family’s medical history, and about your lifestyle (e.g., diet, exercise, etc.). Medical testing may include urine and blood studies; hormone levels; and liver, thyroid, and adrenal function. Other tests may be done to diagnose an underlying disorder.
• Treatment may involve hormone replacement therapy. Treatment for amenorrhea not related to hormone deficiency depends on the cause.
• Counseling may help if amenorrhea is related to stress, results from an eating disorder, or for emotional concerns about sexual development.
• Surgery to correct abnormalities of the reproductive system or for cysts may rarely be needed.

MEDICATIONS

• Hormones may be prescribed if there is a hormone imbalance. They may correct the problem.
• Birth control pills may be prescribed for polycystic ovary syndrome.
• Bromocriptine may be prescribed for pituitary tumor.

ACTIVITY
Exercise regularly, but not to excess. Reduce exercise or athletic activities if they are too strenuous.

DIET
If overweight or underweight, a change in diet to correct the problem may bring on a period.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You are 16 years old and have never had a period.
• Periods don’t begin within 6 months, despite treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

AMENORREA PRIMARIA (Amenorrhea, Primary) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La amenorrea primaria es la ausencia completa de la menstruación en las mujeres jóvenes de por lo menos 16 años de edad, o a la edad de 14 años con la falta de un crecimiento normal o la ausencia del desarrollo sexual secundario. Es un trastorno raro, ya que más del 95% de las niñas tienen su primer periodo menstrual a la edad de 15 años o antes. La mayoría de las niñas comienzan a menstruar a la edad de 14 años o antes; la edad promedio es 12 años con 8 meses.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES
Falta de periodos menstruales después de la pubertad.

CAUSAS
Una falla en ciertas funciones corporales complejas que normalmente resultan en la menstruación. Hay un número de trastornos o problemas de salud que producen este fallo.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Pubertad retrasada.
• Problemas congénitos tales como la ausencia o formación anormal de los órganos femeninos (vagina, útero y ovarios).
• Himen (membrana que cubre la abertura vaginal) intacto; no tiene ninguna abertura para permitir el paso del flujo menstrual.
• Trastornos (tumores, infecciones u otros problemas) del sistema endocrino, incluyendo la pituitaria, el hipotálamo, la tiroides, la paratiroides, la glándula adrenal y los ovarios.
• Trastornos de los cromosomas o enfermedad crónica.
• Ovarios poliquísticos (Síndrome de Stein-Leventhal).
• Embarazo.
• Estrés severo, nutricional o físico, tal como anorexia, deportes competitivos, o entrenamiento intensivo (p. ej., gimnastas, bailarinas de ballet, o corredoras de larga distancia).
• Uso de medicamentos incluyendo anticonceptivos orales, medicamentos anticancerosos, barbitúricos, narcóticos, cortisona, clorodiazepóxido y reserpina.
• Tendencia familiar a comenzar la menstruación tarde.
• Exceso de dieta o pérdida de peso.
• Obesidad extrema.
• En raras ocasiones, haber tenido cirugía ginecológica previa.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No existen medidas preventivas específicas. Evite los factores de riesgo cuando le sea posible.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• La ausencia de menstruación no es un riesgo de por sí para la salud, pero la causa se debe encontrar.
• La amenorrea es frecuentemente curable con tratamiento hormonal o tratamiento de la causa subyacente. El tratamiento puede ser retrasado hasta la edad de 18 años, a menos que la causa pueda ser identificada y tratada en forma segura.
• Las causas que algunas veces no se pueden corregir incluyen los trastornos de los cromosomas y las anormalidades del sistema reproductivo.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Estrés emocional con respecto al desarrollo sexual.
• Puede producir infertilidad.
• Otras complicaciones pueden ocurrir, dependiendo de la causa subyacente.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y pélvico. Se le harán preguntas sobre sus antecedentes médicos, los antecedentes médicos de su familia y sobre su estilo de vida (p. ej., dieta, ejercicios, etc.). Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir un análisis de orina y de sangre, de los niveles hormonales; y de las funciones de la tiroides, el hígado y la glándula adrenal. Otros exámenes pueden ser realizados para diagnosticar un trastorno subyacente.
• El tratamiento puede requerir una terapia de reemplazo de hormonas. El tratamiento de amenorrea que no está relacionada con una deficiencia hormonal dependerá de la causa.
• La terapia psicológica puede ayudar si la amenorrea está asociada al estrés o si es el resultado de trastornos alimenticios; también puede ser beneficiosa cuando hay preocupaciones emocionales con respecto al desarrollo sexual.
• En raras ocasiones, la cirugía para corregir anormalidades del sistema reproductivo o para quistes puede ser necesaria.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Hormonas pueden ser recetadas si existe un desequilibrio hormonal. Estas pueden corregir el problema.
• Píldoras anticonceptivas pueden ser recetadas para el síndrome de ovario poliquístico.
• Bromocriptina puede ser recetada para tumores de la pituitaria.

ACTIVIDAD
Haga ejercicio regularmente, pero no en exceso. Disminuya el ejercicio o actividades atléticas si son muy extenuantes.

DIETA
Si tiene sobrepeso o un peso más bajo de lo normal, un cambio en la dieta para corregir el problema puede producir un periodo.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted tiene 16 años de edad y nunca ha tenido un periodo.
• Los periodos no comienzan en 6 meses, a pesar del tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

AMENORRHEA, SECONDARY

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Secondary amenorrhea is absence of menstruation in a woman who has previously menstruated.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• No menstrual periods for at least 3 to 6 months.
• Other symptoms may include infertility, acne, excess hair growth (hirsutism) or hair loss, obesity, galactorrhea (breasts produce milk when not breast-feeding), headaches, and vaginal dryness.

CAUSES
A stopping of certain complex body functions that normally result in menstruation. There are a number of conditions or health problems that can lead to the failure. Pregnancy is one of the most common causes.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Breast-feeding an infant.
• Discontinuing use of birth-control pills.
• Menopause (if a woman is over 35 and not pregnant).
• Emotional stress or psychological disorder.
• Surgical removal of the ovaries or uterus, or complications as a result of gynecological surgery.
• Disorder of the endocrine system, including the pituitary, hypothalamus, thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal, and ovarian glands.
• Hormone imbalance.
• Chronic illness, such as diabetes or tuberculosis.
• Obesity or eating disorders (anorexia or bulimia).
• Strenuous program of physical exercise, such as long-distance running, gymnastics, or ballet.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
To help avoid amenorrhea, maintain a healthy lifestyle.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• Amenorrhea is not a threat to health. Whether it can be corrected varies with the underlying cause.
• If from pregnancy or breast-feeding, menstruation will resume when these conditions cease.
• If from discontinuing use of oral contraceptives, periods should begin in 2 months to 2 years.
• If from menopause, periods will become less frequent or may never resume. Hysterectomy also ends menstruation permanently.
• If from endocrine disorders, hormone replacement usually causes periods to resume.
• If from eating disorders, successful treatment of that disorder will help menstruation to resume.
• If from diabetes or tuberculosis, menstruation may never resume.
• If from strenuous exercise, periods usually resume when exercise is decreased.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• None likely, if there is no serious underlying cause.
• May experience estrogen deficiency symptoms, such as hot flashes and vaginal dryness. May affect fertility.
• Reduced bone density (osteoporosis).

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and a pelvic exam. Questions will be asked about your medical history and your family’s medical history, and about your lifestyle (e.g., diet, exercise, etc.). Medical tests may include a pregnancy test, blood studies of hormone levels, and a Pap smear. Surgical diagnostic procedures such as laparoscopy or hysteroscopy may be recommended. These procedures use a special instrument to see inside the body’s organs.
• Treatment will depend on the cause. It may include lifestyle changes, drugs, treatment of an underlying disorder, and rarely, surgery.
• Counseling may help if amenorrhea is related to stress or other emotional problems.
• Keep a record of menstrual cycles to aid in early detection of recurrent amenorrhea.
• To learn more, perform a web search. A good site to start with is www.4women.gov .

MEDICATIONS

• Progesterone and/or estrogen may be prescribed. If bleeding occurs after progesterone is withdrawn, the reproduction system is functional.
• Drugs to treat an underlying disorder may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY
Exercise regularly, but not to excess. Reduce exercise or athletic activities if they are too strenuous.

DIET
If overweight or underweight, a change in diet to correct the problem may be recommended.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has amenorrhea.
• Periods don’t resume within 6 months.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

AMENORREA SECUNDARIA (Amenorrhea, Secondary) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La amenorrea secundaria es la ausencia de la menstruación en una mujer que previamente ha menstruado.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• No tener periodos menstruales por lo menos de 3 a 6 meses.
• Otros síntomas incluyen infertilidad, acné, crecimiento excesivo de vello, (hirsutismo) o pérdida de cabello, obesidad, galactorrea (producción de leche en los senos cuando no está lactando), dolores de cabeza y sequedad vaginal.

CAUSAS
Una falla en ciertas funciones corporales complejas que normalmente resultan en menstruación. Hay un número de condiciones o problemas de salud que producen este fallo. El embarazo es una de las causas más comunes.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Lactancia de un infante.
• Descontinuar el uso de píldoras anticonceptivas.
• Menopausia (si la mujer es mayor de 35 años de edad y no está embarazada).
• Estrés emocional o trastorno psicológico.
• Extirpación quirúrgica de los ovarios o del útero, u otras complicaciones como resultado de una cirugía ginecológica.
• Trastornos del sistema endocrino, incluyendo la pituitaria, el hipotálamo, la tiroides, la paratiroides, la glándula adrenal y los ovarios.
• Desequilibrio hormonal.
• Enfermedad crónica, tal como diabetes o tuberculosis.
• Obesidad o trastornos alimentarios (anorexia o bulimia).
• Programa extenuante de ejercicio físico, tal como correr larga distancia, gimnasia o ballet.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
Para evitar la amenorrea, mantenga un estilo de vida saludable.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• La amenorrea no representa una amenaza para la salud. La posibilidad de corregirla depende de la causa subyacente.
• Si es por embarazo o por lactancia, la menstruación se reanudará cuando la condición termine.
• Si es por descontinuar el uso de anticonceptivos orales, los periodos deberían comenzar entre 2 meses y 2 años.
• Si es por la menopausia, los periodos serán menos frecuentes o puede que nunca se reanuden. La histerectomía también termina la menstruación permanentemente.
• Si es por trastornos endocrinos, la terapia de remplazo hormonal usualmente causa que los periodos se reanuden.
• Si es por trastornos alimentarios, el tratamiento exitoso del trastorno ayudará a que la menstruación se reanude.
• Si es por diabetes o tuberculosis, la menstruación pueda que nunca regrese.
• Si es por ejercicio vigoroso, los periodos generalmente se reanudan cuando el ejercicio disminuye.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Ninguna es probable si no existe una causa subyacente seria.
• Puede experimentar los síntomas de deficiencia de estrógeno, tales como los sofocones y la sequedad vaginal.
• Puede afectar la fertilidad.
• Reducción de la densidad ósea (osteoporosis).

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y pélvico. Se le harán preguntas sobre sus antecedentes médicos, los antecedentes médicos de su familia y sobre su estilo de vida (p. ej., dieta, ejercicios, etc.). Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir un examen de embarazo, un análisis de sangre de los niveles hormonales y raspe del útero (examen de Papanicolaou). Los procedimientos quirúrgicos de diagnóstico tales como la laparoscopia o la histeroscopia pueden ser recomendados. Estos procedimientos utilizan un instrumento especial para ver dentro de los órganos del cuerpo.
• El tratamiento dependerá de la causa. Este puede incluir cambios en el estilo de vida, medicamentos, el tratamiento de un trastorno subyacente y, en raras ocasiones, cirugía.
• La terapia psicológica puede ayudar si la amenorrea está asociada al estrés u otros problemas emocionales.
• Mantenga un registro de los ciclos menstruales para ayudarle en la detección temprana de la amenorrea recurrente.
• Para obtener más información haga un búsqueda en la Internet. Una excelente página de Internet para comenzar es www.4women.gov .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Progesterona y/o estrógeno puede(n) ser recetado(s). Si ocurre un sangrado después de descontinuar la progesterona, el sistema reproductivo es funcional.
• Se pueden recetar medicamentos para tratar un trastorno subyacente.

ACTIVIDAD
Haga ejercicio regularmente, pero no en exceso. Reduzca los ejercicios o las actividades atléticas si son muy extenuantes.

DIETA
Si tiene sobrepeso o un peso más bajo de lo normal, un cambio de dieta para corregir el problema puede ser recomendado.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene amenorrea.
• Los periodos no comienzan en 6 meses.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS (ALS; Lou Gehrig’s Disease)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive breakdown of the cells of the spinal cord. This results in gradual loss of muscle function. It involves the central nervous system and the muscle system, especially in the hands, forearms, legs, head, and neck. It usually affects people aged 40 to 60 years, and occurs more often in men than women.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Muscle twitching and weakness. It begins in the hands and spreads to the arms and legs. The weakness then begins to affect muscles that control breathing and swallowing.
• Muscle cramps.
• Stiffening and spasticity of muscle groups.
• Weight loss.
• Slurring of speech.
• Mental function is rarely affected.
• Sudden involuntary bursts of laughter or crying.

CAUSES
Unknown. Research suggests that there may be more than one cause.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Age over 40.
• Family history of ALS.
• Smoking.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Cannot be prevented at present.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• This condition is currently considered incurable. It is usually fatal in 2 to 5 years, but 20% of patients survive 5 years and 10% survive 10 years.
• Medical research into causes and treatment continues. There is hope for more effective treatment.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• The disorder affects the patient’s personal relationships, career, income, muscle coordination, sexuality, and energy.
• Progressive inability to walk and to do things involved with daily living, such as being able to feed oneself.
• Wheelchair use is needed.
• Pressure sores or skin infections due to being bedridden or in a wheelchair.
• Pneumonia due to swallowing difficulty and choking.
• The disorder is eventually fatal due to respiratory muscle weakness.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms. No one test diagnoses ALS. Medical tests include nerve studies (electromyography and nerve conduction velocity). Tests may include blood and urine studies, x-rays, and others.
• There is no specific treatment. Supportive care is provided to relieve symptoms and for complications.
• Aids for helping with daily living are available. These can help maintain some function and quality of life.
• Counseling may be helpful in finding ways for both the patient and the family to cope with the diagnosis.
• Surgery for tracheostomy is usually required once breathing difficulties develop.
• In later stages of the disease, the patient will require complete nursing care.
• Patient and family may benefit from hospice care.
• To learn more: ALS Association, 27001 Agoura Rd., Suite 150, Calabasas Hills, CA 91301; (800) 782-4747; website: www.alsa.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Riluzole may be prescribed. It can help delay the progress of ALS for a few months.
• Antibiotics will be prescribed if infection develops.
• Baclofen or tizanidine may help reduce spasticity.
• Antidepressants may help to decrease excess saliva.

ACTIVITY

• Stay as active as possible. Weakness will gradually limit movement. A physical therapy program can help to maintain independence as long as possible.
• Obtain equipment that will aid in mobility, such as a walker or wheelchair.

DIET

• Soft, easy-to-swallow foods may be needed if swallowing is a problem.
• May require tube feedings eventually.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis symptoms.
• After diagnosis, symptoms occur that cause concern.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ESCLEROSIS LATERAL AMIOTROFICA (Enfermedad de Lou Lehrig; Sindrome de Charcot) (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis [ALS; Lou Gehrig’s Disease]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La esclerosis lateral amiotrófica es una degeneración progresiva de las células de la médula espinal. Esto resulta en una pérdida gradual de la función muscular. Involucra el sistema nervioso central y el sistema muscular, especialmente en las manos, antebrazos, piernas, cabeza y cuello. Por lo general afecta a personas entre los 40 y 60 años de edad y ocurre más frecuentemente en los hombres que en las mujeres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Debilidad y espasmos musculares. Comienza en las manos y se propaga a los brazos y piernas. La debilidad luego comienza a afectar los músculos que controlan la respiración y la deglución (tragar).
• Calambres musculares.
• Rigidez y espasticidad de los grupos musculares.
• Pérdida de peso.
• Arrastre del habla.
• La función mental rara vez se ve afectada.
• Arranques involuntarios repentinos de risas o sollozos.

CAUSAS
Desconocidas. La investigación sugiere que debe de haber más de una causa.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Edad mayor de 40 años.
• Antecedentes familiares de esclerosis lateral amiotrófica.
• Fumar.
MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
Actualmente, no se puede prevenir.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• Actualmente, esta condición se considera incurable. Por lo general, resulta fatal en 2 a 5 años, pero un 20% de los pacientes sobreviven 5 años y un 10% sobrevive 10 años.
• La investigación médica sobre las causas y los tratamientos continúa. Existen esperanzas de tratamientos más efectivos.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• El trastorno afecta las relaciones personales del paciente, su profesión, ingresos, coordinación muscular, sexualidad y energía.
• La incapacidad progresiva para caminar y realizar las tareas del diario vivir, tales como poder alimentarse por su cuenta.
• El uso de una silla de ruedas es necesario.
• Lesiones por presión o infecciones de piel producidas por estar en la cama o en una silla de ruedas.
• Pulmonía producida por dificultad para tragar y ahogarse.
• El trastorno resulta fatal finalmente a causa de la debilidad de los músculos respiratorios.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará sobre sus síntomas. No existe un examen médico específico para diagnosticar la esclerosis lateral amiotrófica. Los exámenes médicos incluyen estudios de los nervios (electromiografía y velocidad de conducción del nervio). Los exámenes pueden incluir análisis de sangre y de orina, radiografías y otros.
• No existen tratamientos específicos. El cuidado de apoyo se provee para aliviar los síntomas y las complicaciones.
• La asistencia para ayudar con las tareas del diario vivir está disponible. Esto puede ayudar a mantener alguna función y la calidad de vida.
• La terapia psicológica puede ayudar al paciente y a la familia para buscar maneras de enfrentar el diagnóstico.
• La cirugía para realizar una traqueotomía por lo general es requerida una vez las dificultades para respirar se presentan.
• En las etapas finales de la enfermedad, el paciente requerirá de un cuidado médico completo.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: ALS Association, 27001 Agoura Rd., Suite 150, Calabasas Hills, CA 91301, (800) 782-4747, sitio web: www.alsa.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se le puede recetar Riluzol. Este puede ayudar a retrasar el progreso de la enfermedad por unos pocos meses.
• Se le pueden recetar antibióticos si se desarrolla una infección.
• Baclofeno o tizanidina pueden ayudar a reducir la espasticidad.
• Los antidepresivos pueden ayudar a reducir el exceso de saliva.

ACTIVIDAD

• Manténgase tan activo como le sea posible. La debilidad gradualmente limitará el movimiento. Un programa de terapia física puede ayudar a mantener la independencia por el mayor tiempo posible.
• Obtenga un equipo que le asista en la movilidad, tales como un andador o una silla de ruedas.

DIETA

• Las comidas blandas y fáciles de tragar pueden ser necesarias si existe un problema para tragar.
• Finalmente, la alimentación por tubo puede ser requerida.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted u otro miembro de su familia presenta los síntomas de esclerosis lateral amiotrófica.
• Después del diagnóstico, ocurren síntomas que le causan preocupación.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ANAL FISSURE

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Anal fissure is a laceration, tear, or crack in the anal canal. It can affect all age groups, including infants.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Sharp pain with passage of a hard or bulky stool. The pain may last up to an hour, and returns with the next bowel movement.
• Pain when sitting on a hard surface.
• Streaks of blood on the toilet paper, underwear, or diaper.
• Itching around the rectum.
• Refusal to have a bowel movement (in children).

CAUSES
The exact cause is unknown. Symptoms usually occur after the stretching of the anus from a large, hard stool.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Constipation or prolonged diarrhea.
• Childbirth.
• Inflammatory bowel disease (e.g., Crohn’s disease).
• Certain infections (e.g., HIV or tuberculosis), anal trauma, or low fiber diet may play a role.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Avoid constipation by:
– Drinking at least 8 glasses of water daily.
– Eating a diet high in fiber.
– Using stool softeners, if needed.
• Don’t strain when having a bowel movement.
• Avoid anal trauma.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Most fissures heal on their own. Others can be treated successfully. Most infants and young children recover after the stool is softened.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
Fissure may become chronic and fail to heal.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam of the anus and rectum to confirm the diagnosis. Other medical tests are usually not needed.
• Treatment usually begins with self-care. Conservative therapy is safe, has few side effects, and is usually the first step in therapy. The next steps may involve prescribed topical drugs or botulinum injection, and surgery if needed.
• Gently clean the anus with soap and water after each bowel movement.
• To relieve muscle spasms and pain around the anus, apply a warm towel to the area.
• Sitz baths also relieve pain. Use 8 inches of warm water in the bathtub, 2 or 3 times a day for 10 to 20 minutes.
• Surgery may be needed in some cases. The options, and the risks and benefits will be discussed with you.

MEDICATIONS

• For minor discomfort, use nonprescription topical anesthetics, such as lidocaine gel.
• Use stool softeners (e.g., docusate sodium or docusate calcium).
• Topical nitroglycerin may be prescribed. It can cause headache in some patients.
• Topical calcium channel blockers may be prescribed (e.g., diltiazem or nifedipine). An oral form of the drug is sometimes prescribed.
• Botulinum toxin (Botox) injections may be prescribed to help relax the sphincter muscles.

ACTIVITY
No limits. Physical activity reduces constipation risk.

DIET
Eat a high-fiber diet and drink extra fluids to prevent constipation.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or your child has symptoms of an anal fissure.
• Pain continues despite treatment.
• Drugs used for treatment cause side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

FISURA ANAL (Anal Fissure) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Una fisura anal es una laceración, desgarro o hendidura en el canal del ano. Puede afectar a personas de todas las edades, incluso a los infantes.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Dolor agudo al evacuar excremento duro o voluminoso. El dolor puede durar hasta una hora y regresar al evacuar otra vez.
• Dolor al sentarse sobre una superficie dura.
• Estrías de sangre en el papel higiénico, en la ropa interior o en el pañal.
• Picazón alrededor del recto.
• El niño puede negarse a defecar.

CAUSAS
Se desconoce la causa exacta, pero los síntomas ocurren por lo general después que el ano se ha dilatado cuando la deposición es dura y voluminosa.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Estreñimiento o diarreas prolongadas.
• Parto.
• Enfermedad inflamatoria de los intestinos (p. ej., enfermedad de Crohn).
• Ciertas infecciones (p. ej., VIH o tuberculosis), trauma del ano, o una dieta baja en fibras pueden jugar un papel.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Evite el estreñimiento así:
– Tome por los menos 8 vasos de agua al día
– Coma alimentos ricos en fibra
– Tome medicamentos para ablandar el excremento si los necesita
• No haga una fuerza excesiva cuando defeca.
• Evite el trauma del ano.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
La mayoría de las fisuras se sanan por sí solas. Otras pueden ser tratadas con éxito. La mayoría de los infantes y niños pequeños se recuperan una vez que el excremento se ablanda.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Las fisuras se pueden volver crónicas y no sanarse.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico del ano y del recto para confirmar el diagnóstico. Generalmente no son necesarios otros exámenes médicos.
• El tratamiento generalmente comienza con autocuidado. La terapia conservativa es segura, tiene pocos efectos secundarios y generalmente es el primer paso en la terapia. Los siguientes pasos pueden involucrar la prescripción de medicamentos tópicos o inyecciones de botulinum y cirugía si es necesario.
• Límpiese suavemente el ano con agua y jabón después de cada deposición.
• Aplíquese una toalla tibia para aliviar los espasmos musculares y el dolor en la zona del ano.
• Los baños de asiento también alivian el dolor. Llene la bañera con agua tibia, a un nivel de 8 pulgadas, y siéntese en el agua durante 10 a 20 minutos, dos o tres veces al día.
• Se puede necesitar cirugía en algunos casos. Se le explicarán las opciones, así como sus riesgos y beneficios.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Para molestias leves, use anestésicos tópicos de venta sin receta, tal como gel de lidocaína.
• Use ablandadores de excremento (p. ej., sodio de docusato o calcio de docusato).
• Se puede prescribir nitroglicerina tópica. Puede causar dolores de cabeza en algunos pacientes.
• Se pueden prescribir bloqueadores tópicos de los canales de calcio (p. ej., diltiazem o nifedipina).
• Las inyecciones de toxina botulinum (botox) pueden ser prescritas para ayudar a relajar el músculo esfínter.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin restricciones. La actividad física disminuye el riesgo de estreñimiento.

DIETA
Coma alimentos ricos en fibra y tome mucho líquido para evitar el estreñimiento.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o alguno de sus hijos tiene síntomas de fisura anal.
• El dolor continúa a pesar del tratamiento.
• Los medicamentos del tratamiento producen efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ANAL FISTULA

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Anal fistula is a very small tube or tract that leads from the anal canal (the last part of the rectum) to the skin near the anal opening. Watery pus drains through this opening and causes irritation to the skin. Some fistulas cause no symptoms. Fistulas can affect all ages.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Discharge from the anus. There may be bleeding.
• Skin irritation or itching around the anus.
• Pain when passing a bowel movement.
• Tender lump near the anus.

CAUSES

• Anal fistulas are usually caused by a prior anorectal abscess. An anorectal abscess is caused by a bacterial infection of one of the glands in the anal canal. Some patients will have both an abscess and fistula.
• Other anal fistulas may be caused by infection, injury (trauma), disease, or radiation therapy.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Inflammatory bowel disease (e.g., Crohn’s disease).
• Diverticulitis, tuberculosis, chlamydial infection, large intestine cancer, HIV infection, certain other disorders, or radiation therapy.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
There are no specific preventive measures. Getting medical care for an anorectal abscess may help.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Anal fistula treatment can provide satisfactory results in most cases. The goals are to heal the fistula, relieve the symptoms, avoid sphincter muscle problems and other complications, and prevent fistula recurrence. In some cases, more than one type of treatment may be needed. Healing time will vary and may take weeks to months.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Treatment may lead to complications. Some degree of fecal incontinence (unable to control bowels) may develop. Pain, infection, bleeding, delayed healing, and other complications may occur.
• Rarely, a temporary colostomy (feces is diverted to an outside opening) may be required.
• Anal fistula can recur.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will ask questions about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam of the anal area will be done. Medical studies (usually under anesthesia) are needed for diagnosis. An anoscope (a flexible tube with a lighted end) is used to see inside the anus and anal canal. Other tests may be done for complex fistulas or to look for an underlying disorder (e.g., Crohn’s). These may include blood tests, MRI, sigmoidoscopy, x-rays, ultrasound, and others.
• Treatment depends on the results of the medical tests and exact location of the fistula. Some anal fistulas can be simple and others are more complex and difficult to treat. There are several treatment options and each has benefits and risks. They will be discussed with you.
• Treatment may involve surgery (called fistulotomy or fistulectomy) to open the fistula. Advancement flap is a surgical option. Seton procedures use a surgical thread to allow for fistula draining and healing. Fibrin glue injection and anal fistula plug are other options.
• At home, sitz baths help relieve discomfort. Sit in a tub of warm water (not hot) for 10 to 15 minutes several times a day. Dry the area carefully and completely.

MEDICATIONS

• To prevent constipation, use stool softeners.
• Antibiotics may be prescribed if infection is present.
• Drugs for pain may be prescribed after treatment.

ACTIVITY
You will be advised about resuming work and normal activities depending on the specific treatment.

DIET
A high fiber diet may be recommended.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has anal fistula symptoms.
• Symptoms recur or new symptoms develop after treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

FISTULA ANAL (Anal Fistula) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Fístula anal es un tubo o tracto muy pequeño que va del conducto anal (el extremo final del recto) a la piel cerca del orificio del ano. Un pus aguado se drena a través de este orificio y causa irritación de la piel. Algunas fístulas no causan síntomas. Las fístulas pueden afectar a todas las edades.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Excreción del ano. Puede sangrar.
• Irritación de la piel o picazón alrededor del ano.
• Dolor al defecar.
• Un bulto blando y sensible cerca del ano.

CAUSAS

• Las fístulas anales generalmente son el resultado de un previo absceso anorectal. El absceso anorectal es producido por una infección bacteriana de una de las glándulas en el canal anal. Algunos pacientes padecen tanto de un absceso como de una fístula.
• Otras fístulas anales pueden ser el resultado de una infección, lesión (trauma), enfermedad o terapia de radiación.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Enfermedad inflamatoria intestinal (p. ej., enfermedad de Crohn).
• La diverticulitis, tuberculosis, infección por clamidia, cáncer del intestino grueso, infección VIH, ciertos otros trastornos o terapia de radiación.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No hay medidas preventivas específicas. Obtener atención médica por un absceso anorectal puede ayudar.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
El tratamiento de la fístula anal puede proporcionar resultados satisfactorios en la mayoría de los casos. Los objetivos son curar la fístula, aliviar los síntomas, evitar problemas musculares del esfínter y otras complicaciones, así como prevenir la reaparición de la fístula. En algunos casos, se puede necesitar más de un tipo de tratamiento. El tiempo de recuperación varía y puede tomar semanas o meses.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• El tratamiento puede conducir a complicaciones. Se puede desarrollar un cierto grado de incontinencia fecal (incapacidad para controlar los intestinos). Dolor, infección, sangrado, curación retardada y posiblemente otras complicaciones pueden ocurrir.
• En raras ocasiones, una colostomía temporal (la desviación de las heces hacia una abertura exterior) puede ser requerida.
• La fístula anal puede reaparecer.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de salud le hará preguntas sobre sus síntomas e historia médica. Se le hará un examen físico del área anal. Se necesitan estudios médicos (generalmente bajo anestesia) para la diagnosis. Se usa un anoscopio (un tubo flexible con luz en una punta) para mirar dentro del ano y el canal anal. Se pueden realizar otras pruebas para fístulas complejas o para detectar un trastorno subyacente (p. ej., la enfermedad de Crohn). Estas pueden incluir análisis de sangre, resonancia magnética, colonoscopia, radiografías, ultrasonido y otros.
• El tratamiento depende de los resultados de las pruebas médicas y la ubicación exacta de la fístula. Algunas fístulas anales pueden ser simples y otras son más complejas y difíciles de tratar. Hay varias opciones de tratamiento y cada una acarrea beneficios y riesgos. Se hablará de ello con usted.
• El tratamiento puede involucrar cirugía (llamada fistulotomía o fistulectomía) para abrir la fístula. Aleta de avance es una opción quirúrgica. El procedimiento con seton usa hilo quirúrgico para permitir el drenaje y curación de la fístula. Otras opciones son la inyección de cola de fibrina y un tapón de fístula anal.
• En el hogar, baños de asiento ayudan a aliviar la molestia. Siéntese en una bañera de agua tibia (no caliente) de 10 a 15 minutos varias veces por día. Seque el área cuidadosa y completamente.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Para prevenir el estreñimiento, use ablandadores de las heces.
• Se le pueden prescribir antibióticos si se presenta una infección.
• Después del tratamiento se le pueden prescribir medicamentos para combatir el dolor.

ACTIVIDAD
Dependiendo del tratamiento específico, se le informará sobre la reanudación del trabajo y de las actividades normales.

DIETA
Se le puede recomendar una dieta rica en fibras dietéticas.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de fístula anal.
• Los síntomas recurren o nuevos síntomas aparecen después del tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ANAPHYLAXIS (Allergic Shock)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening allergic response to drugs or other allergy-causing substances (allergens). Reactions that happen the fastest are often the worst.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Any of the following can happen within seconds or a few minutes after being exposed to something that you are very allergic to:
– Tingling or numbness around the mouth.
– Sneezing, coughing, or wheezing.
– Swelling around the face or hands.
– Feeling anxious.
– Weak, rapid pulse; pounding heartbeat.
– Stomach cramps, vomiting, and diarrhea.
– Itching all over. Hives often appear.
– Watery eyes.
– Chest feels tight; trouble breathing.
– Swelling or itching in the mouth or throat.
– Faintness; loss of consciousness.

CAUSES

• Sometimes the body overreacts when it tries to rid itself of the material it is allergic to. This can be life-threatening. Allergens that most often cause reactions:
– Drugs of all types, especially penicillin. Shots are a bigger risk than eyedrops or drugs taken by mouth.
– Stings or bites from insects, such as bees, wasps, hornets, biting ants, and some spiders.
– Vaccines.
– Pollen.
– Injected chemicals used with some types of x-rays.
– Foods, especially peanuts, tree nuts (pecans, walnuts), eggs, milk, shellfish, and fish.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• A previous mild allergy to allergens listed in Causes.
• A history of rashes, hay fever, or asthma.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• If you have an allergic history:
– Tell your health care provider before you accept any new drugs. Before you are given a shot, ask what it is.
– Keep a special kit, such as EpiPen, with you at all times. Be sure your family knows how to use the kit if you need it.
– If you are allergic to insect stings, wear clothing that covers all of your body when you are outside.
– Wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace warning that you have allergies.
– Always remain in a medical office 15 minutes after receiving any shot. Report any symptoms right away.
– Ask your health care provider about allergy therapy that can make you less allergic.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Full recovery (if treated quickly).

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
If not treated quickly, anaphylaxis can cause shock, cardiac arrest, and/or death.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• If you see signs of anaphylaxis in someone and they stop breathing:
– Call 911 (emergency) for an ambulance or medical help. If the victim is a child, perform lifesaving measures for 1 minute before calling for emergency help.
– Begin mouth-to-mouth breathing right away.
– If their heart is not beating, give CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation).
– Don’t stop CPR until help arrives.
• Be aware that a reaction may happen when taking any medicine. Be ready to respond quickly if symptoms develop. If you have had a severe allergic reaction in the past, always carry your anaphylaxis kit.
• Long-term treatment may involve steps to make your body less sensitive to things to which you are allergic.

MEDICATIONS

• Epinephrine shots are the only immediate treatment for this condition.
• Other drugs may be given after the epinephrine that will help prevent the return of symptoms.

ACTIVITY
Return to your normal activities as soon as symptoms are better. Make sure you are not alone for 24 hours, in case symptoms come back.

DIET
Avoid foods to which you are allergic.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has anaphylaxis symptoms. This is an emergency! Get help immediately!
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ANAFILAXIA (Choque Alergico) (Anaphylaxis [Allergic Shock]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La anafilaxia es una reacción alérgica a medicamentos o a otras sustancias (alérgenos) que puede poner en peligro la vida. Las reacciones que ocurren casi inmediatamente tienden a ser las más graves.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Segundos o minutos después de haber estado expuesto a cualquier sustancia a la cual es muy alérgico, puede sentir alguno de los siguientes síntomas:
– Hormigueo o entumecimiento alrededor de la boca
– Estornudos, tos o respiración sibilante
– Hinchazón de la cara o de las manos
– Sensación de ansiedad
– Pulso débil y rápido; palpitaciones fuertes
– Cólicos estomacales, vómito y diarrea
– Picazón en todo el cuerpo. A menudo aparece urticaria
– Lagrimeo
– Presión en el pecho; dificultad para respirar
– Hinchazón o picazón en la boca o la garganta
– Desfallecimiento; pérdida del conocimiento

CAUSAS

• Algunas veces el cuerpo sobrereacciona cuando trata de eliminar un material al cual es alérgico. Esto puede poner la vida en peligro. Algunos de los alérgenos que frecuentemente causan reacciones son:
– Medicamentos de todo tipo, especialmente la penicilina. Las inyecciones ofrecen un riesgo mayor que las gotas para los ojos o los medicamentos orales
– Picaduras o mordeduras de insectos o arácnidos, tales como abejas, avispas, avispones, hormigas y algunas arañas
– Vacunas
– Polen
– Productos químicos que se inyectan y se usan con ciertas radiografías
– Alimentos especialmente maníes, frutos secos de árboles (pecanos, nueces), huevos, leche, mariscos y pescado

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Haber tenido previamente una reacción alérgica leve a algunos de los alérgenos anteriormente nombrados bajo Causas.
• Antecedentes de erupciones, fiebre de heno o asma.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Si tiene antecedentes de alergias:
– Infórmele a su proveedor de atención médica antes de aceptar cualquier medicamento nuevo. Antes de que le pongan una inyección, pregunte de qué es
– Lleve siempre consigo un botiquín especial, tal como EpiPen. Asegúrese de que su familia sepa cómo utilizar dicho botiquín, en caso de que usted lo necesite
– Si es alérgico a picaduras de insecto, use ropa que cubra todo su cuerpo cuando esté afuera
– Lleve puesto un brazalete o collar de alerta médica con el aviso de sus alergias
– Después de haber recibido una inyección, espere por lo menos 15 minutos en el consultorio. Avise inmediatamente si siente algún síntoma
– Consulte a su proveedor de atención médica sobre terapias contra alergias para hacerlo menos alérgico

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Recuperación total (con tratamiento inmediato).

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Sin tratamiento inmediato, la anafilaxia puede causar choque, ataque cardiaco y/o la muerte.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Si nota que alguien muestra signos de anafilaxia y que para de respirar:
– Llame al 911 (emergencia) para pedir una ambulancia o ayuda médica. Si la víctima es un niño, adminístrele resucitación cardiopulmonar durante un minuto, antes de llamar para pedir ayuda
– Comience la respiración boca a boca inmediatamente
– Si el corazón no está palpitando, dele resucitación cardiopulmonar
– No deje de darle resucitación cardiopulmonar hasta que la ayuda llegue
• Esté alerta a la posibilidad de sufrir una reacción inesperada cuando tome cualquier medicamento. Prepárese para actuar rápidamente en el caso de que surjan síntomas. Si ha sufrido una reacción alérgica grave en el pasado, lleve siempre consigo el botiquín anafiláctico.
• El tratamiento a largo plazo puede incluir medidas para hacer el cuerpo menos sensible a cosas a las que es alérgico.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Epinefrina en inyecciones es el único tratamiento inmediato efectivo para esta condición.
• Le pueden dar otros medicamentos después de la epinefrina para ayudar a evitar que vuelvan los síntomas.

ACTIVIDAD
Reanude las actividades normales tan pronto como los síntomas mejoren. Asegúrese de no estar solo por 24 horas, en caso de que vuelvan los síntomas.

DIETA
Evite los alimentos que le causen alergias.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de anafilaxia. ¡Es un caso de emergencia! ¡Busque ayuda inmediata!
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ANEMIA DURING PREGNANCY

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Anemia during pregnancy is a low level of red cells and hemoglobin in the blood. Hemoglobin is the protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen. Common anemias in pregnancy include iron deficiency anemia and folate (folic acid) deficiency. Other anemias are glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, thalassemia, and sickle cell anemia.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Usually no symptoms are apparent.
• Fatigue, weakness, or fainting.
• Pale skin, gums, eyes, and nailbeds.
• Palpitations (awareness of the heartbeat).
• Shortness of breath with activity.

CAUSES

• The anemia usually results from an increased need for iron. Your body is making more blood so it needs more iron. Often the diet alone does not provide enough iron to meet the needs. Also, the growing baby takes all the iron it needs from you, no matter how much you have in your system.
• In some cases, anemia during pregnancy is due to a lack of folic acid or one of the B vitamins. It may also be caused by an inherited medical problem such as sickle cell anemia or thalassemia.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Women who are unable to eat well because of nausea or vomiting.
• Having a multiple pregnancy (e.g., twins) where iron stores are used up more quickly.
• Having two pregnancies fairly close together.
• Diet has insufficient iron content.
• A heavy menstrual flow in the months prior to the pregnancy.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Eat foods rich in iron, such as red meat, dried beans, whole-grain breads and cereals, eggs, or dried fruit.
• Eat foods high in folic acid, such as wheat germ, beans, peanut butter, oatmeal, mushrooms, collards, broccoli, and asparagus.
• Eat foods high in vitamin C, such as citrus fruits and fresh, raw vegetables.
• Take prenatal vitamin and mineral supplements, if they are prescribed.
• Get tested for certain anemias if you are at risk. Your obstetric provider will discuss the details.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Mild cases of anemia should cause no problems. Anemia can be treated with iron supplements or folic acid supplements.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• There may be some risk of preterm birth and low birth weight.
• Folic acid deficiency may cause birth defects (neural tube defects).

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your obstetric provider will do blood studies during your pregnancy. These can help diagnose anemia.
• Supplements may be prescribed.

MEDICATION

• Iron, folic acid, and other supplements may be prescribed. Take iron supplements 1 hour before eating or between meals. Iron can turn bowel movements black, and often causes constipation. Iron sometimes may be taken with meals if it has caused an upset stomach.
• If you are taking a calcium supplement in addition to an iron supplement, take them at different times of day, as calcium will interfere with iron absorption.

ACTIVITY
Rest often until the anemia improves.

DIET
Eat a healthy pregnancy diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member is pregnant and has symptoms of anemia.
• You have diarrhea, constipation, nausea, or abdominal pain during pregnancy.
• You have unexplained bleeding during pregnancy.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ANEMIA DURANTE EL EMBARAZO (Anemia During Pregnancy) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La anemia durante el embarazo es un nivel bajo de glóbulos rojos y hemoglobina en la sangre. La hemoglobina es la proteína que se encuentra dentro de los glóbulos rojos y que transporta oxígeno. Las anemias comunes en el embarazo incluyen anemia por deficiencia de hierro y deficiencia de ácido fólico. Otras anemias son por deficiencia de glucosa-6-fosfato deshidrogenasa (G6PD, por sus siglas en inglés), talasemia y anemia de células falciformes.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Usualmente no hay síntomas aparentes.
• Fatiga, debilidad o desvanecimiento.
• Palidez en la piel, las encías y el lecho de las uñas.
• Palpitaciones (estar consciente de los latidos del corazón).
• Falta de aliento con la actividad.

CAUSAS

• La anemia generalmente es el resultado de una mayor necesidad de hierro. Su cuerpo está produciendo más sangre de manera que necesita más hierro. A menudo la dieta sola no provee el hierro suficiente para cubrir las necesidades. Además, el bebé que está creciendo le saca a usted todo el hierro que necesita, sin importar cuánto tiene en su sistema.
• En algunos casos, la anemia durante el embarazo se debe a la falta de ácido fólico o de una de las vitaminas B. También puede ser el resultado de problemas médicos heredados como ser la anemia de células falciformes o la talasemia.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Mujeres que no se pueden alimentar bien debido a náusea o vómitos.
• Tener un embarazo múltiple (p. ej., mellizos) donde el hierro almacenado se usa más rápidamente.
• Tener dos embarazos muy seguidos.
• El contenido de hierro en la dieta es insuficiente.
• Flujos menstruales pesados en los meses anteriores al embarazo.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Coma alimentos ricos en hierro, tales como carnes rojas, frijoles secos, panes y cereales de granos enteros, huevos o frutas secas.
• Coma alimentos ricos en ácido fólico, tales como germen de trigo, frijoles, mantequilla de cacahuate, avena, champiñones, col rizada, brócoli y espárragos.
• Coma alimentos ricos en vitamina C, tales como frutas cítricas y verduras frescas crudas.
• Si se lo recetan, tome vitaminas prenatales y suplementos minerales.
• Hágase examinar para ciertas anemias si está en riesgo. Su ginecólogo discutirá los detalles.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Los casos moderados de anemia no deben causar problemas. La anemia se puede tratar con suplementos de hierro y ácido fólico.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Puede haber cierto riesgo de un parto prematuro y bajo peso del bebé al nacer.
• La deficiencia de ácido fólico puede causar defectos de nacimiento (defectos del tubo neural).

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su ginecólogo hará análisis de sangre durante el embarazo. Esto puede ayudar a diagnosticar la anemia.
• Se le pueden prescribir suplementos.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se pueden recetar suplementos de hierro, ácido fólico u otros. Tome los suplementos de hierro 1 hora antes de comer o entre comidas. El hierro puede volver negro el excremento y con frecuencia causa estreñimiento. El hierro puede tomarse con comida algunas veces si le afecta el estómago.
• Si está tomando un suplemento de calcio adicionalmente al suplemento de hierro, tómelo a diferentes horas del día, porque el calcio interfiere con la absorción de hierro.

ACTIVIDAD
Descansar frecuentemente hasta que la anemia desaparezca.

DIETA
Coma una dieta saludable.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia está embarazada y tiene síntomas de anemia.
• Tiene diarrea, estreñimiento, náusea o dolor abdominal durante el embarazo.
• Usted tiene sangrado inexplicable durante el embarazo.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ANEMIA, HEMOLYTIC

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Hemolytic anemia is due to red blood cells being destroyed faster than the bone marrow can produce them. In the intrinsic type, the destruction is due to a defect in the red blood cells themselves. In the extrinsic type, healthy red blood cells are produced, but are destroyed in the spleen. This anemia can affect all ages.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Sometimes there are no symptoms. The anemia may be diagnosed on a routine health exam.
• Fatigue and weakness.
• Pale skin, eyes, and fingernails.
• Shortness of breath.
• Irregular heartbeat.
• Jaundice (yellow skin and eyes, dark urine).

CAUSES
Bone marrow cannot produce red blood cells fast enough to make up for those being destroyed. This is a process known as hemolysis. More than 200 causes for hemolysis exist. Some are due to inherited disorders and some are acquired disorders. Sometimes, the cause is unknown.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Inherited disorders. These include hereditary spherocytosis, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, sickle cell anemia, or thalassemia.
• Infections such as hepatitis, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, typhoid fever, streptococcus, or Escherichia coli (E. coli) .
• Leukemia or lymphoma.
• Use of certain drugs, such as penicillin, antimalarials, sulfa, or acetaminophen.
• Various tumors.
• Family history of hemolytic anemia.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Don’t take any drugs that have previously caused hemolytic anemia.
• Seek genetic counseling before having children if you have a family history of inherited hemolytic anemia.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• If hemolytic anemia is acquired, it can usually be cured when the cause, such as a drug, is stopped.
• If it is due to an underlying disorder, the outcome depends on the course of the primary disease.
• If hemolytic anemia is inherited, it is currently considered incurable. However, symptoms can be relieved or controlled.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Varies depending on the cause of the anemia.
• It may cause existing heart or lung disease to worsen.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms. Medical tests include blood and urine studies. Other tests may be done to help diagnose an underlying cause for anemia.
• Treatment depends on the specific hemolytic problem. Treatment may include drugs, blood transfusions, stopping drugs, or surgery.
• Blood transfusion therapy may be needed.
• Surgical removal of the spleen may be recommended.

MEDICATIONS

• Drugs will be prescribed depending on the specific cause of anemia. These may include corticosteroids, immune globulin, folic acid, iron therapy, and others.
• Drugs that are causing the anemia will be stopped.

ACTIVITY
No limits, except those caused by the symptoms.

DIET
No special diet. Fava beans should be avoided in certain patients (you will be advised).

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of hemolytic anemia.
• Fever, cough, sore throat, swollen joints, muscle aches, or bloody urine occur during treatment.
• Signs of infection occur in any part of the body (redness, pain, swelling, fever).
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ANEMIA HEMOLITICA (Anemia, Hemolytic) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La anemia hemolítica se debe a que los glóbulos rojos son destruidos más rápidamente que lo que la médula ósea puede producirlos. En el tipo intrínseco, la destrucción se debe a un defecto en los glóbulos rojos. En el tipo extrínseco, se producen glóbulos rojos saludables, pero son destruidos en el bazo. Este tipo de anemia puede afectar a personas a de todas las edades.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• A veces no hay síntomas. La anemia puede diagnosticarse en un examen rutinario.
• Fatiga y debilidad.
• Palidez en la piel, ojos y uñas.
• Falta de aliento.
• Ritmo cardiaco irregular.
• Ictericia (piel y ojos amarillos, orina oscura).

CAUSAS
La médula ósea no puede producir glóbulos rojos los suficientemente rápido para compensar por aquellos que están siendo destruidos. Este es un proceso conocido como hemólisis. Existen más de 200 causas de la hemólisis. Algunas son debido a trastornos heredados y otras son por trastornos adquiridos. A veces, la causa es desconocida.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Trastornos heredados. Estos incluyen esferocitosis hereditaria, deficiencia de glucosa-6-fosfato deshidrogenasa (G6PD), anemia de células falciformes o talasemia.
• Infecciones tales como hepatitis, citomegalovirus, virus de Epstein-Barr, fiebre tifoidea, estreptococo o Escherichia coli (E. coli).
• Leucemia o linfoma.
• Uso de ciertos medicamentos, tales como penicilina, medicamentos antimalaria, sulfa o paracetamol (acetaminofén).
• Varios tumores.
• Antecedentes familiares de anemia hemolítica.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• No tome medicamentos que hayan causado anemia hemolítica anteriormente.
• Busque asesoría genética antes de tener hijos si tiene antecedentes familiares de anemia hemolítica hereditaria.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• Si la anemia hemolítica es adquirida, generalmente puede ser curada cuando la causa, tal como un medicamento, se elimina.
• Si se debe a un trastorno subyacente, el pronóstico depende del curso de la enfermedad primaria.
• Si la anemia hemolítica es hereditaria, actualmente se considera incurable. Sin embargo, los síntomas pueden ser aliviados o controlados.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Varía dependiendo de la causa de la anemia.
• Puede hacer que empeore una enfermedad cardiaca o pulmonar existente.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir análisis de sangre y orina. Pueden hacerse otros exámenes para ayudar a diagnosticar la causa subyacente de la anemia.
• El tratamiento depende del problema hemolítico específico. El tratamiento puede incluir medicamentos, transfusiones de sangre, medicamentos de detención o cirugía.
• Puede ser necesaria la terapia de transfusiones de sangre.
• Se puede recomendar la extirpación quirúrgica del bazo.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se recetarán medicamentos dependiendo de la causa específica de la anemia. Estos pueden incluir corticosteroides, inmunoglobulina (anticuerpos), ácido fólico, terapia de hierro y otros.
• Se detendrá el uso de medicamentos que causan la anemia.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin restricciones, excepto las causadas por los síntomas.

DIETA
Ninguna dieta en especial. Las fabáceas deben evitarse en algunos pacientes (se le aconsejará).

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia presenta síntomas de anemia hemolítica.
• Padece de fiebre, tos, dolor de garganta, articulaciones hinchadas, dolores musculares u orina con sangre durante el tratamiento.
• Presenta síntomas de infección en cualquier parte del cuerpo (enrojecimiento, dolor, hinchazón, fiebre).
• Aparecen síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ANEMIA, IRON-DEFICIENCY

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
An anemia caused by inadequate amounts of iron, which is required to meet the body’s needs. Iron is present in all cells and has several vital functions. The anemia can affect any age. It is more common in women of childbearing age.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• There may be no symptoms. It may be diagnosed on a routine health exam.
• Fatigue and weakness.
• Pale skin, eyes, and fingernails.
• General feeling of discomfort.
• Being more sensitive to cold.
• Shortness of breath.
• Dizziness.
• Restless leg syndrome (odd sensations in the legs).

CAUSES
Iron is involved with red blood cell production. When iron stores are low, fewer red blood cells are produced and this leads to anemia.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Rapid growth spurts in children and young teens.
• Heavy menstrual bleeding.
• Pregnancy.
• Not getting enough iron in the diet.
• Internal bleeding, such as from ulcers or colon polyps.
• Problems of the body in utilizing or absorbing iron.
• Kidney disease.
• Folic acid or vitamin B-12 deficiency.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Adequate iron intake with a well-balanced diet.
• Correct problems causing excess blood loss.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Usually curable with treatment. It may take 2 months for the iron levels to return to normal. Some outcomes will also depend on the underlying cause.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Complications are rare in mild anemia.
• If the anemia is more severe, heart complications can occur. Children may have developmental problems.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms and diet. Medical tests may include blood, urine, and stool studies. Other tests may be done to diagnose disorders that could be the cause of the anemia.
• Iron deficiency can be treated with iron supplements. Other treatment will depend on the underlying cause. The cause needs to be treated so the iron deficiency does not recur.
• Internal bleeding problems may require surgery.

MEDICATIONS

• Oral iron supplements (always follow your health care provider’s instructions):
– Take iron on an empty stomach (at least 1/2 hour before meals) for best absorption. If it upsets your stomach, take it with a small amount of food (except milk).
– If you take other drugs, wait at least 2 hours after taking iron before taking them. Antacids, tetracyclines, allopurinol, and vitamin E especially interfere with iron absorption.
– Iron supplements may cause black bowel movements, diarrhea, or constipation.
– Too much iron is dangerous. A bottle of iron tablets can poison a child. Keep iron supplements out of the reach of children.
• In some cases, the iron may be given by injection.

ACTIVITY
No limits. You may need to reduce activities until symptoms of fatigue are gone.

DIET

• Eat iron-rich foods, including meat, fish, poultry, beans, raisins, egg yolks, and leafy green vegetables.
• Increase dietary fiber to prevent constipation.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of anemia.
• Nausea, vomiting, fever, stomach pain, constipation, or severe diarrhea occur during treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ANEMIA POR DEFICIENCIA DE HIERRO (Anemia, Iron-Deficiency) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La anemia es causada por cantidades inadecuadas de hierro, el cual es necesario para satisfacer las necesidades del cuerpo. El hierro está presente en todas las células y tiene varias funciones vitales. La anemia puede afectar a personas de todas las edades, pero es más común en las mujeres en sus años fértiles.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Puede ser que no haya síntomas. Puede ser diagnosticada en un examen de salud rutinario.
• Fatiga y debilidad.
• Palidez de la piel, de los ojos y de las uñas de las manos.
• Sensación de malestar general.
• Mayor sensibilidad al frío.
• Falta de aliento.
• Mareos.
• Síndrome de piernas inquietas (sensaciones extrañas en las piernas).

CAUSAS
El hierro está asociado con la producción de glóbulos rojos en la sangre. Cuando las reservas de hierro son bajas, menos glóbulos rojos son producidos, lo que conduce a la anemia.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Periodos de crecimiento acelerado en niños y adolescentes.
• Sangrado menstrual copioso.
• Embarazo.
• No ingerir suficiente hierro en la dieta.
• Sangrado interno, tal como el causado por úlceras y pólipos en el colon.
• Problemas del cuerpo para utilizar o absorber el hierro.
• Enfermedad renal.
• Deficiencia de ácido fólico o vitamina B-12.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Consuma una cantidad adecuada de hierro con una dieta bien equilibrada.
• Corrija los problemas que causan pérdida excesiva de hierro.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Generalmente curable con tratamiento. Puede tomar hasta 2 meses para que los niveles de hierro regresen a lo normal. En algunos casos, los resultados dependerán de la causa subyacente.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Las complicaciones son raras en la anemia leve.
• Si la anemia es más severa, pueden ocurrir complicaciones cardiacas. Los niños pueden tener problemas de desarrollo.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas y la dieta. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir análisis de sangre, orina y heces. Se pueden hacer otros exámenes para diagnosticar trastornos que puedan ser la causa de la anemia.
• La deficiencia de hierro puede tratarse con suplementos de hierro. Otros tratamientos dependerán de la causa subyacente. La causa necesita tratarse para que la deficiencia de hierro no vuelva a ocurrir.
• Los problemas de sangrado interno pueden necesitar cirugía.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Suplementos de hierro orales (siempre siga las instrucciones del proveedor de atención médica):
– Para absorberlo mejor, tome el hierro con el estómago vacío (por lo menos media hora antes de las comidas). Si le causa molestias en el estómago, tómelo con un poquito de comida (pero nunca con leche).
– Si está tomando otros medicamentos, espere por lo menos 2 horas, después de haber tomado el hierro, para tomarlos. Especialmente los antiácidos, las tetraciclinas, el allopurinol y la vitamina E interfieren en la absorción del hierro.
– Los suplementos de hierro pueden causar deposiciones negras, diarrea o estreñimiento.
– Demasiado hierro es peligroso. Una botella de pastillas de hierro puede envenenar a un niño. Guarde este medicamento lejos del alcance de los niños.
• En algunos casos, el hierro puede inyectarse.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin restricciones. Puede que tenga que reducir las actividades hasta que los síntomas de fatiga desaparezcan.

DIETA

• Coma alimentos ricos en hierro, incluyendo carne, pescado, aves, frijoles, pasas, yemas de huevo y verduras de hoja verde.
• Para prevenir el estreñimiento coma más alimentos ricos en fibra.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de anemia.
• Durante el tratamiento tiene náusea, vómito, fiebre, dolor de estómago, estreñimiento o diarrea grave.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ANEMIA, PERNICIOUS (Vitamin B-12 Deficiency)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Pernicious anemia results from the failure of the digestive tract to absorb vitamin B-12. Vitamin B-12 (also called cobalamin) is needed for making red blood cells and keeping the nervous system functioning. This type of anemia usually affects adults of both sexes, between ages 40 and 70.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Symptoms develop slowly. It may take time to notice.
• Weakness, especially in the arms and legs.
• Bright red, smooth, burning, or sore tongue.
• Numbness or tingling in the hands and feet.
• Difficulty maintaining proper balance and walking.
• Loss of sense of position, especially in a dark room.
• Nausea, appetite loss, and weight loss.
• Low-grade fever.
• Constipation or diarrhea.
• Pale or yellowish skin.
• Bleeding gums and mouth sores.
• Shortness of breath, chest pain, rapid heartbeat.
• Depression, confusion, poor memory, and dementia.

CAUSES

• Pernicious anemia is due to a lack of intrinsic factor. This is a substance made by cells in the stomach that makes it possible to absorb vitamin B-12. The reason for the lack of intrinsic factor is unknown. It may be an autoimmune reaction, a genetic factor, or both.
• Other vitamin B-12 deficiency-caused anemias may be due to a variety of factors.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Stomach surgery, stomach cancer, or gastritis.
• Diabetes and autoimmune disorders.
• Myxedema, Graves— disease, other thyroid disorders.
• Genetic factors, such as in people of Northern European ancestry. It is rare in blacks and Asians.
• Family history of pernicious anemia.
• Strict vegetarian diet or infants breast-fed by a mother on a strict vegetarian diet.
• Lack of stomach acid in older adults.
• Parasitic infections and intestinal diseases.
• Drugs such as H2 blockers, proton pump inhibitors, colchicine, neomycin, and aminosalicylic acid.
• Poor diet, such as due to alcoholism or aging.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Pernicious anemia cannot be prevented. In other anemias, avoiding risk factors, where possible, may help.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• For pernicious anemia, lifelong vitamin B-12 therapy will help symptoms and prevent complications.
• For vitamin B-12 deficiency-caused anemia, vitamin B-12 therapy or diet changes can prevent deficiency.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Congestive heart failure.
• Nerve damage that cannot be reversed.
• Gastric cancer.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms and your diet. Medical tests include blood tests for vitamin B-12 levels, to check for antibodies to the intrinsic factor, and to measure the body’s ability to absorb vitamin B-12.
• Treatment usually involves vitamin B-12 replacement. Lifetime treatment is needed for pernicious anemia. Some symptoms should start to clear up in a few days after treatment begins, while others may take several months.
• Any underlying disorder (such as thyroid problems) will be treated also.

MEDICATIONS

• Vitamin B-12 replacement will be prescribed. Some patients are given injections (they can be self-administered). For other patients (or in addition to injections), the vitamin may be taken by mouth or as a nasal gel.
• Iron supplements may be prescribed.
• Avoid taking high amounts of folic acid. It can mask the signs of vitamin B-12 deficiency.

ACTIVITY
Activity may be limited until symptoms improve.

DIET

• Eat a well-balanced diet.
• People on strict vegetarian diets can change the diet or take vitamin B-12 supplements for life.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of pernicious anemia.
• Symptoms don’t start to improve with treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ANEMIA PERNICIOSA (Deficiencia de Vitamina B-12) (Anemia, Pernicious [Vitamin B-12 Deficiency]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La anemia perniciosa es el resultado de la falla del tracto digestivo en absorber la vitamina B-12 (también llamada cianocobalamina). Esta vitamina es necesaria para formar los glóbulos rojos y para mantener el sistema nervioso funcionando. Este tipo de anemia generalmente afecta a adultos de ambos sexos, entre las edades de 40 y 70 años.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Los síntomas se desarrollan lentamente. Puede tomar tiempo en ser detectada.
• Debilidad, especialmente en los brazos y en las piernas.
• Lengua de color rojo brillante, lisa, ardiente o adolorida.
• Adormecimiento o cosquilleo en las manos y en los pies.
• Dificultad para mantener un equilibrio apropiado y para andar.
• Pérdida del sentido de la posición donde está, especialmente en una habitación oscura.
• Náusea, pérdida de apetito y de peso.
• Fiebre baja.
• Estreñimiento o diarrea.
• Piel pálida o amarillenta.
• Sangrado de las encías y úlceras bucales.
• Falta de aliento, dolor de pecho, latidos rápidos del corazón.
• Depresión, confusión, memoria pobre y demencia.

CAUSAS

• La anemia perniciosa se debe a la falta del factor intrínseco. ésta es una sustancia hecha por las células del estómago que hace posible la absorción de la vitamina B-12. La razón de la falta del factor intrínseco es desconocida. Puede ser una reacción autoinmune, un factor genético o ambos.
• Otras anemias causadas por deficiencia de vitamina B-12 pueden ser por una variedad de factores.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Cirugía del estómago, cáncer del estómago o gastritis.
• Diabetes o trastornos autoinmunes.
• Mixedema, enfermedad de Graves u otros trastornos de la tiroides.
• Factores genéticos, tales como en personas descendientes del norte de Europa. Es rara en personas de la raza negra y los asiáticos.
• Antecedentes familiares de anemia perniciosa.
• Dieta estrictamente vegetariana o infantes lactados por una madre en una dieta estrictamente vegetariana.
• Falta de ácido estomacal en adultos mayores.
• Infecciones parasíticas y enfermedades de los intestinos.
• Medicamentos tales como bloqueadores H2, inhibidores de la bomba de protón, colchicina, neomicina y ácido aminosalicílico.
• Mala dieta, como ser debido al alcoholismo o envejecimiento.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
La anemia perniciosa no se puede prevenir. En las otras anemias, el evitar los factores de riesgo cuando sea posible puede ayudar.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• Para la anemia perniciosa, la terapia con vitamina B-12 de por vida ayudará a los síntomas y ayudará a prevenir las complicaciones.
• Para la anemia causada por deficiencia de vitamina B-12, la terapia con vitamina B-12 o cambios en la dieta pueden prevenir la deficiencia.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Insuficiencia cardíaca congestiva.
• Daño a los nervios que no puede ser revertido.
• Cáncer gástrico.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará sobre sus síntomas y su dieta. Los exámenes médicos incluyen un análisis de sangre para medir los niveles de vitamina B-12, para examinar los anticuerpos contra el factor intrínseco y para medir la habilidad corporal para absorber la vitamina B-12.
• Generalmente, el tratamiento requiere reemplazo de vitamina B-12. Un tratamiento por toda la vida es necesario para la anemia perniciosa. Algunos síntomas debieran comenzar a desaparecer después de unos días de iniciar el tratamiento, mientras otros pueden tomar varios meses.
• Otros trastornos subyacentes (tales como problemas de tiroides) también serán tratados.

MEDICAMENTOS

• El reemplazo de vitamina B-12 será recetado. Algunos pacientes la recibirán por inyección (el mismo paciente puede administrárselas). Para otros pacientes (o en adición a las inyecciones), la vitamina puede ser ingerida por vía oral o como un gel nasal.
• Suplementos de hierro pueden ser recetados.
• Evite consumir cantidades elevadas de ácido fólico. Esto puede opacar los signos de deficiencia de vitamina B-12.

ACTIVIDAD
La actividad puede ser limitada hasta que los síntomas mejoren.

DIETA

• Consuma una dieta equilibrada.
• Las personas en una dieta estrictamente vegetariana pueden cambiar la dieta o tomar suplementos de vitamina B-12 de por vida.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia presenta los síntomas de anemia perniciosa.
• Los síntomas no comienzan a mejorar con el tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ANEURYSM

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
An aneurysm is a ballooning or bulge in the wall of a blood vessel (almost always an artery). It can affect the arteries in the chest, abdomen, brain, legs, or heart wall. Aneurysms have thin, weak walls and have a tendency to rupture (burst) and cause hemorrhage (bleeding). They occur most often in adults over age 55.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Often, no symptoms occur unless the aneurysm ruptures. Symptoms that occur depend on affected artery.
• Thoracic (chest) aneurysm produces pain in the chest, neck, back, and abdomen. The pain may be sudden and sharp.
• Cerebral aneurysm in a brain artery produces headache (often throbbing), weakness, paralysis or numbness, pain behind the eye, vision change, partial blindness, and eye pupils of different sizes.
• Abdominal aneurysm produces back pain (sometimes severe), abdomen pain, and groin pain.
• Peripheral aneurysm in a leg artery causes poor circulation in the leg, with weakness and paleness or swelling, and bluish color.
• Ventricular aneurysm in the wall of the heart causes irregular heartbeat, shortness of breath, and chest pain.

CAUSES
Arterial walls become weak due to defect, disease, or injury. This may be due to an acquired condition or it may be congenital (present at birth).

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Adults over 55.
• Family history of aneurysms.
• Atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries).
• High blood pressure.
• Congenital weak artery.
• Polycystic disease or connective tissue disorders.
• Complications of blood infections.
• Fibromuscular dysplasia.
• Injury (trauma).
• Cigarette smoking.
• Emphysema.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
No specific way to prevent aneurysms. Seek treatment for any risk factors where possible.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• Diagnosed, unruptured aneurysms may or may not be treated. You may be followed up with regular medical exams to watch for complications.
• Outcome of a ruptured aneurysm varies. Some persons are treated and recover with little or no damage. Others die before, during, or after treatment.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Stroke.
• Rupture of the aneurysm.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Emergency treatment is needed for persons with symptoms of a ruptured aneurysm. Once the aneurysm is diagnosed, surgery may be performed. This is done to stop any bleeding and to prevent the aneurysm from recurring. Treatments called endovascular procedures can be done to plug or clog the blood vessel.
• Unruptured aneurysms may be diagnosed when a person has no symptoms. Sometimes they are found when medical tests are done for other reasons. The decision to treat or not treat these aneurysms with surgery is difficult. Both options carry risks. Your health care provider will discuss the risks and benefits of each with you. The size of the aneurysm, its location, the patient’s symptoms, age, health status, and preferences must all be considered.
• Sometimes, the aneurysm can be removed and replaced with a graft (artificial blood vessel), or wrapped with a protective sleeve to prevent rupturing.
• To learn more: Search the Internet or visit a library.

MEDICATIONS

• After surgery, anticoagulants to prevent blood clots and pain relievers are usually prescribed.
• Antibiotics to prevent infection may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY
If surgery is done, you will be advised of any limits.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of a ruptured aneurysm. This is an emergency! Call for help; rest in bed until help arrives.
• You or a family member has minor pain or aching in the chest, abdomen, or legs. Fever or weight loss occurs for no apparent reason.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ANEURISMA (Aneurysm) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Un aneurisma es una dilatación o abultamiento en una pared de un vaso sanguíneo (casi siempre una arteria). Puede afectar las arterias del pecho, abdomen, cerebro, piernas o la pared del corazón. Los aneurismas tienen paredes finas y débiles, que tienen la tendencia a romperse (explotar) y causar una hemorragia (sangrado). Esto ocurre con más frecuencia en adultos mayores de 55 años.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• A menudo, no hay síntomas a menos que el aneurisma se rompa. Los síntomas que ocurren dependen de la arteria afectada.
• El aneurisma torácico (en el pecho) produce dolor en el pecho, en el cuello, la espalda y el abdomen. El dolor puede ser súbito y agudo.
• El aneurisma cerebral en una arteria del cerebro produce dolor de cabeza (frecuentemente palpitante), debilidad, parálisis o entumecimiento, dolor detrás de un ojo, cambios en la vista o ceguera parcial y pupilas desiguales.
• El aneurisma abdominal produce dolor de espalda (algunas veces fuerte), dolor del abdomen y de la ingle.
• El aneurisma periférico en una arteria de la pierna causa mala circulación en la pierna, con debilidad, palidez o hinchazón con un color azulado.
• El aneurisma ventricular en las paredes del corazón causa pulso irregular, falta de aliento y dolor de pecho.

CAUSAS
Las paredes arteriales se debilitan debido a un defecto, una enfermedad o una lesión. Esto puede ser debido a una condición adquirida o congénita (presente desde el nacimiento).

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Adultos mayores de 55 años.
• Antecedentes familiares de aneurisma.
• Aterosclerosis (endurecimiento de las arterias).
• Presión arterial elevada.
• Arterias débiles congénitas.
• Enfermedad poliquística o trastornos de los tejidos conectivos.
• Complicaciones con infecciones sanguíneas.
• Displasia fibromuscular.
• Lesión (trauma).
• Fumar cigarrillos.
• Enfisema.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No hay medidas preventivas específicas para prevenir aneurismas. Busque tratamiento para cualquier factor de riesgo cuando sea posible.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• Después del diagnóstico, el aneurisma sin rotura puede o no tratarse. Su proveedor de atención médica puede pedirle exámenes médicos regulares para detectar posibles complicaciones.
• El pronóstico del aneurisma con rotura varía. Algunas personas son tratadas y se recuperan sin ningún o con poco daño. Otras mueren antes, durante o después del tratamiento.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Apoplejía.
• Ruptura del aneurisma.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Se necesita tratamiento de emergencia para personas con síntomas de aneurisma con rotura. Una vez que el aneurisma es diagnosticado, puede hacerse la cirugía. Esta se hace para detener el sangrado y prevenir que el aneurisma vuelva a ocurrir. Los tratamientos llamados procedimientos endovasculares pueden hacerse para tapar u obstruir el vaso sanguíneo.
• El aneurisma sin rotura puede diagnosticarse cuando la persona no tiene síntomas. Algunas veces se encuentra cuando se hacen exámenes médicos por otras razones. La decisión de tratar o no estos aneurismas con cirugía es difícil. Ambas decisiones conllevan riesgos. Su proveedor de atención médica discutirá los riesgos y beneficios de cada una con usted. El tamaño y la localización del aneurisma, así como los síntomas, la edad, la condición de salud y las preferencias del paciente deben ser considerados.
• Algunas veces, el aneurisma puede ser removido y reemplazado con un injerto (un vaso sanguíneo artificial) o envuelto con una manga protectora para evitar la rotura.
• Para obtener más información, haga una búsqueda en la Internet o visite la biblioteca.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Después de la cirugía, generalmente se recetan anticoagulantes, para prevenir los coágulos sanguíneos, y analgésicos.
• Pueden recetarse antibióticos para prevenir una infección.

ACTIVIDAD
Si lo operan, le dirán cuales son las limitaciones a seguir.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de aneurisma con rotura. ¡Esto es una emergencia! Pida ayuda y permanezca en cama hasta que reciba asistencia.
• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene dolor leve en el pecho, el abdomen o las piernas. Fiebre o pérdida de peso ocurre sin ninguna razón aparente.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ANGINA PECTORIS

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Angina pectoris is chest pain or discomfort due to a decrease in the blood (and oxygen) supply to the heart muscle (myocardium). Angina may be stable (symptoms are predictable), or unstable (symptoms are unexpected and usually occur while at rest). Angina affects adults of both sexes.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Tightness, squeezing, pressure, fullness, ache, or pain in the center of the chest. Pain may feel like indigestion.
• Discomfort or pain may also occur in the neck, jaw, shoulder, arm, or back.
• Symptoms may occur with exercise, strong emotions, heavy meals, or with temperature extremes. Some persons have angina while resting.

CAUSES
Angina occurs when the heart needs more blood and oxygen and is unable to get what it requires. This is called ischemia. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the main cause. In CAD, one or more of the arteries supplying blood to the heart is narrowed or blocked. Angina also occurs if the blood does not carry enough oxygen.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• High blood pressure, atherosclerosis, diabetes, high cholesterol, personal or family history of heart disease.
• Obesity, inactivity, smoking, or excess alcohol use.
• Metabolic syndrome (a group of risk factors).

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Prevention involves preventing the coronary artery disease that leads to angina. Don’t smoke. Get treatment for chronic disorders such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and obesity. Exercise regularly. Reduce high cholesterol with diet or drugs.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Most angina symptoms can be relieved with lifestyle changes and/or drug therapy. Other treatment may be needed to correct underlying diseases.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
Heart attack, unstable angina, and/or death.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms. A number of medical tests will be done to assess heart function and to diagnose any underlying disorder.
• Treatment usually involves drug therapy to relieve angina symptoms, slow the progress of heart disease, and prevent complications.
• If drugs cannot control the angina, there are other treatment options. They include balloon angioplasty to open blocked coronary arteries, stenting (a tiny metal tube or coil is placed in the artery to keep it open), or surgery to bypass severely blocked coronary arteries.
• Don’t smoke. Find a way to quit that works for you.
• Avoid angina triggers, if possible, that increase the heart’s workload, such as anger, temperature extremes, high altitude (except in commercial airline flights), or sudden bursts of activity.
• To learn more: American Heart Association, local branch listed in telephone directory, or call (800) 242-8721; website: www.americanheart.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Nitroglycerin relieves acute symptoms of angina or it can be used before activities. It does not affect symptoms of other disorders. It can work within seconds to relieve pain. Keep it with you for immediate use.
• Drugs to prevent blood clots will be given after procedures such as balloon angioplasty or stenting.
• Other drugs for coronary disease, such as aspirin, beta-blockers, cholesterol-lowering drugs, ACE inhibitors, or calcium channel blockers may be prescribed. If they are, it is important to follow the prescribed drug regimen.

ACTIVITY

• Learn to adjust activities to lessen angina attacks.
• Don’t use angina as an excuse not to exercise. A regular moderate exercise routine (determined by your health care provider) can help to control symptoms.

DIET

• Low-fat, low-cholesterol diet is often recommended.
• Weight loss diet if overweight.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of angina pectoris.
• Angina pain lasts longer than 10 to 15 minutes, despite rest and treatment with nitroglycerin.
• You wake from sleep with chest pain that does not go away with 1 nitroglycerin tablet. If these attacks continue, report them, even if nitroglycerin relieves them.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ANGINA DE PECHO (Angina Pectoris) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La angina del pecho es un dolor o molestia en el pecho debido a una disminución en el suministro de sangre (y oxígeno) al músculo del corazón (miocardio). La angina puede ser estable (los síntomas son predecibles) o inestable (los síntomas son inesperados y suelen ocurrir mientras se descansa). La angina afecta a personas adultas de ambos sexos.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Sensación de opresión, tensión, presión, llenura, dolor moderado o agudo en el centro del pecho. El dolor se puede sentir como una indigestión.
• Molestia o dolor pueden ocurrir también en el cuello, la mandíbula, el hombro, el brazo o la espalda.
• Los síntomas pueden suceder con el ejercicio, emociones fuertes, una comida pesada o con temperaturas extremas. Algunas personas sufren de angina mientras descansan.

CAUSAS
La angina ocurre cuando el corazón necesita más sangre y oxígeno, y no puede obtener lo que le hace falta. Esto se llama isquemia. Enfermedad de las arterias coronarias (CAD, por sus siglas en inglés) es la causa principal. En la CAD, una o más de las arterias que suministran sangre al corazón están parcialmente o totalmente obstruidas. La angina también ocurre si la sangre no lleva suficiente oxígeno.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Alta presión arterial, aterosclerosis, diabetes, colesterol elevado, antecedentes personales o familiares de enfermedades al corazón.
• Obesidad, inactividad, fumar o excesivo consumo de alcohol.
• Síndrome metabólico (un grupo de factores de riesgo).

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
La prevención incluye evitar la enfermedad de las arterias coronarias que lleva a la angina. No fume. Obtenga tratamiento para trastornos crónicos tales como la diabetes, presión arterial elevada y obesidad. Haga ejercicios con regularidad. Reduzca el nivel elevado de colesterol con dieta o medicamentos.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
La mayoría de los síntomas de angina se pueden aliviar con cambios del estilo de vida y/o terapia de medicamentos. Puede ser necesario otro tipo de tratamiento para corregir las enfermedades subyacentes.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Ataque al corazón.
• Angina inestable y/o la muerte.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica hará un examen físico y preguntará acerca de los síntomas. Se harán varios exámenes médicos para evaluar la función del corazón y para diagnosticar cualquier problema subyacente.
• El tratamiento generalmente incluye terapia de medicamentos para aliviar los síntomas de la angina, retrasar el progreso de la enfermedad del corazón y evitar las complicaciones.
• Si la angina no se puede controlar con medicamentos, existen otras opciones de tratamiento. Estas incluyen la angioplastia de balón para abrir las arterias coronarias obstruidas, stenting (se coloca un tubo pequeño de metal o un anillo en la arteria para mantenerla abierta), o cirugía de baipás (bypass, o desviación coronaria) para circunvalar las arterias coronarias severamente obstruidas.
• No fume. Encuentre una manera de dejar de fumar que funcione para usted.
• Evite las situaciones que provocan angina, al aumentar la carga de trabajo del corazón, si es posible, tales como enojos, temperaturas extremas, altitud (excepto en aviones de aerolíneas comerciales) o arranques súbitos de actividad.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: American Heart Association; busque el número telefónico de la oficina local en el directorio telefónico o llame al (800) 242-8721; sitio web: www.americanheart.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• La nitroglicerina alivia los síntomas agudos de la angina o se puede tomar antes de las actividades físicas. No afecta los síntomas de otras enfermedades. Puede aliviar el dolor en segundos. Téngala a mano para su uso inmediato.
• Después de procedimientos como la angioplastia de balón o stenting, se le administrarán medicamentos para prevenir los coágulos de sangre .
• Medicamentos para prevenir los coágulos de sangre serán dados después de procedimientos como angioplastia de balón y stenting.
• Se pueden recetar otros medicamentos para la enfermedad de las arterias coronarias, tales como aspirina, bloqueadores beta, medicamentos para bajar el nivel de colesterol, inhibidores del extracto adrenocortical o antagonistas del calcio. Si se los recetan, es importante seguir su plan de medicación recetado.

ACTIVIDAD

• Aprenda a adaptar sus actividades para reducir los ataques.
• No use la angina como excusa para no hacer ejercicio. Un plan de ejercicio regular moderado (establecido por el proveedor de atención médica) puede ayudarle a controlar los síntomas.

DIETA

• Se recomienda una dieta baja en grasas y colesterol.
• Una dieta de pérdida de peso si tiene sobrepeso.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de angina de pecho.
• El dolor de la angina dura más de 10 a 15 minutos, a pesar de descansar y del tratamiento con nitroglicerina.
• Se despierta con dolor de pecho que no se le quita con una pastilla de nitroglicerina. Si los ataques continúan, avísele al proveedor de atención médica, aunque se alivie con nitroglicerina.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ANIMAL BITES

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Animal bites are bite wounds to humans from dogs, cats, or other animals (including humans).

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Bite wounds can be tears, punctures, scratches, ripping, or crushing injuries.
• Dog bites usually involve the hands, face, or the legs and feet.
• Cat bites usually involve the hands, followed by legs, feet, face, and trunk.

CAUSES

• Most bite wounds are from a domestic pet known to the victim. Large dogs are the most common source.
• Human bites are often the result of one person striking another in the mouth with a clenched fist.

RISK INCREASES WITH
Exposure to domestic pets or wild animals.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Education on how to avoid animal bites, for children as well as adults.
• Avoid stray animals.
• To prevent complications from possible animal bites, keep tetanus immunizations up-to-date.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• Wounds should steadily improve and close over within 7 to 10 days.
• Dog bites rarely become infected. Cat bites and human bites frequently become infected.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
Infection, extensive soft tissue injuries with scarring, hemorrhage, rabies, and sometimes death.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Call 911 if a person has been seriously wounded or is bleeding heavily.
• For first aid:
– Wash hands before and after caring for the wound.
– If the wound is bleeding, apply pressure to the area with clean towel or cloth until bleeding stops. Clean wound with soap and water, dry the area, apply an antibiotic ointment, and cover it with sterile gauze or clean cloth.
– Elevate the injured extremity to prevent swelling.
• Call your health care provider or take the person to an emergency department if:
– The wound is deep or large.
– Bite is on face, neck, or hands.
– Bite was from an unknown or wild animal.
– Wound has redness, swelling, pain, or draining pus.
– Person may need tetanus shot or stitches.
• If appropriate, contact the local health department or animal control about the bite.
• If possible, the animal that caused the bite should be checked for rabies. Call an animal control office for instructions.

MEDICATIONS

• Preventive antibiotic treatment may be prescribed.
• Antitetanus injection may have to be given.
• Sometimes, an antirabies vaccine or serum may have to be given.

ACTIVITY
No limits, except those caused by the injury.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member suffers from an animal bite that causes concern.
• The bite does not begin to heal within 2 to 3 days or signs of infection develop.
• New or unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

MORDEDURAS DE ANIMALES (Animal Bites) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Las mordeduras de animales son heridas a seres humanos causadas por mordeduras de perros, gatos u otros animales (incluyendo las de otros seres humanos).

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Las heridas por mordedura pueden resultar en lesiones tales como desgarro, punción o perforación, rasguños, rotura o trituración.
• Las mordeduras de perro por lo general ocurren en las manos, la cara, las piernas y los pies.
• Las mordeduras de gato por lo general ocurren en las manos, las piernas, los pies, la cara y el tronco.

CAUSAS

• La mayoría de las mordeduras son por animales domésticos que la víctima conoce. Perros de gran tamaño son los que más comúnmente las causan.
• Las mordeduras humanas a menudo resultan al darle una persona un puñetazo en la boca a otra.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON
Estar expuesto a animales domésticos o salvajes.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Enseñar tanto a los niños como a los adultos cómo evitar las mordeduras de animales.
• Evitar los animales callejeros.
• Para prevenir complicaciones en caso de recibir mordeduras de animales, mantenga al día su vacuna contra el tétano.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• Las heridas deberían ir mejorando y cicatrizar por completo en un periodo de 7 a 10 días.
• Las mordeduras de perro raramente se infectan. Las mordeduras de gatos y humanos se infectan frecuentemente.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Las mordeduras pueden provocar infecciones, lesiones considerables en los tejidos blandos produciendo cicatrices, hemorragia, rabia y, en ocasiones, la muerte.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Llame al 911 si una persona ha sido herida gravemente o está sangrando copiosamente.
• Para primeros auxilios:
– Lávese las manos antes y después de atender a la herida.
– Si la herida está sangrando aplique presión al área con una toalla o paño limpio hasta que el sangrado se detenga. Limpie la herida con agua y jabón, séquela, aplique un ungüento antibiótico y cúbrala con una gasa esterilizada o un paño limpio.
– Eleve la extremidad lesionada para evitar la hinchazón.
• Llame a su proveedor de atención médica o lleve a la persona a la sala de emergencias si:
– La herida es profunda o grande.
– La mordedura está en la cara, el cuello o las manos.
– La mordedura era de un animal desconocido o salvaje.
– La herida está enrojecida, hinchada, adolorida o drenando pus.
– La persona puede necesitar la vacuna contra el tétano o puntadas.
• Si el caso lo justifica, llame al departamento de salubridad de su localidad o a la oficina de control de animales para consultarles sobre la mordedura.
• De ser posible, el animal que causó la mordedura debe ser examinado para verificar si tiene rabia. Llame a la oficina de control de animales para instrucciones.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Un tratamiento antibiótico preventivo puede ser recetado.
• Una inyección antitetánica puede ser administrada.
• En ocasiones, una vacuna o suero antirrábico puede ser administrado.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin límites, excepto los causados por la lesión.

DIETA
Ninguna dieta especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Un animal lo muerde a usted o a un miembro de su familia y eso le causa preocupación.
• La herida no comienza a sanar dentro de 2 a 3 días, o hay signos de que se está desarrollando una infección.
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ANORECTAL ABSCESS (Perianal Abscess)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
An anorectal abscess is a collection of pus (due to infection) that develops in the anus and rectum. An abscess may occur on the edge of the anal opening or deep in the rectum. They are more common in men.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Swelling around the rectum.
• Redness around the rectum.
• Dull or throbbing pain around the rectum.
• Difficulty or pain with bowel movement.
• Unable to sit comfortably.
• Fever and chills.
• Bleeding or discharge if abscess ruptures.

CAUSES
Bacterial infection. It may occur in the glands inside the rectum that produce mucus. Bacteria in the stool can also infect a scratch or cut in the skin or in the rectum.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Diabetes.
• Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, or diverticulitis.
• Engaging in anal sex.
• Weak immune system due to illness or drugs.
• Blood cell cancers such as leukemia or lymphoma.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
No specific preventive measures.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
With treatment, complete healing in 6 weeks to several months (if no complications).

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• An extra opening (fistula) may develop between the anus and the outside of the body.
• Abscess may recur.
• Urinary retention.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider can diagnose the abscess with a physical exam of the affected area. Medical tests are usually not needed, but may include an x-ray or internal exam of the rectum with a special instrument.
• Treatment most often involves outpatient surgery to open and drain the abscess. For an abscess deeper in the rectum, the patient may need hospital care.
• Follow your health care provider’s instructions for changing bandages and other care after surgery. Keep that area of the body clean.
• A sitz bath may provide comfort after surgery. Sit in a bathtub (or a plastic sitz bath) of warm water (not hot) for 10 to 15 minutes several times a day.
• Use warm compress as needed for pain.
• Have a bowel movement when you need to, even though you may anticipate pain.

MEDICATIONS
Drugs may be prescribed for pain, infection, and to help prevent constipation.

ACTIVITY
Move legs often as you recover from surgery. Return to normal activities as soon as possible after surgery.

DIET
An increase in fiber in the diet may help lower the risk of constipation. Drink plenty of fluids.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of anorectal abscess.
• New or unexplained symptoms develop after surgery.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ABSCESO ANORRECTAL (Anorectal Abscess [Perianal Abscess]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Un absceso anorrectal es una acumulación de pus (debido a una infección) que se desarrolla en el ano y el recto. Un absceso puede aparecer en el borde de la abertura anal o en una parte profunda dentro del recto. Son más comunes en los hombres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Hinchazón alrededor del recto.
• Enrojecimiento alrededor del recto.
• Dolor sordo o punzante alrededor del recto.
• Dificultad o dolor al tener una evacuación.
• No poder sentarse cómodamente.
• Fiebre y escalofríos.
• Sangrado o secreción si el absceso se rompe.

CAUSAS
Infección bacteriana. Puede ocurrir en las glándulas dentro del recto que producen mucosidad. Las bacterias en las heces pueden infectar un rasguño o cortadura en la piel o en el recto.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Diabetes.
• Enfermedad de Crohn, colitis ulcerosa o diverticulitis.
• Practicar sexo anal.
• Sistema inmunológico débil debido a enfermedades o medicamentos.
• Cánceres de las células sanguíneas, tales como leucemia o linfoma.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No hay medidas preventivas específicas.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Con tratamiento, es de esperarse una curación completa que tomará de 6 semanas a varios meses (si no hay complicaciones).

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Una abertura adicional (fístula) se puede desarrollar entre el ano y la parte de afuera del cuerpo.
• El absceso puede recurrir.
• Retención urinaria.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le puede diagnosticar el absceso con un examen físico del área afectada. Generalmente no son necesarios exámenes médicos, pero pueden incluir radiografías o un examen interno del recto con un instrumento especial.
• El tratamiento frecuentemente envuelve una cirugía ambulatoria para abrir y drenar el absceso. Para abscesos más profundos en el recto, el paciente puede necesitar cuidado hospitalario.
• Siga las instrucciones de su proveedor de atención médica para cambiarse el vendaje y otros cuidados después de la cirugía. Mantenga esa área del cuerpo limpia.
• Un baño de asiento puede proporcionar alivio después de la cirugía. Llene la bañera (o una bañera plástica para baños de asiento) con agua tibia (no caliente) y siéntese en el agua durante 10 a 15 minutos, varias veces al día.
• Use compresas tibias cuando las necesite para el dolor.
• Vaya al baño cuando lo necesite, pese a que pueda anticipar dolor.

MEDICAMENTOS
Se pueden recetar medicamentos para el dolor, la infección y para ayudar a prevenir el estreñimiento.

ACTIVIDAD
Mueva las piernas frecuentemente mientras se recupera de la cirugía. Reanude las actividades normales tan pronto sea posible después de la cirugía.

DIETA
Un aumento de fibra en la dieta puede ayudar a disminuir el riesgo de estreñimiento. Tome suficiente líquido.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de un absceso anorrectal.
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables después de la cirugía.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ANOREXIA NERVOSA

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Anorexia nervosa is a type of eating disorder. A person refuses to eat enough to maintain a normal weight for height and age. It develops over time. It can affect all ages and both sexes (mainly females ages 12 to 25).

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Weight loss of at least 15% of ideal body weight.
• Continues to diet when not overweight. May restrict food intake or binge on food and then purge.
• Person feels fat even when extremely thin.
• Intense fear of becoming fat.
• Obsessed with food, but denies being hungry.
• Excess exercising.
• Stopping of menstrual periods or never starting.
• Uses diuretics, laxatives, emetics, and amphetamines.
• Depressed, moody, irritable, withdrawn, ritual or odd behaviors, and insomnia.
• Hair loss, dry skin, feeling cold, brittle nails, low blood pressure, and poor blood circulation.

CAUSES
Unknown. There are many theories. It involves using food and weight to deal with emotional problems, such as issues of self-worth and control for the patient.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Young females.
• Starting a normal weight-loss diet. The person refuses to stop dieting after a reasonable weight loss.
• Some personality traits such as perfectionism, obsessiveness, or low self-esteem.
• Family history of eating disorders.
• Family influence (overprotective or placing too much value on physical appearance).
• Society, cultural, and peer pressure to be thin.
• Emotional stress.
• Athletes, ballet dancers, cheerleaders, or models.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
No specific preventive measures. Early treatment may help keep it from progressing.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• Treatable if the patient recognizes the problem, wants help, and is compliant with treatment.
• Therapy may continue over several years. Relapses are common, especially when stressful situations occur.
• About 40% make a good recovery in 5 years, 40% have symptoms, but function fairly well, and 20% have severe, ongoing symptoms.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
Electrolyte imbalance, irregular heartbeat, esophagitis, gastritis, lack of menstrual periods, nerve disorders, anemia and weakness, infertility, osteoporosis, or suicide.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURE

• Your health care provider can usually diagnose anorexia with a physical exam and by asking questions about your symptoms, eating habits, and weight concerns. There is no one test to diagnose anorexia. Medical tests may be done to check for possible underlying disorder, physical problems, or complications.
• Denial of the severity or even the existence of a problem is common in patients. Most patients resist treatment and behavioral change at first. Some want a quick and easy solution that is not feasible.
• The goal of treatment is for the patient to establish healthy eating patterns to regain normal weight.
• Treatment may include counseling for the patient and the family, nutrition counseling, and drug therapy if needed. Hospital care may be required if the weight is extremely low or there are life-threatening symptoms.
• A dental exam is usually recommended.
• Counseling focuses on the misconceptions that patients have of themselves (physically, mentally, emotionally). Support groups may help some patients.
• To learn more: National Eating Disorders Association; 603 Stewart St., Suite 803, Seattle, WA 98101; (800) 931-2237; website: www.nationaleatingdisorders.org .

MEDICATIONS

• There is no one drug used to treat anorexia. Drugs may be prescribed for specific symptoms such as depression, anxiety, or agitation.
• Vitamin and mineral supplements may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY
May be limits at first until weight is gained. Then exercise for enjoyment and fitness and not to lose weight.

DIET
A dietitian will help you plan healthy meals that are not rigid, but provide food choices. Calories will be slowly increased over time to reach your individual needs.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of anorexia.
• Weight loss continues, despite treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page
ANOREXIA NERVIOSA (Anorexia Nervosa) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La anorexia nerviosa es un tipo de trastorno alimentario. La persona se niega a comer lo suficiente para mantener un peso normal para la estatura y edad. Se desarrolla con el pasar del tiempo. Puede afectar a las personas de todas las edades y de ambos sexos (especialmente a las mujeres entre los 12 y 25 años).

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Pérdida de por lo menos un 15% del peso ideal del cuerpo.
• Continua llevando una dieta inclusive cuando no tiene sobrepeso. Puede restringir el consumo de alimentos o come mucho y después lo vomita.
• La persona se siente gorda aun cuando es extremadamente delgada.
• Miedo intenso de volverse gorda.
• Obsesionada con la comida, pero niega el tener hambre.
• Exceso de ejercicio.
• Suspensión de la menstruación o nunca comienza.
• Uso de diuréticos, laxantes, eméticos y anfetaminas.
• Deprimida, malhumorada, irritable, apartada, comportamientos extraños o rituales e insomnio.
• Pérdida del pelo, resequedad de la piel, frío, uñas quebradizas, presión sanguínea baja y mala circulación sanguínea.

CAUSAS
Desconocidas, pero hay muchas teorías. Pueden incluir usar la comida y el peso para lidiar con los problemas emocionales, tales como los asuntos de autoestima y control de la persona.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Mujeres jóvenes.
• Comenzar una dieta normal de pérdida de peso. La persona se niega a parar su dieta después de una pérdida de peso razonable.
• Algunas características de personalidad tales como perfeccionismo, obsesiones y autoestima baja.
• Antecedentes familiares de trastornos alimenticios.
• Influencia familiar (sobreprotección o darle demasiado valor a la apariencia física).
• Presión de la sociedad, cultural o de grupo a ser delgada.
• Estrés emocional.
• Atletas, bailarinas de ballet, animadoras o modelos.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No hay medidas preventivas específicas. El tratamiento temprano puede ayudar a evitar que progrese.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• Este trastorno se cura si el paciente reconoce su problema, quiere ayuda y coopera con el tratamiento.
• La terapia puede continuar por varios años. Las recaídas son normales, especialmente cuando una situación estresante ocurre.
• Alrededor del 40% de los pacientes se recuperan bien en cinco años, un 40% tienen síntomas pero funcionan bastante bien y un 20% tienen síntomas graves y continuos.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Desequilibrio de electrolitos, latidos irregulares del corazón, esofagitis, gastritis, suspensión de la menstruación, trastornos nerviosos, anemia y debilidad, infertilidad, osteoporosis o suicidio.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Generalmente el proveedor de atención médica puede diagnosticar la anorexia con un examen físico y haciendo preguntas acerca de los síntomas, hábitos alimenticios y preocupaciones acerca del peso. No existe un examen único que pueda diagnosticar la anorexia. Se pueden hacer exámenes médicos para chequear para posibles trastornos subyacentes, problemas físicos o complicaciones.
• La negación de la gravedad o incluso de la existencia del problema es común en los pacientes. La mayoría de los pacientes se resisten al tratamiento o a cambiar su comportamiento al principio. Algunos quieren una solución rápida y fácil, lo que no es posible.
• La meta del tratamiento es que el paciente establezca patrones alimenticios saludables con el fin de recuperar su peso normal.
• El tratamiento puede incluir asesoramiento psicológico para el paciente y la familia, asesoramiento nutricional y terapia con medicamentos, si es necesaria. Puede necesitarse hospitalización si el peso es extremadamente bajo o los síntomas ponen la vida en peligro.
• Generalmente se recomienda un examen dental.
• El asesoramiento psicológico se concentra en los conceptos erróneos que el paciente tiene de sí mismo (físicos, mentales, emocionales). Los grupos de apoyo pueden ayudar a algunas personas.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: National Eating Disorders; 603 Stewart St., Suite 803, Seattle, WA 98101; (800) 931-2237; sitio web: www.nationaleatingdisorders.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• No hay un medicamento específico usado para tratar la anorexia. Sin embargo, pueden recetarse medicamentos para síntomas específicos, tales como la depresión, ansiedad o agitación.
• Pueden recetarse suplementos vitamínicos y minerales.

ACTIVIDAD
Pueden limitarse al principio hasta que recupere el peso. Luego haga ejercicio por placer y condición física pero no para perder peso.

DIETA
Un nutricionista le ayudará con un plan de comidas saludables que no sea rígido, pero que provea opciones alimenticias. Las calorías serán lentamente aumentadas con el pasar del tiempo hasta alcanzar sus necesidades individuales.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de anorexia.
• La pérdida de peso continúa, a pesar del tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ANXIETY DISORDER, GENERALIZED

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Generalized anxiety disorder is an illness that involves constant worry even though little or nothing is wrong. A person feels tense most of the time and always expects the worst to happen. They may worry about health, money, family, work, or an unknown or unspecified threat. Symptoms may be severe and interfere with daily living. Attempts to avoid the anxiety lead to more anxiety. Anxiety comes on slowly and can start in childhood, teens, or as an adult. It occurs more in women.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Feeling that something undesirable or harmful is about to happen.
• Constant worry about things (big and small).
• Aches and pains for unknown reasons.
• Feeling tired.
• Unable to relax.
• Muscle tension, headaches, backache.
• Trouble falling or staying asleep.
• Dry mouth, swallowing difficulty, or hoarseness.
• Twitching or trembling.
• Unable to focus or concentrate.
• Feeling irritable or grouchy.
• Nausea, diarrhea, weight loss.
• Sweating or hot flashes.
• Easily startled.

CAUSES
It is most likely a combination of hereditary factors, environmental factors (such as childhood experiences), and chemical disturbances in the brain.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Women.
• Stressful events or crisis in one’s life.
• Family history of anxiety disorders.
• Other emotional or mental illness (depression, panic disorder, phobias, or dysthymia).
• Medical illness (e.g., chronic pain, asthma, or others).
• Alcohol or substance abuse.
• Lack of social connections.
• Certain personality factors (being shy or a worrier).
• Living in poverty, in a minority group, or immigrants.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
There are no specific preventive measures.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Anxiety can be controlled with treatment. Overcoming anxiety often results in a richer, more satisfying life.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Impaired social and work functioning.
• Depression, panic disorder, or social phobia.
• Dependence on drugs or alcohol.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms. A mental health test may be done. There is no specific test to diagnose anxiety. Medical tests may be done to rule out other medical disorders.
• Treatment may involve psychotherapy (treatment of emotional and mental problems), self-care, and drugs.
• Cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) is often recommended. Cognitive therapy teaches how to change thoughts, behaviors, or attitudes. Behavior therapy teaches ways to reduce anxiety with deep breathing and muscle relaxation.
• Self-care steps may include:
– Talking to a friend or family member about your feelings. This sometimes defuses your anxiety.
– Keeping a journal about your anxious thoughts or emotions. Consider the causes and possible solutions.
– Joining a self-help group.
– Learning relaxation techniques. For some people, meditation is effective.
– Reducing stress in your life where possible.
• To learn more: National Institute of Mental Health; 6001 Executive Blvd, Bethesda, MD 20892-9663; (800) 647-2642; website: www.nimh.nih.gov .

MEDICATIONS

• Antianxiety drugs may be prescribed.
• Antidepressants may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY
Stay active. Physical exertion helps reduce anxiety.

DIET
No special diet. Avoid caffeine and alcohol.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of anxiety.
• Symptoms recur after treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

TRASTORNO DE ANSIEDAD GENERALIZADA (Anxiety Disorder, Generalized) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
El trastorno de ansiedad generalizada es una enfermedad que involvera una preocupación constante, incluso cuando hay poco o nada de qué preocuparse. La persona se siente tensa la mayoría del tiempo y siempre espera que lo peor ocurra. Se pueden preocupar por la salud, el dinero, la familia, el trabajo, o por una amenaza no específica o desconocida. Los síntomas pueden ser severos e interferir con el diario vivir. Los intentos de evitar la ansiedad conducen a más ansiedad. La ansiedad comienza lentamente y puede comenzar en la infancia, adolescencia o adultez. Es más común en las mujeres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Sensación de que algo indeseado o peligroso está a punto de suceder.
• Preocupación constante acerca de asuntos (grandes y pequeños).
• Dolores y molestias por razones desconocidas.
• Sensación de cansancio.
• Incapacidad para relajarse.
• Tensión muscular; dolores de cabeza; dolor de espalda.
• Problemas para quedarse o permanecer dormido.
• Sequedad en la boca, dificultad para tragar o ronquera.
• Espasmos o temblores.
• Incapacidad para enfocarse o concentrarse.
• Sensación de irritabilidad y mal humor.
• Náuseas; diarrea; pérdida de peso.
• Sudores o sofocones calientes.
• Sobresaltarse con facilidad.

CAUSAS
Es bastante probable que sea una combinación de factores hereditarios, ambientales (tales como las experiencias de la niñez) y trastornos químicos en el cerebro.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Mujeres.
• Situaciones estresantes o crisis en la vida.
• Antecedentes familiares de trastornos de ansiedad.
• Otras enfermedades emocionales o mentales (depresión, trastorno de pánico, fobias o distimia).
• Enfermedades clínicas (p. ej., dolor crónico, asma u otras).
• Abuso de alcohol o de sustancias.
• Falta de conexiones sociales.
• Ciertos aspectos de la personalidad (ser tímido o aprensivo).
• Vivir bajo condiciones de pobreza, en un grupo de minoría o ser inmigrante.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No hay medidas preventivas específicas.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
La ansiedad puede controlarse con tratamiento. El superar la ansiedad con frecuencia resulta en una vida más rica y satisfactoria.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Incapacidad social o no poder funcionar en el trabajo.
• Depresión, trastorno de pánico o fobia social.
• Dependencia de drogas o alcohol.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas. Se puede hacer un examen de salud mental. No hay un examen específico para diagnosticar la ansiedad. Se pueden hacer exámenes médicos para descartar la existencia de otros trastornos médicos.
• El tratamiento puede incluir psicoterapia (tratamiento de los problemas emocionales y mentales), autocuidado y medicamentos.
• Frecuentemente se recomienda la terapia cognitiva del comportamiento (CBT, por sus siglas en inglés). La terapia cognitiva enseña cómo cambiar los pensamientos, los comportamientos o las actitudes. La terapia conductual enseña maneras de reducir la ansiedad con respiración profunda y relajamiento muscular.
• Las medidas de autocuidado incluyen:
– Hablar con un amigo o un miembro de la familia acerca de sus sentimientos. Esto en algunas ocasiones disminuye la ansiedad
– Mantener un diario acerca de sus pensamientos o emociones de ansiedad. Considere las causas y posibles soluciones
– Unirse a un grupo de autoayuda
– Aprender técnicas de relajación. Para algunas personas, la meditación es efectiva
– Reducir el estrés en su vida cuando sea posible
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: National Institute of Mental Health; 6001 Executive Blvd., Bethesda, MD 20892-9663; (800) 647-2642; sitio web: www.nimh.nih.gov .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se pueden recetar medicamentos contra la ansiedad.
• Se pueden recetar antidepresivos.

ACTIVIDAD
Manténgase activo. El esfuerzo físico ayuda a disminuir la ansiedad.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial. Evite la cafeína y el alcohol.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de ansiedad.
• Los síntomas vuelven a ocurrir después del tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

APPENDICITIS

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Appendicitis is an inflammation of the appendix. The appendix is a small tube-like pouch that is part of the large intestine. The appendix has no known function, but it can become diseased. Symptoms vary widely. It can affect all ages and both sexes. It occurs most often in ages 10 to 19 and in males more than females.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Pain that frequently begins close to the navel and moves toward the right lower abdomen. Pain becomes persistent. It worsens with moving, breathing deeply, coughing, sneezing, walking, or being touched.
• Nausea and sometimes vomiting.
• Constipation and inability to pass gas.
• Diarrhea (occasionally).
• Low fever (begins after other symptoms).
• Abdominal swelling (late stages).

CAUSES
The exact cause is unknown. The appendix may be blocked with feces from the intestinal tract which leads to infection. When infected, the appendix becomes swollen, inflamed, and filled with pus.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Viral or bacterial infection of the gastrointestinal tract.
• Family history of appendicitis.
• Cystic fibrosis.
• Diet that is low in fiber.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
No specific preventive measures.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Curable with surgery. People can live a normal life without their appendix.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Rupture of the appendix, abscess (pus-filled area), and peritonitis. Rupture occurs earlier in children, but is more common in older persons.
• Wound infection or other surgery complications.
• Bowel obstruction.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Don’t take any laxatives, enemas, or drugs for pain prior to diagnosis. Laxatives may lead to rupture, and pain or fever reducers make diagnosis more difficult.
• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms. Medical tests may include blood and urine studies, x-ray, CT, ultrasound, or other tests to confirm the diagnosis.
• Treatment involves surgery to remove the appendix (appendectomy). Because appendicitis can be hard to diagnose, surgery may be delayed until symptoms and signs progress enough to confirm the diagnosis.
• Surgery may be done with a laparoscope (a tube-like instrument with a light on the end). Small incisions (3 to 4) are made in the abdomen. The appendix is removed using instruments inserted into the incisions.
• Open surgery may be done. This involves one larger incision in the abdomen to remove the appendix. This type of surgery is done if the appendix has ruptured (burst).
• If an abscess has formed, surgery may be delayed until the abscess is drained and has time to heal.

MEDICATIONS

• Antibiotics for infection and drugs for pain are usually prescribed after surgery.
• Stool softeners to prevent constipation may be recommended.

ACTIVITY

• Rest in a bed or chair until surgery.
• Resume normal activities gradually after surgery.

DIET

• Don’t eat or drink anything until appendicitis has been diagnosed. Anesthesia for surgery is much safer if the stomach is empty. If you are very thirsty, wash your mouth out with water.
• After surgery, a liquid diet is used for a short time. A regular diet may be resumed as the intestinal tract returns to normal.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of appendicitis.
• The following occur after surgery:
– Fever of 101.5°F (38.6°C) or higher.
– Increased redness, swelling, or pain at the incision site or if the site has drainage.
– Vomiting or diarrhea occurs.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

APENDICITIS (Appendicitis) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La apendicitis es una inflamación del apéndice. El apéndice es una bolsita pequeña que parece un tubo y es parte del intestino grueso. El apéndice no tiene ninguna función conocida, pero puede enfermarse. Los síntomas varían mucho. Puede afectar a personas de todas las edades y de ambos sexos. Ocurre con más frecuencia en las edades de 10 a 19 años y en los hombres más que en las mujeres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Dolor que frecuentemente comienza cerca del ombligo y corre hacia el lado derecho inferior del abdomen. El dolor llega a ser constante. Es más fuerte al moverse, respirar profundamente, toser, estornudar, caminar o tocar el sitio.
• Náuseas y, a veces, vómitos.
• Estreñimiento e incapacidad de expeler gases.
• Diarrea (ocasionalmente).
• Fiebre baja (comienza después de los otros síntomas).
• Inflamación abdominal (en las últimas etapas).

CAUSAS
Se desconoce la causa exacta. El apéndice puede estar bloqueado con heces del tracto intestinal lo que lleva a la infección. Cuando se infecta, el apéndice se hincha, se inflama y se llena de pus.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Infección viral o bacteriana del tracto gastrointestinal.
• Antecedentes familiares de apendicitis.
• Fibrosis quística.
• Una dieta baja en fibra.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No hay medidas preventivas específicas.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Se cura con cirugía. Las personas pueden vivir una vida normal sin el apéndice.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Ruptura del apéndice, formación de un absceso (área llena con pus) y peritonitis. La ruptura ocurre más temprano en los niños, pero es más común en las personas mayores.
• Infección de la herida u otras complicaciones por la cirugía.
• Obstrucción del intestino.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• No tome laxantes, enemas o medicamentos para el dolor antes del diagnóstico. Los laxantes pueden conducir a una ruptura y los analgésicos o los medicamentos contra la fiebre hacen el diagnóstico más difícil.
• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir análisis de sangre y orina, radiografías, tomografía computarizada, ultrasonido u otros exámenes para confirmar el diagnóstico.
• El tratamiento incluye cirugía para extirpar el apéndice (apendectomía). Debido a que la apendicitis puede ser difícil de diagnosticar, se puede retrasar la cirugía hasta que los síntomas y los signos progresen lo suficiente para confirmar el diagnóstico.
• Puede hacerse cirugía con un laparoscopio (un instrumento que parece un tubo con un una luz en la punta). Se hacen pequeñas incisiones (de tres a cuatro) en el abdomen. El apéndice se extirpa usando instrumentos insertados en las incisiones.
• Puede hacerse cirugía abierta. Esto incluye una incisión grande en el abdomen para extirpar el apéndice. Este tipo de cirugía se hace si el apéndice se ha roto (o reventado).
• Si se ha formado un absceso, puede posponerse la cirugía hasta drenarlo y darle tiempo a que cicatrice.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Generalmente después de la cirugía se recetan antibióticos para combatir infecciones y analgésicos para el dolor.
• Pueden recomendarse laxantes del tipo que ablandan las heces, para evitar el estreñimiento.

ACTIVIDAD

• Descanse en cama o en una silla hasta la cirugía.
• Después de la cirugía reanude gradualmente sus actividades.

DIETA

• Absténgase de comer o beber hasta que se confirme el diagnóstico de apendicitis. La anestesia para la cirugía es mucho menos peligrosa si el estómago está vacío. Si siente mucha sed, enjuáguese la boca con agua.
• Después de la cirugía, ingiera una dieta líquida por un tiempo corto. Puede reanudar una dieta regular a medida que el tracto intestinal regrese a su condición normal.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de apendicitis.
• Después de la cirugía ocurre lo siguiente:
– Fiebre de 101.5°F (38.6°C) o más alta
– Aumenta el enrojecimiento, hinchazón o dolor en el lugar de la incisión o donde le drenaron el absceso
– Vómitos y diarrea ocurren
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ARTHRITIS, JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION

• Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints. It affects children under age 16 and can start at any age. JIA types are based on symptoms in the first 6 months of the disease. Types:
– Systemic arthritis—affects at least 1 joint. Inflammation occurs in other parts of the body besides the joints.
– Oligoarthritis (prior name pauciarticular)—affects 1 to 4 joints.
– Polyarthritis-rheumatoid factor negative or positive (prior name polyarticular)—affects 5 or more joints.
– Others types—psoriatic arthritis, enthesitis-related arthritis, and undifferentiated arthritis.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Symptoms vary for each type. Symptoms may occur often or rarely. They vary from mild to severe.
• Joints usually affected are the knees, hands, and feet.
• Joint symptoms may include swelling, warmth, pain, or aching. Children may not complain about joint pain.
• Stiffness occurs in the morning or after a nap.
• Child may limp or develop clumsiness. The child may refuse to walk without being able to explain why.
• Fevers and rashes may come and go.
• Swollen lymph nodes.
• Red eye, eye pain, or photophobia (light sensitivity).

CAUSES
Idiopathic means unknown cause. There appears to be genetic and immune system factors. Trauma (injury), infection, or emotional stress may be trigger factors.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Family history of JIA.
• Family history of autoimmune disease (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and others).

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Cannot be prevented at present.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Outcome depends on type of JIA and response to treatment. Early diagnosis and treatment helps improve outcome. Some children will have permanent remission.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Joint, bone, eye, or other body system complications.
• Behavior and school difficulties; growth retardation.
• Side effects of drugs used for therapy.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your child’s health care provider will do a physical exam. Questions will be asked about the symptoms and if they have gone on for at least 6 weeks. No specific test is available to diagnose JIA. Medical tests may include blood and joint fluid studies, x-rays, or others.
• Treatment involves steps to relieve symptoms, preserve joint function, prevent complications, and help the child live as normal a life as possible.
• Treatment may include drug therapy, exercise, eye and dental care, help with emotional concerns, and other medical care as needed. You and your child’s health care team will decide on a program based on your child’s special needs.
• Children should attend regular school on a daily basis. Where needed, the school system should provide extra services to accommodate the child’s needs.
• Eye exams at least twice a year will help detect any eye complications. Dental exams are also important.
• Surgery may (rarely) be needed for joint problems.
• To learn more: American Juvenile Arthritis Organization, PO Box 7669, Atlanta, GA 30357; (800) 283-7800; website: www.arthritis.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to reduce pain and inflammation will be prescribed.
• Other drugs are usually prescribed to help alter the progress of the disease and delay/prevent joint damage.

ACTIVITY

• Occupational therapy helps with activities of daily life.
• Physical therapy helps keep joints mobile and muscles strong. Your child will be taught how to perform daily exercises (such as range-of-motion) at home.
• Splints may be used to support and protect joints.
• In general, contact sports should be avoided. The child should be encouraged to participate in other sports and recreational activities.

DIET
A poor appetite is common. Some children gain excess weight due to inactivity or drug side effects. Provide a healthy diet to help maintain normal body weight.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• Your child has any symptoms of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.
• After diagnosis, new or worsening symptoms occur.
• Drugs used for therapy cause unexpected side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ARTRITIS JUVENIL IDIOPATICA (Arthritis, Juvenile Idiopathic) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION

• La artritis juvenil idiopática (JIA, por sus siglas en inglés) es una enfermedad inflamatoria crónica de las articulaciones. Afecta a niños menores de 16 años y puede comenzar a cualquier edad. Los tipos de JIA se basan en los síntomas durante los primeros 6 meses de la enfermedad. Tipos:
– Artritis sistémica–afecta al menos a una articulación. Otras partes del cuerpo se inflaman además de las articulaciones
– Oligoartritis (nombre anterior: pauciarticular)–afecta de 1 a 4 articulaciones
– Poliartritis–factor reumatoide negativo o positivo (nombre anterior: poliarticular)–afecta a 5 o más articulaciones
– Otros tipos–artritis psoriásica, artritis asociada a entesitis y artritis indiferenciada

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Los síntomas varían para cada tipo. Los síntomas pueden ocurrir a menudo o en raras ocasiones. Varían de leve a grave.
• Las articulaciones generalmente afectadas son las rodillas, manos y pies.
• Los síntomas articulares pueden incluir hinchazón, calor moderado o dolor. Puede ser que los niños no se quejen de dolor de las articulaciones.
• Se puede sentir tieso en la mañana o después de una siesta.
• El niño puede cojear o desarrollar torpeza. El niño puede negarse a caminar sin ser capaz de explicar por qué.
• Fiebres y erupciones pueden aparecer y desaparecer.
• Inflamación de los ganglios linfáticos.
• Ojo enrojecido, dolor de ojo o fotofobia (sensibilidad a la luz).

CAUSAS
Idiopático quiere decir causa desconocida. Parecen haber factores genéticos y del sistema inmunológico. Trauma (lesión), infección o estrés emocional pueden ser factores desencadenantes.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Antecedentes familiares de JIA.
• Antecedentes familiares de enfermedad autoinmune (p. ej., artritis reumatoide, esclerosis múltiple y otros).

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No se puede prevenir en la actualidad.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
El resultado depende del tipo de JIA y la reacción al tratamiento. La diagnosis y el tratamiento temprano pueden ayudar a mejorar el resultado. Algunos niños tendrán remisión permanente.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Complicaciones de las articulaciones, huesos, ojos u otros sistemas del cuerpo.
• Dificultades de comportamiento y escolares; crecimiento retardado.
• Efectos secundarios de los medicamentos usados en la terapia.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• El proveedor de salud de su hijo le hará un examen físico. Se le harán preguntas sobre los síntomas y si se han prolongado durante por lo menos 6 semanas. No hay una prueba específica para diagnosticar JIA. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir estudios de la sangre y de los fluidos de las articulaciones, radiografías u otros.
• El tratamiento consiste en medidas para aliviar los síntomas, preservar la función de las articulaciones, prevenir complicaciones y ayudar a que el niño viva una vida tan normal como sea posible.
• El tratamiento puede incluir terapia de medicamentos, ejercicio, cuidado de la vista y dental, ayuda con problemas emocionales y otros cuidados médicos que sean necesarios. Usted y el equipo de proveedores de salud de su hijo decidirán la implementación de un programa basado en las necesidades especiales de su hijo.
• Los niños deben asistir diariamente a la escuela regular. Cuando sea necesario, el sistema escolar debe proporcionar servicios adicionales para acomodar las necesidades del niño.
• Exámenes de la vista por lo menos dos veces al año ayudarán a detectar cualquier complicación visual. Los exámenes dentales también son importantes.
• Se puede necesitar cirugía (raramente) para los problemas articulares.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: American Juvenile Arthritis Organization, PO Box 7669, Atlanta, GA 30357; (800) 283-7800, sitio web: www.arthritis.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se le prescribirán medicamentos antiinflamatorios no esteroideo para reducir el dolor y la inflamación.
• Generalmente se prescriben otros medicamentos para ayudar a modificar la evolución de la enfermedad y retrasar/prevenir daños articulares.

ACTIVIDAD

• La terapia ocupacional ayuda con las actividades de la vida diaria.
• La fisioterapia ayuda a mantener las articulaciones móviles y los músculos fuertes. Se le enseñará a su hijo cómo hacer ejercicios diarios (como ejercicios de amplitud de movimiento) en casa.
• Se pueden utilizar tablillas para soportar y proteger las articulaciones.
• En general, se deben evitar los deportes de contacto. Se le debe animar al niño a que participe en otros deportes y actividades recreacionales.

DIETA
La falta de apetito es frecuente. Algunos niños ganan peso excesivo debido a la inactividad o los efectos secundarios de los medicamentos. Proporciónele una dieta saludable para ayudarle a mantener el peso normal del cuerpo.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Su hijo tiene síntomas de artritis juvenil idiopática.
• Después del diagnóstico aparecen síntomas nuevos o peores.
• Medicamentos usados en la terapia causan efectos secundarios inesperados.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ARTHRITIS, RHEUMATOID

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory disease that mainly affects the joints. It often begins between ages 25 and 50, and is more common in women.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Joint pain, redness, warmth, and tenderness. It usually affects the same joints on both sides of the body—fingers, hands, wrists, elbows, shoulders, feet, and ankles.
• Morning stiffness.
• Muscle aches, weakness, fever, and weight loss.
• Feeling generally unwell.
• Nodules (bumps) under the skin (sometimes).

CAUSES
Unknown. It is probably caused by an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s immune system attacks its own normal tissues. Infection may also be a factor.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Family history of rheumatoid arthritis or other autoimmune disorders.
• Genetic factors.
• Women.
• Native Americans (occurs more often in this group).

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
No specific preventive measures.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
The outcome varies. The disease course may be short and limited or progressive and severe. It is presently incurable. Pain relief, prevention of disability, and an active, normal life span are often possible.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• About 5% to 10% of patients are eventually disabled.
• Drugs used in treatment can cause side effects.
• Heart, lung, blood vessel, or eye problems.
• Anemia.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about the symptoms. No one test is available to diagnose arthritis. Medical tests may include blood and joint fluid studies. CT, MRI, and x-rays of the involved joints.
• Treatment involves steps to relieve symptoms, to preserve joint function, to prevent complications, and to help the person live as normal a life as possible.
• Treatment steps include drug therapy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, surgery, and lifestyle changes. A treatment plan is based on your special needs.
• Be sure to educate your-self about the disorder. Avoid arthritis treatment fads.
• Occupational therapy helps with activities of daily life
• Help the morning stiffness with a warm bath or shower, doing range-of-motion exercises, or a heating pad or cold pack (if it feels better).
• Options for treatment (to help symptoms such as pain) include relaxation techniques, counseling, meditation, stress reduction, biofeedback, and support groups. Flare-ups may be triggered by emotional stress.
• Surgery may be recommended for one or more joints. It may involve joint replacement, tendon reconstruction, joint realignment, or removing inflamed tissue.
• To learn more: Arthritis Foundation, PO Box 7669, Atlanta, GA 30357; (800) 283-7800; website: www.arthritis.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as naproxen or ibuprofen, or others will be prescribed.
• Drugs for pain, such as acetaminophen may be used.
• Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), biologic response modifiers, or steroids are classes of drugs that are often prescribed.

ACTIVITY

• Physical therapy will help maintain strength and joint mobility. Follow instructions for home exercising.
• Exercising in a heated pool is good for stiff joints.
• Activity options include low impact aerobics, flexibility exercises, yoga, tai chi, or hydrotherapy.
• Mobility aids and splints may be recommended.

DIET
Eat a normal, well-balanced diet. Avoid arthritis diet fads, which are common. Lose weight if you are overweight. Being overweight stresses the joints.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.
• The following occur during treatment:
– Symptoms appear in different joints or other symptoms get worse.
– New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used for treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ARTRITIS REUMATOIDE (Arthritis, Rheumatoid) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La artritis reumatoide es una enfermedad inflamatoria crónica que afecta mayormente las articulaciones. Frecuentemente comienza entre los 25 y 50 años y es más común en las mujeres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Dolor, enrojecimiento, calor y sensibilidad en las articulaciones. Generalmente afecta a las mismas articulaciones en ambos lados del cuerpo–los dedos, las manos, las muñecas, los codos, los hombros, los pies y los tobillos.
• Rigidez al comenzar el día.
• Dolor muscular, debilidad, fiebre y pérdida de peso.
• Sensación de malestar general.
• Nódulos (bultos) bajo la piel (a veces).

CAUSAS
Desconocidas, pero es probablemente causada por un trastorno autoinmune en el cual el sistema inmunológico del cuerpo ataca sus propios tejidos. Una infección también puede ser un factor.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Antecedentes familiares de artritis reumatoide u otros trastornos autoinmunes.
• Factores genéticos.
• Mujeres.
• Indígenas americanos (ocurre con más frecuencia en este grupo).

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No existen medidas preventivas específicas.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
El pronóstico varía. El curso de la enfermedad puede ser corto y limitado o progresivo y severo. En la actualidad es incurable. Es posible aliviar el dolor, prevenir la invalidez y vivir un lapso de vida normal y activa.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Alrededor de un 5% a 10% de los pacientes eventualmente terminan incapacitados.
• Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
• Problemas del corazón, del pulmón, de los vasos sanguíneos y de los ojos.
• Anemia.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas. No hay un examen específico disponible para diagnosticar la artritis. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir análisis de sangre y del líquido de las articulaciones, tomografía computarizada, imágenes por resonancia magnética o radiografías de las articulaciones afectadas.
• El tratamiento incluye medidas para aliviar los síntomas, preservar la función de la articulación, prevenir complicaciones y ayudar a la persona a vivir una vida lo más normalmente posible.
• Las medidas de tratamiento incluyen terapia con medicamentos, terapia física, terapia ocupacional, cirugía y cambios en el estilo de vida. El plan de tratamiento depende de sus necesidades especiales.
• Asegúrese de educarse acerca del trastorno. Evite los tratamientos novedosos para la artritis.
• La terapia ocupacional ayuda con las actividades diarias de la vida. Para ayudar con la rigidez al comenzar el día tome baños o duchas tibios, haga ejercicios que aumenten el rango del movimiento o aplíquese almohadillas eléctricas o compresas frías (si le hace sentir mejor).
• Las opciones de tratamiento (para aliviar síntomas tales como el dolor) incluyen técnicas de relajación, asesoramiento psicológico, meditación, reducción del estrés, biorretroalimentación y grupos de apoyo. Los ataques pueden ser provocados por el estrés emocional.
• Puede recomendarse cirugía para una o más articulaciones. Esto puede incluir reemplazo de la articulación, reconstrucción del tendón, realineación de la articulación o remoción del tejido inflamado.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: Arthritis Foundation, P.O. Box 7669, Atlanta, GA 30357; (800) 283-7800; sitio web: www.arthritis.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se recetarán medicamentos antiinflamatorios no esteroides, (NSAIDs, por sus siglas en inglés), como naproxeno o ibuprofeno, u otros.
• Se pueden usar medicamentos contra el dolor, como el paracetamol.
• Los medicamentos antirreumáticos modificadores de la enfermedad (DMARDs, por sus siglas en inglés), modificadores de la respuesta biológica o esteroides son clases de medicamentos que se recetan frecuentemente.

ACTIVIDAD

• La terapia física ayudará a mantener la fuerza y movilidad de la articulación. Siga las instrucciones para los ejercicios caseros.
• Ejercitarse en una piscina caliente es bueno para las articulaciones rígidas.
• Las opciones de actividades incluyen aeróbicos de bajo impacto, ejercicios de flexibilidad, yoga, tai chi o hidroterapia.
• Pueden recomendarse aparatos para ayudar con la movilidad y férulas.

DIETA
Coma una dieta normal y bien equilibrada. Evite las dietas especiales para la artritis, las cuales son comunes. Pierda peso si tiene sobrepeso. El sobrepeso sobrecarga las articulaciones.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de artritis reumatoide.
• Durante el tratamiento ocurre lo siguiente:
– Los síntomas aparecen en otra articulación o los síntomas empeoran
– Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados para el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ASBESTOSIS

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Asbestosis is inflammation of the lung due to breathing asbestos particles. It is a chronic disorder, but is not contagious. Men over age 40 who have been exposed to asbestos are more likely to be affected.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Shortness of breath.
• Cough that produces little or no sputum.
• General ill feeling.
• Fitful sleep.
• Appetite loss and weight loss.
• Chest pain.
• Hoarseness.
• Coughing up blood.
• Bluish nails.

CAUSES
Long-term exposure to small particles of asbestos at work or from other sources. The outer part of the lung becomes irritated by the asbestos fibers. This leads to inflammation and to a thickening and scarring of the lung tissue (pulmonary fibrosis). It may take up to 20 years or more between exposure to asbestos and the symptoms of the disease. This period may be shorter after intense exposure.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Work that involves asbestos.
• Smoking.
• Excess alcohol use.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• During exposure to asbestos, wear a protective mask or external-air-supplied hood.
• Follow recommended industrial safety procedures to suppress asbestos dust.
• For workers in asbestos industries: have regularly scheduled x-rays to detect any shadow on the lungs. If a problem develops, the person should stop working with asbestos, even if there are no symptoms.
• Don’t smoke.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
There is no cure. In a few patients, it may remain unchanged, but in most, it is slowly progressive (even without further exposure to asbestos). Symptoms can usually be relieved or controlled.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
• Heart failure due to lung disease.
• It may lead to cancer of the lungs (the risk is greatly increased in cigarette smokers).
• Tuberculosis.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask about your symptoms and past exposure to asbestos. Medical tests usually include a CT or x-rays of the lungs and lung function tests. A bronchoscopy may be done (an instrument with a lighted tip is used to view inside the lungs and remove tissue for a biopsy).
• There is no specific treatment for asbestosis. Treatment can help relieve the symptoms and prevent complications.
• Avoid any further contact with asbestos.
• Stop smoking. Find a way to quit that works for you.
• Obtain medical care for any respiratory infection, including the common cold.
• Chest physical therapy techniques will be provided by a respiratory therapist.
• Learn and practice bronchial drainage.
• Use a cool-mist humidifier (if advised) to loosen bronchial secretions so they can be coughed up easily.
• Keep flu and pneumococcal vaccines up-to-date.
• Supplemental oxygen may be required.
• Avoid crowds and persons with infections.
• To learn more: American Lung Association, 61 Broadway, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10006; (800) 586-4872; website: www.lungusa.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Bronchodilators (inhaled or oral) may help open up the bronchial tubes and allow passage of air. This is supervised at first by an inhalation therapist.
• For minor discomfort, use nonprescription drugs, such as acetaminophen or aspirin.

ACTIVITY
Regular exercise in whatever forms possible is important to preserve lung capacity.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of asbestosis.
• New symptoms develop or other symptoms get worse, despite treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ASBESTOSIS (Asbestosis) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Asbestosis es la inflamación pulmonar debido a la inhalación de partículas de asbestos. Este es un trastorno crónico y no es contagioso. Los hombres mayores de 40 años que han estado expuestos a asbestos tienen mayores probabilidades de verse afectados.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Falta de aire.
• Tos sin esputo o que produce muy poco esputo.
• Sensación de malestar general.
• Sueño irregular.
• Pérdida de apetito o de peso.
• Dolor de pecho.
• Ronquera.
• Escupir sangre.
• Uñas azuladas.

CAUSAS
Haber estado expuesto por largo tiempo a minúsculas partículas de asbestos en el trabajo o en alguna otra parte. Las fibras de asbestos irritan la parte exterior del pulmón provocando inflamación, engrosamiento y formación de cicatrices en los tejidos pulmonares (fibrosis pulmonar). Pueden pasar hasta 20 años o más desde que la persona estuvo expuesta al asbesto hasta la aparición de los primeros síntomas. Este periodo puede ser más corto después de una exposición intensa.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Trabajos que involucran asbestos.
• Fumar.
• Consumo excesivo de alcohol.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Use una máscara protectora o una mascarilla con suministro externo de aire mientras esté expuesto a los asbestos.
• Siga los procedimientos de seguridad industrial recomendados para contener las partículas de asbestos.
• Para los trabajadores en la industria de asbestos, hacerse radiografías regulares para detectar cualquier sombra en los pulmones. Si se desarrolla un problema, la persona debe dejar de trabajar con los asbestos, incluso si no hay síntomas.
• No fume.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
No hay cura. En unos pocos pacientes, permanece sin cambio, pero en la mayoría, progresa lentamente (aun sin exposición futura a asbestos). Generalmente los síntomas pueden aliviarse o controlarse.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica (COPD, por sus siglas en inglés).
• Insuficiencia cardiaca debido a la enfermedad pulmonar.
• Puede conducir a cáncer de los pulmones (el riesgo aumenta considerablemente en los fumadores).
• Tuberculosis.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas y las exposiciones pasadas a asbestos. Generalmente los exámenes médicos incluyen una tomografía computarizada o radiografías de los pulmones y estudios de la función pulmonar. Puede hacerse una broncoscopia (un instrumento con una luz en la punta se usa para ver dentro de los pulmones y remover tejido para una biopsia).
• No hay un tratamiento específico para la asbestosis. El tratamiento puede ayudar a aliviar los síntomas y prevenir complicaciones.
• Evite cualquier contacto futuro con asbestos.
• Pare de fumar. Encuentre una manera que funcione para usted.
• Obtenga cuidado médico para cualquier infección respiratoria, incluyendo un resfriado común.
• Técnicas de terapia física para el pecho serán provistas por un terapeuta respiratorio.
• Aprenda a hacer y a practicar el drenaje bronquial.
• Use un humidificador de rociado frío (si se lo recomiendan) para ayudarle a desprender las secreciones bronquiales, para que pueda expulsarlas con facilidad.
• Mantenga al día las vacunas contra la influenza e infecciones con neumococos.
• Puede necesitar oxígeno suplementario.
• Evite aglomeraciones y personas con infecciones.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a American Lung Association, 61 Broadway, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10006; (800) 586-4872; sitio web: www.lungusa.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Broncodilatadores (de inhalación u orales) pueden ayudar a abrir los tubos bronquiales y permitir el pasaje de aire. Esto es supervisado al principio por un terapeuta de inhalación.
• Para dolores leves, use medicamentos de venta sin receta, tales como paracetamol o aspirina.

ACTIVIDAD
Para preservar la capacidad pulmonar es importante que haga cualquier tipo de ejercicio en forma regular.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de asbestosis.
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos u otros síntomas empeoran, a pesar del tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ASTHMA

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Asthma involves blockage of normal airflow into and out of the lungs. The blockage develops when certain allergens or irritants are inhaled and cause a reaction in the airways. They become swollen (inflamed), produce excess mucus, and the airway muscles tighten. This leads to the wheezing and other symptoms. Asthma affects all ages but 50% of the cases are in children under age 10. Boys with asthma outnumber girls. In adult-onset asthma, women are more often affected.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Chest tightness. Wheezing upon breathing in or out.
• Coughing, especially at night, may have thick, clear or yellow sputum.
• Rapid, shallow breathing that is easier with sitting up.
• Breathing difficulty that gradually gets worse.
• Neck and chest may be sucked in with each breath.
• Severe symptoms of an asthma attack may include:
– Cough that sounds tight and dry.
– Rapid heartbeat and abnormal rapid rate of breathing that becomes more labored.
– Can speak only a few words in one breath.
– Sweating, and much anxiety and distress.

CAUSES
The exact cause remains unclear. Genetic factors, airway sensitivity, and environmental factors appear to play a role. Asthma attacks are due to triggers (e.g., smoke, polluted air, molds, dust, aspirin, cold air, lung infections, and others).

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Other allergies, such as eczema or hay fever.
• Family history of asthma or allergies.
• Exposure to air pollutants.
• Obesity.
• Smoking and exposure to second-hand smoke.
• For adults, exposure to occupational irritants (fumes, gases, latex products, metals, and others).
• Low birth weight.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
No specific preventive measures for original disease. Avoiding risk factors where possible may help.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• Symptoms can be controlled with treatment.
• Half the children will outgrow asthma.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Missed workdays or school absenteeism.
• Problems of stress, depression, or anxiety.
• Pneumonia, pneumothorax, or respiratory failure.
• Status asthmaticus (an attack that cannot be relieved).
• Poorly controlled asthma and chronic symptoms.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms. Medical tests may include x-rays, pulmonary-function tests, an exercise tolerance test, and allergy tests (usually skin testing).
• Treatment will depend on the severity of the symptoms. It may include daily drug therapy, drug therapy for attacks, avoiding triggers, lifestyle changes, self-care, and education. A written treatment plan is usually provided. It should be followed carefully.
• Identify and avoid your particular triggering factors.
• Counseling may help, if asthma is stress-related.
• A peak flow meter may be used at home. It is a small device that measures how well air flows into and out of the airways. You will be instructed on its use.
• Treatment (allergy shots) to desensitize the immune system to specific allergens may be recommended.
• Hospital care may be required for severe attacks.
• To learn more: Asthma & Allergy Foundation of America, 1233 20th St., Suite 402, Washington, DC 20036; (800) 727-8462; website: www.aafa.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Asthma drugs are generally divided into 2 categories:
– Quick relief. These drugs are prescribed for relief of asthma exacerbations and to prevent exercised-induced asthma (EIA) symptoms.
– Long-term control. These drugs are prescribed for use on a daily basis to prevent symptoms.

ACTIVITY

• Stay active. Avoid sudden bursts of activity. Sit and rest if an attack follows exercise. Sip warm water.
• Swimming is a good exercise for asthma patients.

DIET

• No special diet. Avoid foods that are asthma triggers.
• Drink plenty of liquids daily.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of asthma.
• Symptoms don’t improve, despite treatment.
• Peak flow is in a zone that causes you concern.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ASMA (Asthma) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
El asma involucra la obstrucción del flujo normal de aire hacia dentro y fuera de los pulmones. La obstrucción se presenta cuando se inhalan ciertos alérgenos o irritantes y causan una reacción en las vías respiratorias. éstas se hinchan (inflaman), producen mucosidad excesiva y los músculos de las vías respiratorias se estrechan. Esto lleva a una respiración sibilante y otros síntomas. El asma afecta a personas de todas las edades pero el 50% de los casos son niños menores de 10 años. Los niños con asma sobrepasan las niñas. Cuando el asma ocurre en la adultez, las mujeres son afectadas con más frecuencia.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Sensación de opresión en el pecho. Respiración sibilante al exhalar aire.
• Tos con esputo espeso y de color claro o amarillo, especialmente en las noches.
• Respiración rápida y superficial que se alivia cuando se sienta recto.
• Dificultad para respirar que empeora gradualmente.
• Succión en el cuello y el pecho cada vez que respira.
• Los síntomas severos de un ataque de asma pueden incluir:
– Tos con un sonido profundo y seco
– Latidos cardiacos rápidos y ritmo rápido y anormal de la respiración que se hace más forzada
– Puede hablar solamente unas pocas palabras sin tener que tomar aire
– Transpiración y mucha ansiedad y estrés

CAUSAS
La causa exacta del asma sigue sin estar clara. Factores genéticos, sensibilidad de las vías aéreas y factores ambientales parecen jugar un papel. Los ataques de asma se deben a los desencadenantes (p. ej., humo, polución del aire, mohos, polvo, aspirina, aire frío, infecciones del pulmón y otros).

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Otras alergias, tales como eczema o fiebre del heno.
• Antecedentes familiares de asma o alergias.
• Exposición a contaminantes en el aire.
• Obesidad.
• Fumar o estar expuesto al humo del cigarrillo.
• Para los adultos, exposición a irritantes ocupacionales (humo, gases, productos de látex, metales y otros).
• Bajo peso al nacer.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No hay medidas preventivas específicas para el trastorno original. Evite los factores de riesgo cuando sea posible.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• Los síntomas pueden controlarse con tratamiento.
• La mitad de los niños superan el asma.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Perder días de trabajo o ausentismo a la escuela.
• Problemas de estrés, depresión o ansiedad.
• Neumonía, neumotórax o fallo respiratorio.
• Estado asmático (un ataque que no se puede aliviar).
• Pobre control del asma y síntomas crónicos.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir radiografías, exámenes de la función pulmonar, exámenes de la tolerancia al ejercicio y exámenes para identificar los alérgenos (generalmente exámenes de la piel).
• El tratamiento dependerá de la gravedad de los síntomas. Este puede incluir terapia con medicamentos todos los días, terapia con medicamentos para los ataques, evitar lo que provoca ataques, cambios en el estilo de vida, autocuidado y educación. Generalmente se provee un plan de tratamiento escrito, el mismo debe ser seguido cuidadosamente.
• Identifique y evite los factores que pueden provocar los ataques.
• El asesoramiento psicológico puede ayudar, si el asma está relacionado con el estrés.
• En el hogar puede usar un medidor del el flujo máximo. Este es un pequeño aparato que mide cuán bien fluye el aire hacia dentro y hacia fuera de las vías respiratorias. Le indicarán como usarlo.
• Se puede recomendar tratamiento (inyecciones para las alergias) para desensibilizar el sistema inmunológico a alérgenos específicos.
• Se puede necesitar hospitalización para ataques graves.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: Asthma & Allergy Foundation of America, 1233 20th St., Suite 402, Washington, DC 20036; (800) 727-8462; sitio web: www.aafa.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Generalmente los medicamentos para el asma están divididos en 2 categorías:
– Alivio rápido. Estos medicamentos son recetados para la exacerbación del asma y prevenir los síntomas del asma producidos por el ejercicio
– Control a largo plazo. Estos medicamentos son recetados para usarlos diariamente y prevenir los síntomas

ACTIVIDAD

• Permanezca activo. Evite las actividades intensas repentinas. Si al hacer ejercicios vigorosos le sobreviene un ataque, siéntese y repose. Tome agua tibia a sorbos.
• El nadar es un buen ejercicio para los pacientes con asma.

DIETA

• Ninguna en especial. Evite comer alimentos que desencadenan el asma.
• Tome suficientes líquidos diariamente.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de asma.
• Los síntomas no mejoran a pesar del tratamiento.
• El flujo máximo está en una zona que le produce preocupación.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ATELECTASIS

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Atelectasis is the collapse of lung tissue affecting part or all of one lung. It prevents normal lung function. Atelectasis can affect all ages, but is more common in children under age 10.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Sudden, major collapse:
– Chest pain.
– Shortness of breath; rapid breathing.
– Shock (weakness, pale skin, rapid heartbeat).
– Dizziness.
• Gradual collapse:
– Cough.
– Fever.
– Shortness of breath.
– Sometimes, no symptoms are noticed.

CAUSES

• Obstructive atelectasis (most common type):
– Thick mucous plugs from infection or other disease.
– Inhaled objects, such as small toys or peanuts.
– Surgery of the chest (thoracic) or abdomen.
• Nonobstructive atelectasis:
– Pleural effusion (fluid in the lungs).
– Pneumothorax (air in the area around the lung).
– Tumors.
– Lack of surfactant (a substance in the lungs).
– Scarring of lung tissue (due to disease such as asthma or cystic fibrosis).
– Trauma (injury) to the lung.
– Enlarged lymph glands.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Anesthesia.
• Lung diseases (e.g., emphysema, asthma, or cancer).
• Obesity.
• Smoking.
• Injury to the chest.
• Conditions that limit physical activity (e.g., bed rest).

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Medical care to help prevent postsurgical problems.
• Keep small objects that might be inhaled away from young children (such as peanuts).

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Outcome is generally good. It usually resolves with treatment. Complications are rare, but will depend on any underlying cause.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
Infection and chronic lung damage.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam. Medical tests may include blood studies to measure oxygen and carbon dioxide levels, x-rays, or CT of the chest.
• Treatment depends on the cause. It may include drug therapy, chest physical therapy, bronchoscopy, and (rarely) surgery.
• Chest physical therapy may be done to help remove mucous from the lungs. It involves clapping, patting, and massaging the chest and back over the lungs. The lungs may be suctioned with a small plastic tube.
• Bronchoscopy may be done to remove foreign objects or a mucous plug. This involves using an instrument with a lighted tip to see inside the lungs.
• Disabling, chronic atelectasis may have to be treated with surgery to remove the affected part of the lung.
• A tumor may require surgery or radiation therapy.
• To learn more: American Lung Association, 61 Broadway, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10006; (800) 586-4872; website: www.lungusa.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Antibiotics for infection will be prescribed.
• Bronchodilators to assist breathing may be prescribed.
• Pain relievers may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY
Resume your normal activities as soon as symptoms improve. Take frequent showers. Try to avoid low-humidity environments.

DIET
No special diet. Drink plenty of water or other fluids daily to thin lung secretions.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of atelectasis.
• Symptoms return after treatment. Atelectasis can recur.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ATELECTASIA (Atelectasis) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Atelectasia es el colapso del tejido pulmonar y puede afectar parte o la totalidad de un pulmón. Esta impide la función normal del pulmón. La atelectasia puede afectar a personas de todas las edades, pero es más común en niños menores de 10 años.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Colapso masivo súbito:
– Dolor de pecho
– Falta de aire; respiración rápida
– Choque (debilidad, palidez, palpitaciones rápidas)
– Mareos
• Colapso gradual:
– Tos
– Fiebre
– Falta de aire
– Algunas veces, no hay síntomas perceptibles

CAUSAS

• Atelectasia obstructiva (el tipo más común):
– Taponamiento con flema espesa, a causa de una infección u otra enfermedad
– Inhalación de objetos, tales como juguetes pequeños o cacahuates
– Cirugía del pecho (torácica) o abdominal
• Atelectasia no obstructiva:
– Efusión pleural (líquido en los pulmones)
– Neumotórax (aire en el área alrededor de los pulmones)
– Tumores
– Falta del agente flotador (una sustancia en los pulmones)
– Cicatrices en el tejido pulmonar (debido a una enfermedad como asma o fibrosis quística)
– Trauma (lesión) del pulmón
– Glándulas linfáticas engrandecidas

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Anestesia.
• Enfermedades pulmonares (p. ej., enfisema, asma o cáncer).
• Obesidad.
• Fumar.
• Lesión del pecho.
• Condiciones que limitan la actividad física (p. ej., reposo en la cama).

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Cuidado médico para ayudar a prevenir los problemas después de la cirugía.
• Mantenga los objetos pequeños que pueden ser inhalados fuera del alcance de los niños pequeños (tales como los cacahuates).

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Generalmente, el pronóstico es bueno. Generalmente se resuelve con tratamiento. Las complicaciones son raras, pero dependerán de la causa subyacente.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Infección y daño pulmonar crónico.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir análisis de sangre para medir los niveles de oxígeno y dióxido de carbono, radiografías o tomografía computarizada del pecho.
• El tratamiento dependerá de la causa. Puede incluir terapia con medicamentos, terapia física para el pecho, broncoscopia y cirugía (rara vez).
• Puede recibir terapia física del pecho para ayudar a extraer la mucosidad de los pulmones. Ésta consiste de dar palmadas, sobar y masajear el pecho y la espalda sobre los pulmones. Se pueden aspirar los pulmones con un pequeño tubo plástico.
• Se puede hacer una broncoscopia para remover objetos extraños o un tapón de mucosidad. Para esto se utiliza un instrumento con una punta iluminada para ver dentro de los pulmones.
• La atelectasia crónica y que incapacita puede requerir tratamiento con cirugía para extirpar la parte afectada del pulmón.
• Un tumor puede requerir cirugía o terapia de radiación.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: American Lung Association, 61 Broadway, 6th Floor, New York 10006; (800) 586-4872; sitio web: www.lungusa.com .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se recetarán antibióticos para la infección.
• Se pueden recetar broncodilatadores para asistir en la respiración.
• Se pueden recetar analgésicos.

ACTIVIDAD
Reanude las actividades normales tan pronto como los síntomas mejoren. Tome duchas frecuentemente. Trate de evitar los ambientes poco húmedos.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial. Tome bastante agua u otros líquidos diariamente para adelgazar las secreciones pulmonares.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de atelectasia.
• Los síntomas reaparecen después del tratamiento. La atelectasia puede volver a ocurrir.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ATHEROSCLEROSIS (Hardening of the Arteries)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION

• Atherosclerosis is the hardening or narrowing of the arteries. Arteries are blood vessels that carry blood and oxygen to the heart, brain, and other body parts. It can begin in childhood and progress slowly as people age. In some people, it progresses more rapidly. Up to age 45, it is more common in men. After menopause, women are equally affected. Atherosclerosis leads to:
– Coronary artery disease (a risk for heart attack or heart failure).
– Carotid artery disease (a risk for stroke).
– Peripheral artery disease—which affects legs, arms, stomach, or kidneys—(a risk for intermittent claudication (leg cramps), poor wound healing, and infections).
– Aneurysms (a bulge in an artery wall).
– Kidney disease.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Symptoms often are absent until atherosclerosis reaches advanced stages. Symptoms depend on what part of the body has a decreased blood flow and the extent of disease.
• Muscle cramps if it involves blood vessels in the legs.
• Angina pectoris (chest pain) or a heart attack if it involves blood vessels to the heart.
• Stroke or transient ischemic attack if it involves vessels to the neck and brain.
• Abdominal cramps or pain if blood vessels to the abdomen are involved.

CAUSES
Plaque (made up of cholesterol, muscle cells, fibrous tissue, and calcium) builds up on artery walls that have been damaged in some way. Plaque deposits can grow large enough to reduce blood flow and can also crack or break apart and form clots. Clots can block blood flow or travel to another part of the body and cause serious or fatal problems.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• High blood pressure.
• Diabetes.
• High levels of LDL (the bad cholesterol).
• Low levels of HDL (the good cholesterol).
• Obesity and/or lack of physical activity.
• Smoking.
• Family history of atherosclerosis.
• Diet high in saturated fats and trans fatty acids.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Eat a healthy, low-fat, high-fiber diet. Maintain a healthy weight. Exercise regularly. Don’t smoke.
• Control diabetes and high blood pressure.
• Control cholesterol levels.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
There is no cure, but atherosclerosis can be slowed or even partially reversed. If organ damage has developed due to reduced blood flow, the outcome will vary.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Coronary artery disease, which is the number one cause of death in men and women.
• Other disorders as listed in Description.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider may do a physical exam. Questions will be asked about your symptoms, smoking, alcohol use, drug use, exercise, and personal and family medical history. Blood pressure and pulse rate are checked. A stethoscope is used to listen for sounds of blood flow in the arteries. Blood studies are done for cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood sugar. Heart function tests (such as exercise stress tests and coronary calcium scores) and blood flow tests may be done.
• Atherosclerosis treatment includes drug therapy and lifestyle changes. Treatment for organ damage caused by atherosclerosis depends on the organ involved.
• Lifestyle changes include diet changes, losing weight, stop smoking, increasing exercise, and reducing stress.
• Stop smoking. Find a way to quit that works for you.
• To learn more: American Heart Association, local branch listed in telephone directory, or call (800) 242-8721; website: www.americanheart.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Drugs will be prescribed for any diagnosed disorders.
• Cholesterol-lowering drugs are usually prescribed.

ACTIVITY
Activity may depend on state of health. Try to get 30 to 45 minutes of aerobic exercise most days of the week.

DIET
Eat a low-fat, high-fiber diet that includes fruits and vegetables. Begin a weight-loss diet, if overweight.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF
You or a family member has symptoms of, or concerns about, atherosclerosis.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ATEROSCLEROSIS (Endurecimiento de Las Arterias) (Atherosclerosis [Hardening of the Arteries]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION

• La aterosclerosis es un endurecimiento o estrechamiento de las arterias. Las arterias son los vasos sanguíneos que transportan la sangre y el oxígeno al corazón, cerebro y otras partes del cuerpo. Esta puede comenzar en la niñez y progresar lentamente a medida que las personas envejecen. En algunas personas progresa más rápidamente. Hasta los 45 años es más común en los hombres. Después de la menopausia la incidencia en las mujeres es igual que en los hombres. La aterosclerosis lleva a:
– Enfermedad de las arterias coronarias (un riesgo de sufrir un ataque al corazón o insuficiencia cardiaca)
– Enfermedad de la arteria carótida (un factor de riesgo de apoplejía). Enfermedad vascular periférica que afecta las piernas, los brazos, el estómago o los riñones (un riesgo de claudicación intermitente, calambres en las piernas, mala curación de heridas e infecciones)
– Aneurismas (un bulto en la pared de la arteria)
– Enfermedad renal

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• A menudo no se presentan síntomas hasta que la aterosclerosis ha llegado a etapas avanzadas. Los síntomas dependen del sitio en donde disminuya el flujo de sangre y del grado de avance de la enfermedad.
• Calambres musculares si afecta los vasos sanguíneos de las piernas.
• Angina de pecho (dolor de pecho) o un ataque al corazón si afecta los vasos sanguíneos del corazón.
• Apoplejía o isquemia transitoria cuando compromete los vasos sanguíneos del cuello y del cerebro.
• Calambres abdominales o dolor si los vasos sanguíneos del estómago están afectados.

CAUSAS
Placa, que está formada de colesterol, células musculares, tejido fibroso y calcio, se acumula en las paredes arteriales que han sido dañadas de alguna manera. Los depósitos de placa pueden crecer lo suficientemente grandes para reducir el flujo de sangre y pueden también agrietarse o romperse y formar coágulos. Los coágulos pueden bloquear el flujo de sangre o viajar a otras partes del cuerpo y causar problemas serios o fatales.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Presión arterial alta.
• Diabetes.
• Niveles elevados de lipoproteína de baja densidad (el colesterol malo, o LDL, por sus siglas en inglés).
• Niveles bajos de lipoproteína de alta densidad (el colesterol bueno, o HDL, por sus siglas en inglés).
• Obesidad y/o falta de actividad física.
• Fumar.
• Antecedentes familiares de aterosclerosis.
• Dieta alta en grasas saturadas y ácidos grasos trans.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Ingiera una dieta saludable, baja en grasa y rica en fibra. Mantenga un peso saludable. Haga ejercicio regularmente. No fume.
• Controle la diabetes y la presión sanguínea elevada.
• Controle los niveles de colesterol.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Actualmente no hay cura, pero la aterosclerosis se puede retardar o incluso revertir parcialmente. Si han ocurrido daños a los órganos debido a la reducción en el flujo de sangre, el pronóstico variará.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Enfermedad de las arterias coronarias, la cual es la causa número uno de muertes en hombres y mujeres.
• Otros trastornos listados bajo Descripción.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le puede hacer un examen físico. Le preguntarán acerca de los síntomas, fumar, consumo de alcohol, uso de drogas, ejercicio y antecedentes médicos personales y familiares. La presión arterial y los latidos cardiacos serán chequeados. Se usará un estetoscopio para escuchar el flujo sanguíneo en las arterias. Se harán análisis de sangre para verificar los niveles de colesterol, triglicéridos y glucosa. Se pueden hacer exámenes para verificar la función cardiaca (como prueba de esfuerzo y medición de calcio coronario) y el flujo de sangre.
• El tratamiento para la aterosclerosis incluye terapia con medicamentos y cambios en el estilo de vida. El tratamiento para los órganos dañados por la aterosclerosis dependerá del órgano afectado.
• Los cambios en el estilo de vida incluyen cambios en la dieta, pérdida de peso, parar de fumar, aumentar la cantidad de ejercicio, y reducir el estrés.
• Deje de fumar. Encuentre una manera de dejar el cigarrillo que funcione para usted.
• Para más información, diríjase a la oficina local de la American Heart Association, busque su número en su directorio telefónico o llame al (800) 242-8721; sitio web: www.americanheart.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se recetarán medicamentos para cualquier trastorno diagnosticado.
• Por lo general se recetan medicamentos para bajar el colesterol.

ACTIVIDAD
Las actividades dependen de su estado de salud. Trate de hacer ejercicios aeróbicos por 30 a 45 minutos la mayoría de los días de la semana.

DIETA
Ingiera una dieta baja en grasa, rica en fibra y que incluya frutas y vegetales. Comience una dieta de pérdida de peso si tiene sobrepeso.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI
Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de aterosclerosis, o está preocupado acerca de la aterosclerosis.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ATHLETE’S FOOT (Tinea Pedis; Ringworm of the Feet)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Athlete’s foot is a common, contagious fungal (tinea) infection of the skin on the feet. It often affects the soles and skin between toes (often the 4th and 5th toes). It usually affects teens and adults (rare in young children).

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Moist, soft, gray-white or red scales on feet, especially between toes.
• Dead skin between toes.
• Itching in inflamed areas.
• Damp, musty foot odor.
• Small blisters on the feet (sometimes).

CAUSES
Infection by Trichophyton rubrum or other fungus. The germs can be spread by direct contact with an infected person, or by contact with the germs on shoes, socks, shower, or pool surfaces. Animals can also carry the germs and infect a human.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Infrequent changes of shoes or socks.
• Use of locker rooms and public showers.
• Persistent moisture around the feet (e.g., wearing air-tight shoes).
• Hot, humid weather.
• People who have immune system problems due to illness or medications.
• Diabetes.
• People who are more susceptible to the infection.
• Having other fungal infection (e.g., jock itch).

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Bathe feet daily. Dry completely between the toes and apply drying or dusting powder.
• Wear rubber or wooden sandals in public showers.
• Go barefoot when possible.
• Change socks daily and wear socks made of cotton, wool, or other natural, absorbent fibers. Avoid synthetics. Wear shoes that are not air-tight.
• Consider using an antiperspirant on your feet every evening.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Usually curable in 3 weeks with treatment, but recurrence is common. In some cases, the infection is more severe and will take longer to control.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• A bacterial infection may develop in the affected area.
• A skin rash can sometimes develop on the hands and face (rare).

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• After soaking or bathing, carefully remove scales and material between the toes daily.
• Use a hair dryer to blow warm air on the feet to make sure they are completely dry.
• Keep affected areas cool and dry. Go barefoot or wear sandals during treatment. If socks are worn, keep them dry. If they get wet, change to dry ones.
• See your health care provider if the symptoms are severe. Your health care provider can usually diagnose athlete’s foot by looking at the affected skin area. Certain skin tests may be done to rule out other skin disorders.

MEDICATIONS

• Use nonprescription antifungal powders, creams, or ointments (such as terbinafine). Follow instructions on the product.
• For severe cases, you may be prescribed oral, or stronger topical antifungal drugs.
• Antibiotics may be prescribed if a bacterial infection develops.

ACTIVITY
No limits. Avoid activities that cause feet to sweat until healing is complete.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of athlete’s foot that persist, despite self-treatment.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on back of this page

PIE DE ATLETA (Tinea Pedis) (Athlete’s Foot [Tinea Pedis; Ringworm of the Feet]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
El pie de atleta es una infección fúngica (tiña), común y contagiosa de la piel de los pies. Frecuentemente afecta las plantas de los pies y la piel entre los dedos (a menudo entre el 4° y 5° dedos) de los pies. Por lo general afecta a adolescentes y adultos (es rara en los niños).

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Costras húmedas, blandas, de color gris blancuzco o rojo en los pies, especialmente entre los dedos.
• Piel muerta entre los dedos.
• Picazón en las áreas inflamadas.
• Olor a humedad o moho en los pies.
• Ampollas pequeñas en los pies (algunas veces).

CAUSAS
Infección por Tricophyton rubrum u otros hongos. Los gérmenes se esparcen por contacto directo con una persona infectada o por contacto con los gérmenes en zapatos, calcetines, superficies de duchas o piscinas. Los animales también pueden transportar el germen e infectar a los seres humanos.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• No cambiarse los zapatos ni calcetines con frecuencia.
• Usar duchas y cuartos de vestuarios públicos.
• Humedad persistente alrededor de los pies (p. ej., por usar zapatos sin ventilación adecuada).
• Tiempo húmedo y cálido.
• Personas que tienen problemas con el sistema inmunológico debido a enfermedades o medicamentos.
• Personas que son más susceptibles a infecciones.
• Padecer de otras infecciones fúngicas.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Lávese los pies diariamente. Séquese completamente entre los dedos y aplíquese talco para mantenerlos secos.
• Use sandalias de goma o suecos cuando se duche en un baño público.
• Permanezca descalzo tanto como le sea posible.
• Cámbiese los calcetines todos los días y use solo calcetines de algodón, lana o cualquier otra fibra natural absorbente. Evite usar calcetines de fibras sintéticas. Evite los zapatos que se cierran demasiado y no proveen ventilación.
• Considere el uso de un antitranspirante en sus pies cada noche.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Por lo general se cura dentro de las 3 semanas de tratamiento, pero es común que se repita. En algunos casos la infección es más seria y llevará más tiempo el controlarla.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Una infección bacteriana se puede desarrollar en el área afectada.
• Se puede desarrollar una erupción en la piel de las manos y la cara (rara vez).

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Después de bañarse o lavarse, quítese con cuidado las costras y material entre los dedos de los pies, diariamente.
• Use un secador de pelo para soplar aire tibio en los pies para asegurarse que están completamente secos.
• Mantenga los sitios afectados secos y frescos. Durante el tratamiento permanezca descalzo o use sandalias. Si los zapatos se mojan cámbielos a unos secos.
• Vea a su proveedor de atención médica si los síntomas son graves. El puede por lo general diagnosticar el pie de atleta con tan solo mirar el área afectada. Ciertos exámenes de la piel pueden ser requeridos para eliminar la posibilidad de otros trastornos de la piel.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Aplíquese polvos, pomadas o ungüentos antifúngicos de venta sin receta (tales como terbinafine). Siga las instrucciones del producto.
• Para casos graves, le pueden recetar medicamentos orales o medicamentos tópicos antifúngicos más fuertes.
• Se le pueden prescribir antibióticos si se desarrolla una infección bacteriana.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin restricciones. Evite las actividades que le hagan sudar los pies hasta que esté completamente curado.

DIETA
Ninguna especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de pie de atleta que persisten, después del autocuidado.
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Atrial fibrillation is an abnormal heart rhythm. Fibrillation is a “quivering” of muscles. Atrial pertains to the atria, the upper chambers of the heart. An abnormal rhythm reduces the flow of blood through the heart to the brain and other body parts. It usually affects older adults and men more than women.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• There may be no symptoms.
• Irregular and often rapid beating of the heart.
• Weakness, dizziness, shortness of breath, chest pain, or faintness may occur.

CAUSES
The heart has an electrical system that controls the heart rate and the heart’s contractions. The average heart beats at a rate of 60 to 100 times per minute. With atrial fibrillation, the electrical system does not function as it should. The atria quiver instead of contracting and the heart rate increases (may exceed 160 beats a minute). There are different risk factors that can lead to atrial fibrillation and sometimes no cause is found.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Increased age.
• Coronary heart disease.
• High blood pressure.
• Abnormal heart muscle.
• Mitral valve disease.
• Hyperthyroidism.
• Lung disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, emphysema).
• Pericarditis (heart lining inflammation).
• Pulmonary embolism.
• Congestive heart failure
• Recent heart or lung surgery.
• Use of stimulant drugs (cocaine, decongestants).
• Excessive alcohol use.
• Congenital (present at birth) heart abnormality.
• Lone atrial fibrillation in young, healthy adults.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
No specific preventive measures. Avoid risk factors where possible.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
It can often be controlled with treatment. Atrial fibrillation tends to become a chronic condition.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Stroke.
• Arterial thrombosis or embolus (blood clots).
• Congestive heart failure.
• Other heartbeat irregularities can lead to cardiac arrest.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms. A stethoscope (device for listening to body sounds) is used to detect heart rhythms. Medical tests may include blood studies, an electrocardiogram, and other heart function tests.
• Treatment is aimed at treating the cause of the atrial fibrillation, slowing the heart rate, converting the abnormal rhythm to normal, preventing a recurrence, and preventing complications.
• Treatment steps may include drug therapy, electrocardioversion, surgery, and other procedures.
• Abnormal heart rhythm may be converted to normal rhythm with drug therapy or with electric shock (electrocardioversion). An electric shock stops the abnormal activity and allows the normal rhythm to take over.
• Recurring atrial fibrillation may be treated with a variety of procedures. These include a pacemaker or atrial defibrillator implantation, AV node ablation, Maze procedure (atrial surgery), and pulmonary vein isolation.
• Some patients may be left in atrial fibrillation long-term if the heart rate is under control.
• To learn more: American Heart Association, local branch listed in telephone directory, or call (800) 242-8721; website: www.americanheart.org .

MEDICATIONS
Drugs may be prescribed for the underlying risk factor, to slow the heart rate, maintain normal heart rhythm, and to prevent blood clots.

ACTIVITY
Aim for 20 to 30 minutes of aerobic exercise 3 or more days a week. Activity may depend on your health status.

DIET
Eat a low-fat, high-fiber diet that includes fruits and vegetables. Begin a weight loss diet, if overweight.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has atrial fibrillation symptoms.
• Any change in heart rate, chest pain, weakness, shortness of breath, or swollen feet and ankles occurs.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

FIBRILACION AURICULAR (Atrial Fibrillation) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La fibrilación auricular es un ritmo cardiaco irregular. La fibrilación es un temblor de los músculos. Auricular significa que corresponde a las aurículas, que son las cámaras superiores del corazón. Un latido cardiaco irregular reduce el flujo sanguíneo que pasa por el corazón hacia el cerebro y otras partes del cuerpo. Por lo general afecta a personas mayores y a más hombres que mujeres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Puede no haber ningún síntoma.
• Latidos cardiacos irregulares y frecuentemente rápidos
• Debilidad, mareos, falta de aire, dolor de pecho o desmayo pueden ocurrir

CAUSAS
El corazón tiene un sistema eléctrico que controla sus latidos y contracciones. El promedio de latidos del corazón es de 60 a 100 latidos por minuto. En la fibrilación auricular, el sistema eléctrico no funciona como debiera. La aurícula tiembla en lugar de contraerse, y los latidos cardiacos aumentan (pueden alcanzar 160 latidos por minuto). Hay diferentes factores de riesgo que pueden conducir a la fibrilación auricular y en algunas ocasiones no se encuentra la causa.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Edad avanzada
• Enfermedad coronaria del corazón
• Presión arterial elevada
• Músculo del corazón anormal
• Enfermedad de la válvula mitral
• Hipertiroidismo
• Enfermedad pulmonar (enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica, enfisema)
• Pericarditis (inflamación del revestimiento cardiaco)
• Embolia pulmonar
• Fallo cardiaco congestivo
• Cirugía del corazón o pulmón reciente
• Uso de drogas estimulantes (cocaína, descongestionantes)
• Consumo excesivo de alcohol
• Anormalidades del corazón congénitas (presentes al nacimiento)
• Fibrilación auricular sola en adultos jóvenes y saludables

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No hay medidas preventivas específicas. Evite los factores de riesgo cuando sea posible.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Frecuentemente puede controlarse con tratamiento. La fibrilación auricular tiende a convertirse en un trastorno crónico.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Apoplejía
• Trombosis o embolia arterial (coágulos de sangre)
• Fallo cardiaco congestivo
• Otras irregularidades de los latidos cardiacos que pueden provocar un paro cardiaco

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas. Se usa un estetoscopio (un aparato para escuchar los sonidos corporales) para detectar el ritmo del corazón. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir análisis de sangre, un electrocardiograma y otros exámenes de la función cardiaca
• El tratamiento está dirigido a tratar la causa de la fibrilación auricular, disminuir el latido cardiaco, convertir el ritmo anormal en uno normal, prevenir la recurrencia y prevenir las complicaciones
• Las medidas del tratamiento pueden incluir terapia con medicamentos, electrocardioversión, cirugía y otros procedimientos
• El ritmo cardiaco anormal puede convertirse en uno normal con terapia con medicamentos o choques eléctricos (electrocardioversión). Un choque eléctrico detiene la actividad anormal y permite que el ritmo normal tome lugar
• La fibrilación auricular recurrente puede tratarse con una variedad de procedimientos. Estos incluyen un marcapaso o un desfibrilador auricular implantado, ablación del nódulo AV, procedimiento de Maze (cirugía auricular) y aislamiento de la vena pulmonar
• Algunos pacientes se pueden dejar con la fibrilación auricular por periodo largo de tiempo si los latidos cardiacos están bajo control
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a la oficina local de la American Heart Association, cuyo número de teléfono puede encontrar en el directorio telefónico, o llame al (800) 242-8721; sitio web: www.americanheart.org

MEDICAMENTOS
Se pueden recetar medicamentos para los factores de riesgo subyacentes, disminuir los latidos cardiacos, mantener un ritmo cardiaco normal y prevenir la formación de coágulos.

ACTIVIDAD
Trate de hacer ejercicios aeróbicos de 20 a 30 minutos tres o más días a la semana. Las actividades dependerán de su estado de salud.

DIETA
Ingiera una dieta baja en grasa y rica en fibras que incluya frutas y vegetales. Comience una dieta de pérdida de peso si tiene sobrepeso.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de fibrilación auricular
• Ocurre cualquier cambio en el ritmo cardiaco, dolor de pecho, debilidad, falta de aire o hinchazón en los pies y tobillos
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER (ADHD)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a consistent pattern of behavior that includes inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. It is called ADD (attention deficit disorder) without hyperactivity. ADHD is common in children. Symptoms usually appear before age 7. Males are more often affected. It can affect adults.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Squirms in seat; fidgets with hands or feet.
• Unable to stay seated when required to do so.
• Easily distracted.
• Blurts out answers before a question is finished.
• Difficulty waiting turn in games and lines.
• Difficulty following instructions.
• Unable to sustain attention in work or play activities.
• Shifts from one uncompleted project to another.
• Difficulty playing quietly. Talks excessively.
• Interrupts or intrudes on others.
• Doesn’t appear to listen.
• Loses items needed for tasks.
• Often engages in dangerous activities without considering consequences.

CAUSES
Unknown. Many theories have been proposed. Genetic and environmental factors appear to play a role.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Family history of the disorder.
• Males more than females.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
No specific preventive measures known.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Most people don’t outgrow ADHD, but do learn to adapt and live fulfilling lives.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
Later problems may occur, such as school failure, antisocial behavior, and (sometimes) criminal behavior.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• The child’s teacher may be the first to notice the behavior. A school psychologist, your child’s doctor, or a special health care provider may diagnose the disorder. Several methods are used to help make the diagnosis. These include observing the child doing activities, mental, social, and intelligence tests, parent’s and teacher’s evaluation, and rating scales about behaviors.
• Adults are diagnosed based on their performance at work and at home. When possible, their parents rate how the person behaved as a child.
• Treatment for children includes appropriate classroom setting, behavior therapy, drug therapy, and help for parents in managing the child’s behavior. A combination of these techniques will have the best outcome.
• Adult patients may have drug therapy and counseling.
• Counseling can help, as can behavior and cognitive therapy. These help child and adult patients focus on ways to change the undesired behavior.
• Help your child at home by providing a structured environment, well-defined behavior limits, and consistent use of parenting techniques.
• Special education classes for all or part of the day may be needed for some children.
• Stay in close contact with the child’s teacher. Arrange for extra lessons or tutoring if the child needs help.
• Support groups or parenting skills training are helpful.
• To learn more: Children & Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD), 8181 Professional Pl., Suite 150, Landover, MD 20785; (800) 233-4050; website: www.chadd.org .

MEDICATION

• Stimulant drugs (have a calming affect on persons with ADHD) or other drugs approved for ADHD may be prescribed. Some of these drugs have side effects, such as sleep problems, depression, headache, stomach ache, loss of appetite, and stunted growth.
• Antidepressants may be prescribed for adults.

ACTIVITY
Structure your child’s activity to the extent possible.

DIET
Most medical research indicates that special diets benefit very few children. Many parents, however, report dramatic changes in behavior after this treatment. This change may result from the extra attention the child receives with preparation of special meals. Discuss any special diets with your child’s health care provider.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You believe your child or a family member has symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
• Symptoms become worse after treatment is started.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

TRASTORNO POR DEFICIT DE ATENCION CON HIPERACTIVIDAD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder [ADHD]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
El trastorno por déficit de atención con hiperactividad (TDAH o ADHD, por sus siglas en inglés) es un patrón consistente de comportamiento que incluye la falta de atención, hiperactividad e impulsividad. Cuando carece de hiperactividad, es llamado trastorno por déficit de atención (ADD, por sus siglas en inglés). El trastorno por déficit de atención con hiperactividad (TDHA) es común en niños. Los síntomas generalmente aparecen antes de los 7 años de edad. Afecta a niños varones con mayor frecuencia. También puede afectar a adultos.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Retorcerse en el asiento; juguetear con las manos o los pies.
• Incapaz de permanecer sentado cuando le es requerido.
• Se distrae fácilmente.
• Cuando se le hace una pregunta, contesta antes de que la pregunta termine.
• Dificultad para esperar su turno en juegos y líneas.
• Dificultad para seguir instrucciones.
• Incapaz de mantener la atención en actividades laborales o recreativas.
• Cambia de un proyecto incompleto a otro.
• Dificultad para jugar silenciosamente. Habla excesivamente.
• Interrumpe o molesta a otros.
• No aparenta escuchar.
• Pierde artículos necesarios para las tareas.
• Se involucra en actividades peligrosas con frecuencia sin considerar las consecuencias.

CAUSAS
Desconocidas. Muchas teorías han sido propuestas. Tanto factores genéticos como ambientales parecen jugar un rol.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Antecedentes familiares del trastorno.
• Es más frecuente en varones que en niñas.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No existe ninguna medida preventiva específica conocida.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
La mayoría de las personas no superan el TDAH, pero aprenden a adaptarse y vivir una vida plena.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Más adelante, pueden ocurrir problemas, tales como el fracaso escolar, el comportamiento antisocial y (a veces) el comportamiento criminal.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• El maestro del niño puede ser el primero en notar el comportamiento. El psicólogo de la escuela, el médico del niño o un proveedor especialista de atención médica pueden diagnosticar el trastorno. Varios métodos son utilizados para ayudar a determinar el diagnóstico. Estos incluyen la observación del niño mientras realiza actividades, exámenes mentales, sociales y de inteligencia, evaluación de los padres y de los maestros y escalas para clasificar el comportamiento.
• Los adultos son diagnosticados en base a su desempeño en el trabajo y en el hogar. Cuando es posible, los padres clasifican el comportamiento que la persona tuvo cuando era un niño.
• El tratamiento para los niños incluye un entorno apropiado en el salón de clase, terapia de comportamiento, terapia con medicamentos y ayuda para los padres para manejar el comportamiento del niño. Una combinación de estas técnicas tendrá el mejor resultado.
• Los pacientes adultos pueden tener una terapia con medicamentos y terapia psicológica.
• La terapia psicológica puede ayudar, al igual que la terapia cognitiva y de comportamiento. Estas ayudan al niño y a los pacientes adultos a enfocarse en maneras de cambiar el comportamiento no deseado.
• Ayude a su niño en el hogar proveyendo un ambiente estructurado, límites de comportamiento bien definidos y un uso consistente de las técnicas de crianza.
• Las clases de educación especial por todo o parte del día pueden ser necesarias para algunos niños.
• Manténgase en contacto cercano con el maestro del niño. Si el niño necesita ayuda, establezca lecciones adicionales o particulares.
• Los grupos de apoyo o entrenamiento de habilidades de crianza son beneficiosos.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: Children & Adults with Attention Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD), 8181 Professional Pl., Suite 150, Landover, MD 20785; (800) 233-4050; sitio web: www.chadd.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se pueden recetar medicamentos estimulantes (tienen un efecto calmante en personas con TDAH), u otros medicamentos aprobados para TDAH. Algunos de estos medicamentos pueden producir efectos secundarios, tales como problemas para dormir, depresión, dolores de cabeza, dolores de estómago, pérdida de apetito y crecimiento atrofiado.
• A los adultos se les puede recetar medicamentos antidepresivos.

ACTIVIDAD
Organice las actividades de su hijo tanto como sea posible.

DIETA
La mayoría de la investigación médica indica que las dietas especiales benefician a muy pocos niños. Muchos padres, al contrario, han reportado cambios dramáticos en el comportamiento después de este tratamiento. Este cambio puede ser el resultado de la atención adicional que el niño recibe con la preparación de comidas especiales. Discuta cualquier dieta especial con el proveedor de atención médica de su hijo.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted cree que su hijo u otro miembro de su familia presentan los síntomas del trastorno por déficit de atención con hiperactividad.
• Los síntomas empeoran después de comenzar el tratamiento.
• Aparecen síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos utilizados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

AUTISM

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Autism is a disorder that involves the way a child develops. It is usually discovered by the time a child is age 2 and a half, but could be later. Parents may notice that an infant or child is not behaving, talking, playing, or learning new skills as expected for their age group. Asperger’s syndrome is like autism, but without the disabilities. It can range from mild to severe.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Does not talk or may talk using nonsense words. May use a sing-song voice and repeat what they hear. Unable to carry on a conversation.
• Does not respond to name and avoids eye contact.
• Is over active. Wants to play alone. Does not smile.
• Repeats the same movements over and over such as rocking and flapping or twisting hands.
• Has special routines and does not like change.
• Does not want to be touched, such as being cuddled.
• May injure self by head-banging or biting.
• Is bothered by noises.
• Overly interested in lights or moving objects.

CAUSES
Unknown. It appears to have a genetic basis, but nongenetic factors are also involved. It is known that parents do not cause autism. There is no scientific proof to link childhood vaccines to autism.

RISK INCREASES WITH
Unknown. It does affect boys more than girls.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
None known. Autism cannot currently be detected at birth or through any prenatal tests.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
The future is unknown for most autistic children. A child may be mentally retarded, have normal intelligence, or even have a genius-like ability. As they get older, their symptoms may improve, stay about the same, or worsen. Some children will need supervision for life. Some may be able to live independently.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Parents of an autistic child have an increased risk of having another child with the disorder.
• Stress for the family raising an autistic child.
• Autistic children are at a higher risk for seizures.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Diagnosis is difficult, as the signs and symptoms may appear to be caused by another disorder or problem. There is no specific test for autism. Your health care provider (usually a mental health professional) will perform an exam of your child and ask you about your child’s behavior and other signs or symptoms you may have observed. Tests for speech and other skills may be done to see how your child is developing compared to normal levels for his or her age group.
• Treatment for autism should be started as soon as a child is diagnosed. Speech and behavior therapy and social skills training will help children with autism.
• There is no cure for autism. Treatments can help with many of the symptoms. The treatment plan for each child will depend on how mild or severe their symptoms are. Some children may be able to attend regular public schools. Others may require a special classroom.
• The treatment steps take time and patience. Different treatment methods may need to be tried for a child.
• Parents should join an autism family support group.
• Counseling may help some parents cope with the stress involved with raising an autistic child.
• New treatments for autism are being studied and may be recommended for your child in the future. There are certain treatments that parents or others have tried and found to work for one or a few children. These treatments may or may not work for other autistic children. Always talk to your child’s health care provider before you try any new type of treatment.
• To learn more: Autism Society of America, 7910 Woodmount Avenue, Suite 300, Bethesda, MD 20814-3015; (800) 328-8476; www.autism-society.org .

MEDICATIONS
There are no drugs that specifically treat autism. Research is ongoing. Drugs may be prescribed for certain symptoms (e.g., self-injury behavior, aggression, hyperactivity, or others).

ACTIVITY
Help your child to stay as physically active as possible.

DIET
Special diets will not improve the symptoms of autism.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• Your child is not developing as expected for the age.
• After diagnosis, your child develops new symptoms or other symptoms worsen, despite treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

AUTISMO (Autism) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
El autismo es un trastorno que afecta la manera en que un niño se desarrolla. Generalmente ya se ha descubierto cuando el niño tiene dos años y medio, pero podría ser más tarde. Los padres pueden notar que el infante o el niño no se comporta, no habla, no juega o no aprende nuevas destrezas según se espera para su edad. El síndrome de Asperger es parecido al autismo, pero sin la discapacidad. Puede variar de leve a grave.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• No habla o habla usando palabras que no tienen sentido. Puede usar una voz monótona y repetir lo que escucha. No puede llevar una conversación.
• No responde a su nombre y evita el contacto visual.
• Es hiperactivo. Quiere jugar a solas. No sonríe.
• Repite los mismos movimientos una y otra vez tales como el mecerse y aleteo o retorcimiento de las manos.
• Tiene rutinas especiales y no le gusta cambiarlas.
• No le gusta ser tocado, tal como ser abrazado.
• Puede lesionarse a sí mismo golpeándose en la cabeza o mordiéndose.
• Le molestan los ruidos.
• Demasiado interesado en luces u objetos en movimiento.

CAUSAS
Desconocidas. Parece tener una base genética, pero factores no genéticos también están involucrados. Se sabe que los padres no causan el autismo. No hay ninguna evidencia científica que conecte las vacunas de la niñez con el autismo.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON
Se desconoce. Afecta a los niños más que a las niñas.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No se conoce ninguna. En la actualidad el autismo no se puede detectar al nacer o por análisis prenatales.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Se desconoce el futuro para la mayoría de los niños autistas. Un niño puede estar retrasado mentalmente, tener inteligencia normal o incluso tener habilidad de genio. A medida que crecen, los síntomas pueden mejorar, mantenerse iguales o empeorar. Algunos niños necesitarán supervisión por el resto de su vida; otros pueden ser capaces de vivir independientemente.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Los padres de un niño autista tienen un alto riesgo de tener otro niño con el trastorno.
• Estrés para la familia criando a un niño autista.
• Los niños autistas tienen un alto riesgo de convulsiones.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• El diagnóstico es difícil, ya que los signos y síntomas pueden parecer ser causados por otro trastorno o problema.
• No hay una prueba específica para el autismo. Su proveedor de atención médica (generalmente un profesional de la salud mental) examinará al niño y preguntará acerca del comportamiento del niño y de los otros signos o síntomas que usted puede haber observado. Se pueden hacer pruebas del habla y de otras destrezas para ver cómo el niño se está desarrollando en comparación con los niveles normales para su edad.
• El tratamiento para autismo debe comenzarse tan pronto como el niño sea diagnosticado. La terapia del habla y del comportamiento, así como el entrenamiento en habilidades sociales ayudarán a los niños con autismo.
• No hay cura para el autismo. Los tratamientos pueden ayudar con muchos de los síntomas. El plan de tratamiento para cada niño dependerá de cuán leves o severos sean los síntomas. Algunos niños pueden asistir a escuelas públicas regulares. Otros requieren educación especial.
• Las medidas de tratamiento toman tiempo y paciencia. Puede ser necesario tratar diferentes métodos de tratamiento para el niño.
• Los padres deben unirse a un grupo de apoyo familiar para autismo.
• La terapia psicológica puede ayudar a algunos padres a manejar el estrés del criar un niño autista.
• Se están estudiando nuevos tratamientos para el autismo y pueden recomendarse para su niño en el futuro. Hay ciertos tratamientos que los padres u otros han tratado y han encontrado efectivos para un o unos pocos niños. Estos tratamientos pueden o no funcionar para otro niño autista. Siempre hable con el proveedor de atención médica de su niño antes de probar cualquier tipo de tratamiento nuevo.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: Autism Society of America, 7910 Woodmount Avenue, Suite 300, Bethesda, MD 20814-3015; (800) 328-8476; sitio web: www.autism-society.org .

MEDICAMENTOS
No existen medicamentos específicos para tratar el autismo. Continúa la investigación. Se pueden prescribir medicamentos para ciertos síntomas (p. ej., comportamiento de autolesión, agresión, hiperactividad u otros).

ACTIVIDAD
Ayude a su niño a mantenerse tan físicamente activo como sea posible.

DIETA
Las dietas especiales no mejorarán los síntomas del autismo.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Su niño no se está desarrollando como se espera para su edad.
• Después del diagnóstico, su niño desarrolla síntomas nuevos o los otros síntomas empeoran a pesar del tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página
B

BACK PAIN, LOW

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Low back pain is pain and stiffness that affects the lower part of the back (the area from the rib cage to the tailbone). It is usually acute (lasting a few days to a few weeks). It is a common health problem and can affect anyone at anytime, but often occurs in ages 20 to 65.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Symptoms may develop quickly or have a slow onset.
• Pain, stiffness, and soreness in the lower back. It may be ongoing, or only occur when you are in certain positions. The pain may get worse by coughing, sneezing, bending, or twisting.
• The symptoms may occur in a cycle, starting with a muscle spasm; the spasm then causes pain; the pain results in another muscle spasm.
• Sciatica (pain that runs down the leg) in some cases.

CAUSES

• It is usually caused by sprains or strains that can affect the lower back’s muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves, joints, discs, and bones. This back pain is sometimes referred to as nonspecific low back pain as it is unclear just what part(s) of the lower back are causing the pain. (Even x-rays and other tests are often not helpful.)
• Specific back pain is less common. It can be caused by disorders such as spinal stenosis or arthritis.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Ages 20 to 65.
• Family history of back pain.
• Previous back injury, back surgery, or spine problem.
• Overweight.
• Smoking.
• Poor body mechanics and poor posture.
• Work or tasks that require a lot of sitting or heavy lifting, bending or twisting, or repetitive motions.
• Bone and joint conditions of the back.
• Injury or a fracture.
• Congenital problem (being born with).
• Pregnancy.
• Certain sports or recreational activities.
• Emotional factors (e.g., stress, depression, others).

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Low back pain cannot always be prevented.
• Exercise (both aerobic and strength-building).
• Lift heavy objects carefully. Use good posture. Lose weight, if overweight. Don’t smoke.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
In most cases, it is not a serious condition and symptoms clear up in 2 to 4 weeks.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
Chronic or recurring low back pain.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your back pain symptoms and activities. Medical tests may be done in some cases. Tests may include x-rays, CT, or MRI.
• The treatment that works best for most people is a combination of self-care and drug therapy (to help relieve symptoms).
• Medical studies show that staying more active is often better for back disorders than prolonged bed rest.
• An ice pack, cold massage, heating pad, or warm compress applied to the area may help to reduce pain.
• Stop smoking. Find a plan that will help you quit.
• Counseling may help (e.g., for depression or stress).
• Other therapy options may help some people. These can include massage, chiropractic care, yoga, acupuncture, ultrasound, or electrical nerve stimulation.
• Surgery for disk damage may rarely be needed.
• To learn more: National Institute of Arthritis & Musculoskeletal & Skin Disorders, (877) 226-4267; website: www.niams.nih.gov .

MEDICATIONS

• Use nonprescription pain drugs such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or acetaminophen.
• Stronger pain drugs, anti-inflammatories, muscle relaxants, or antidepressants may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY

• Resume your usual activities as soon as possible.
• Avoid or limit any bed rest (no more than 1 to 2 days).
• As pain eases, begin an exercise program. Focus on back and abdominal strength, flexibility, and posture.
• Physical therapy may be prescribed.

DIET
No special diet. A weight-loss diet is usually recommended if being overweight is a problem.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has low back pain and self-care does not help.
• Back pain is severe or recurs. New symptoms occur.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

DOLOR EN LA ESPALDA BAJA (Back Pain, Low) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Dolor en la espalda baja y rigidez que afecta la parte baja de la espalda (el área que va desde la caja torácica hasta el cóccix). Generalmente es un dolor agudo (que dura de unos pocos días a varias semanas). Es un problema de salud muy común y puede afectarle a cualquiera en cualquier momento, pero a menudo ocurre entre los 20 y 65 años de edad.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Los síntomas pueden desarrollarse rápidamente o comenzar lentamente.
• Dolor, rigidez y sensibilidad en la espalda baja. Puede ser constante o solo producirse cuando está en ciertas posiciones. El dolor puede empeorar cuando tose, estornuda, se inclina o gira.
• Los síntomas pueden presentarse en un ciclo, comenzando con un espasmo muscular; luego el espasmo causa dolor; el dolor resulta en otro espasmo muscular.
• Ciática (dolor a lo largo de la pierna) en algunos casos.

CAUSAS

• Generalmente es el resultado de un esfuerzo violento o torcedura que puede afectar los músculos de la espalda baja, los tendones, los ligamentos, los nervios, las articulaciones, los discos y los huesos. A veces se le llama dolor no específico de la espalda baja ya que no está claro qué parte(s) de la espalda baja produce(n) el dolor. (A menudo ni las radiografías ni otras pruebas pueden ayudar).
• El dolor específico de la espalda baja es menos común. Puede ser ocasionado por trastornos como la estenosis espinal o la artritis.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• 20 a 65 años de edad.
• Antecedentes familiares de dolor de espalda.
• Previa lesión de la espalda, cirugía de la espalda o problemas de la columna vertebral.
• Sobrepeso.
• Fumar.
• Mala mecánica corporal y mala postura.
• Empleo o tareas que requieren estar sentado por mucho tiempo o el levantamiento de objetos pesados, agacharse o torcerse, o movimientos repetitivos.
• Problemas de los huesos y articulaciones de la espalda.
• Lesión o fractura.
• Problemas congénitos (hereditarios).
• Embarazo.
• Ciertos deportes o actividades recreacionales.
• Factores emocionales (p. ej., estrés, depresión, otros).

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• El dolor de la espalda baja no siempre se puede prevenir.
• Ejercicio (tanto aeróbicos como para ganar fuerza).
• Levante objetos pesados con mucho cuidado. Mantenga una buena postura. Pierda peso, si tiene sobrepeso. No fume.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
En la mayoría de los casos no es una condición grave y los síntomas desaparecen en 2 a 4 semanas.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Dolor crónico o recurrente de la espalda baja.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de salud le hará un examen físico y le hará preguntas sobre sus síntomas de dolor de la espalda baja y sobre sus actividades. En algunos casos se harán pruebas médicas. Las pruebas pueden incluir radiografías, tomografía computarizada o resonancia magnética.
• El tratamiento que da los mejores resultados para la mayoría de la gente es una combinación de autocuidado y terapia de medicamentos (para ayudar a aliviar los síntomas).
• Estudios médicos indican que mantenerse más activo es a menudo mejor para los trastornos de la espalda que el reposo prolongado en cama.
• Una bolsa de hielo, masajes fríos, una almohadilla eléctrica, o la aplicación de compresas calientes en el área pueden ayudar a reducir el dolor.
• Deje de fumar. Encuentre un programa que le ayude a dejar de fumar.
• La terapia le puede ayudar (p. ej., para la depresión o estrés).
• Otras opciones terapéuticas le pueden ser de ayuda a algunas personas. Estas pueden incluir masaje, tratamiento quiropráctico, yoga, acupuntura, ultrasonido, o estimulación eléctrica de los nervios.
• Raramente se necesitará cirugía por un disco lesionado.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: National Institute of Arthritis & Musculoskeletal & Skin Disorders, (877) 226-4267; sitio web: www.niams.nih.gov .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Use medicamentos analgésicos sin prescripción como la aspirina, ibuprofeno o paracetamol.
• Se le pueden prescribir medicamentos más potentes contra el dolor, relajantes musculares, antiinflamatorios o antidepresivos.

ACTIVIDAD

• Reanude sus actividades normales tan pronto como sea posible.
• Evite o limite su reposo en cama (no más de 1 a 2 días).
• Cuando cesa el dolor, comience un programa de ejercicios. Concéntrese en fortalecer la espalda y el abdomen, la flexibilidad y la postura.
• Se le puede prescribir fisioterapia.

DIETA
No se requiere una dieta especial. Generalmente se recomienda una dieta para adelgazar si el sobrepeso es un problema.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene dolor de la espalda baja y el autocuidado no ayuda.
• El dolor de espalda es severo o retorna. Aparecen nuevos síntomas.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BALANITIS

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Balanitis is an inflammation of the glans (head) of the penis and sometimes the foreskin as well. It is a common condition in males. It occurs more often in males who have a foreskin (have not been circumcised).

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Tenderness, redness, itching, and swelling of the head of the penis.
• Inflammation of the foreskin.
• Unable to retract foreskin (phimosis).
• Impotence.
• Discharge from the penis.
• Burning during urination (rare).

CAUSES
The inflammation is a reaction to infection (most common cause), injury, or irritation of the penis. Sometimes the cause is unknown.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Diabetes.
• Poor hygiene.
• Allergy to chemicals in clothing, contraceptive cream, or condom latex.
• Reaction to certain drugs.
• Trauma or minor injury to the foreskin and penis.
• Presence of foreskin.
• Sexual partner affected by vaginitis (rare).
• Being very obese.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Wash daily with soap and water and wash after sexual intercourse. Clean carefully under the foreskin.
• Control diabetes or other medical conditions.
• Weight loss for obese males.
• Using a latex condom during intercourse may help to prevent some infections.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Usually curable in 1 to 2 weeks with treatment.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Chronic inflammation can cause:
– Scarring and narrowing of the opening of the penis (urethral stricture).
– Phimosis (difficult to retract the foreskin).
– Paraphimosis (unable to replace the foreskin to cover the head of the penis).
– Urinary tract infection.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider can usually diagnose the disorder by an exam of the penis. A culture of the discharge from the penis and tests for other medical disorders (such as diabetes) may be done. If balanitis persists, a biopsy (tissue sample is removed for an exam) may be done to rule out cancer.
• Treatment usually involves drugs applied to the penis and practicing good hygiene.
• Use warm-water soaks to relieve pain or discomfort.
• A foreskin that cannot be retracted may be treated with topical steroid drugs, stretching techniques (done 2 to 3 weeks), or by a special slit made in the foreskin.
• Surgery may be recommended to circumcise the penis if balanitis recurs often or scar tissue develops.

MEDICATIONS

• Antibiotics to be applied to the penis are usually prescribed. Rarely, antibiotics to be taken by mouth may be prescribed.
• Steroid skin creams may be prescribed.
• Use acetaminophen or ibuprofen to relieve minor pain.

ACTIVITY

• Avoid sexual intercourse during treatment.
• Resume your normal activities when the infection is cured.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of balanitis.
• Symptoms don’t improve in 3 days, despite treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

BALANITIS (Balanitis) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Balanitis es una inflamación del glande (cabeza) del pene y algunas veces también del prepucio. Es una condición común en los hombres. Ocurre con mayor frecuencia en los hombres que tienen prepucio (que no han sido circuncidados).

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Sensibilidad, enrojecimiento, comezón e hinchazón de la cabeza del pene.
• Inflamación del prepucio.
• Incapacidad de retraer el prepucio (fimosis).
• Impotencia.
• Supuración por el pene.
• Ardor al orinar (rara vez).

CAUSAS
La inflamación es una reacción a una infección (la causa más común), lesión o irritación del pene. Algunas veces se desconoce la causa.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Diabetes.
• Mala higiene.
• Alergia a productos químicos en la ropa, cremas anticonceptivas o condones de látex.
• Reacción a ciertos medicamentos.
• Trauma o lesión leve en el prepucio y en el pene.
• Prepucio intacto.
• Compañera sexual que sufre de vaginitis (rara vez).
• Ser muy obeso.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Lavarse diariamente con agua y jabón y después de las relaciones sexuales. Limpiarse debajo del prepucio cuidadosamente.
• Controlar la diabetes u otras condiciones médicas.
• Pérdida de peso en los varones obesos.
• El uso de condones de látex durante las relaciones sexuales puede ayudar a prevenir algunas infecciones.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Generalmente curable en 1 o 2 semanas con tratamiento.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• La inflamación crónica puede causar:
– Cicatrices o estrechamiento de la abertura del pene (estenosis de la uretra).
– Fimosis (incapacidad de retraer el prepucio).
– Parafimosis (incapacidad de cubrir la cabeza del pene con el prepucio).
– Infección del tracto urinario.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica generalmente puede diagnosticar el trastorno examinando el pene. Puede hacerse un cultivo de la secreción del pene. y exámenes para otros trastornos médicos (tales como la diabetes). Si la balanitis persiste, se le puede hacer una biopsia (se extrae una muestra de tejido para examinarla) para descartar el cáncer.
• Generalmente el tratamiento incluye medicamentos para aplicarlos en el pene y tener una buena higiene.
• Remojos con agua tibia para aliviar el dolor y la molestia.
• Un prepucio que no puede retraerse puede tratarse con esteroides tópicos, técnicas de estiramiento (hechas durante 2 a 3 semanas) o con un corte especial hecho en el prepucio.
• Pueden recomendarle cirugía para la circuncisión del pene si la balanitis se repite con frecuencia o aparecen cicatrices.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Generalmente se recetan antibióticos para aplicarse en el pene. Rara vez se pueden recetar antibióticos orales.
• Se pueden recetar cremas esteroides para la piel.
• Use paracetamol o ibuprofeno para aliviar dolores leves.

ACTIVIDAD

• Evite las relaciones sexuales durante el tratamiento.
• Reanude las actividades normales una vez curada la infección.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de balanitis.
• Los síntomas no mejoran en 3 días, a pesar del tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BALDNESS, PATTERN (Androgenetic Alopecia)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Pattern baldness is the gradual, painless hair loss that occurs in a certain pattern as a person ages. The medical term is androgenetic alopecia. The earlier the hair loss begins, the greater the eventual loss. Some persons have short periods of intense hair loss followed by long, stable periods. In men, hair loss appears as early as the teens; in women, it rarely appears before their 50’s.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• In men, hair thins on top of the head and recedes in the temple and front areas.
• In women, hair tends to thin on top of the head.
• Both sexes may have scattered hair loss.

CAUSES
It is probably due to a combination of hormonal and genetic factors. Male hormones (most often, androgens) are an important factor in balding. Estrogen (a female hormone) may be protective in women, because hair loss rarely begins before menopause. Hair loss that occurs after illness, pregnancy, or as an adverse reaction to drugs is a different form of baldness. Normal everyday stress is not a cause of pattern baldness.

RISK INCREASES WITH
Family history of pattern baldness.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Some drug therapies have been shown to slow or reverse baldness to some degree in some men. Other medical treatments are undergoing study.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• There is no cure. Balding can range from partial loss to complete baldness.
• In most cases, men let the process run its course. Use of a hairpiece or hair transplant is acceptable to some. Drug therapy may help others.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• There are no medical complications.
• Baldness can cause emotional distress, such as anxiety and a negative effect on self-image.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• There is usually no need for medical care. If you do have concerns about the hair loss, see your health care provider. If it is not a typical hair loss, medical tests may be done to see if there is another cause.
• If you are not comfortable with the hair loss, there are options that you can consider.
– Wear a hairpiece (toupee or a wig) or get a hair weave (synthetic hair is sewn into existing hair). Be sure to use care in keeping your scalp clean under the hairpiece.
– Have a hair-transplantation procedure or scalp-reduction surgery. Be sure to seek information about the risks and benefits before undergoing these procedures.
– Use drug therapy.
• Be cautious about buying and using hair products that claim to thicken or strengthen hair. They often use oils or waxes to give an effect of thickening.

MEDICATIONS

• A nonprescription topical drug, minoxidil, seems to help hair growth in some patients. Its effectiveness varies greatly. If it helps you, you need to continue its use indefinitely to sustain hair growth.
• Finasteride is a drug taken by mouth that can be prescribed for hair loss in men. It is not approved for use in women as it may cause birth defects.

ACTIVITY
No limits.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF
You or a family member has concerns about hair loss.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ALOPECIA (Calvicie, Alopecia Androgenética) (Baldness, Pattern [Androgenetic Alopecia]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Pérdida gradual e indolora del cabello que ocurre en ciertos patrones a medida que una persona envejece. El término médico es alopecia androgenética. Mientras más temprano la pérdida de cabello comience, mayor será la pérdida final. Algunas personas sufren de periodos cortos de pérdida abundante de cabello, seguida por periodos largos y estables. En los hombres, la pérdida del cabello aparece tan temprano como en la adolescencia; en las mujeres, rara vez aparece antes de los 50 años.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• En los hombres, el cabello se hace ralo en la coronilla y retrocede en las sienes y la frente.
• En las mujeres, el cabello se hace ralo en la coronilla.
• Ambos sexos pueden tener pérdida de cabello difusa.

CAUSAS
Probablemente se debe a una combinación de factores hormonales y genéticos. Las hormonas masculinas (frecuentemente, los andrógenos) son un factor importante en la calvicie. El estrógeno (una hormona femenina) puede proteger a las mujeres, porque la pérdida del cabello rara vez comienza antes de la menopausia. La pérdida de cabello que ocurre después de una enfermedad, embarazo o como una reacción adversa a medicamentos resulta en una forma diferente de calvicie. El estrés diario normal no es una causa del patrón de calvicie.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON
Antecedentes familiares de patrones de calvicie.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
Se ha demostrado que algunas terapias con medicamentos pueden disminuir o revertir la calvicie en algún grado en algunos hombres. Otros tratamientos médicos están siendo estudiados.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• No hay cura. La calvicie puede variar de pérdida parcial a calvicie completa.
• En la mayoría de los casos, los hombres dejan que el proceso continúe su curso. Para algunos, el uso de una peluca o el trasplante de cabello es aceptable. La terapia con medicamentos puede ayudar a otros.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• No hay complicaciones médicas.
• La calvicie puede causar estrés emocional, tales como ansiedad y un efecto negativo en la autoimagen.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Generalmente no hay necesidad de cuidado médico. Si tiene preocupaciones acerca de la pérdida del cabello, vea al proveedor de atención médica. Si no es una pérdida del cabello típica, se pueden hacer exámenes médicos para ver si hay otra causa.
• Si no está cómodo con la pérdida del cabello, hay opciones que puede considerar
– Use un postizo (tupé o peluca) o hágase extensiones en el cabello (cabello sintético que es cosido al pelo existente). Asegúrese de mantener su cuero cabelludo limpio debajo del postizo.
– Tenga un procedimiento de trasplante de cabello o una cirugía de reducción de cuero cabelludo. Asegúrese de obtener información acerca de los riesgos y beneficios antes de someterse al procedimiento.
– Use terapia con medicamentos.
• Sea cauteloso acerca de comprar y usar productos para el cabello que dicen engrosar o fortalecer el cabello. A menudo usan aceites o ceras que dan el efecto de engrosar el cabello.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Un medicamento tópico de venta sin receta, minoxidil, aparentemente ayuda al crecimiento del cabello en algunos pacientes. Su efectividad varía grandemente. Si le ayuda, necesita continuar usándolo indefinidamente para mantener el crecimiento del cabello.
• Finasteroide es un medicamento ingerido oralmente que puede ser recetado para la pérdida de cabello en los hombres. No está aprobado para usarse en las mujeres ya que puede causar defectos de nacimiento.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin límites.

DIETA
Ninguna dieta especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI
Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene preocupaciones acerca de la pérdida del cabello.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BAROTITIS MEDIA (Barotrauma)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Barotitis media is damage to the middle ear caused by pressure changes. It affects the middle ear and the eustachian tube (a tube from the ear to the back of the nose and throat).

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Hearing loss (to varying degrees).
• A plugged feeling in the ear.
• Mild to severe pain in the ears, or over the cheekbones and forehead.
• Dizziness.
• Ringing noises in the ear.
• Crying in infants or young children.

CAUSES

• Damage caused by sudden, increased pressure in the air around you. This occurs in the rapid descent of an airplane or while scuba diving. In these activities, air moves from passages in the nose into the middle ear to maintain equal pressure on both sides of the eardrum. If the tube leading from the nose to the ear doesn’t function properly, pressure in the middle ear is less than the outside pressure. The negative pressure in the middle ear sucks the eardrum inward. Blood and mucus may appear later in the middle ear. This damage is more likely if you have a nose or throat infection when scuba diving or traveling by air.
• Injury to external or middle ear (boxing, water skiing, accidents, etc.).

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Recent lung, nose, or throat infection.
• Airplane flight.
• Scuba diving.
• Sky diving.
• High-altitude mountain climbers.
• High-impact sports.
• Pregnancy.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• If possible, don’t fly when you have a lung, nose, or throat infection. If you must fly anyway, use nonprescription decongestant tablets or sprays. Follow the package instructions.
• During air travel:
– While taking off or landing, suck on hard candy or chew gum to cause frequent swallowing.
– Take a moderate-size breath and hold your nose. Try to force air into the eustachian tube by gently puffing out the cheeks with the mouth closed. This is called the Valsalva maneuver.
– Give an infant a bottle of water or juice while taking off or landing during airplane travel.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Most cases of barotitis media heal with self-care.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Permanent hearing loss.
• Ruptured eardrum.
• Middle ear infection.
• Tinnitus (hearing noises in the ear) or vertigo.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• In most cases, no treatment is necessary and the symptoms disappear in hours or days.
• If fluid drains from the ear, place a small piece of cotton in the outer-ear canal to absorb it.
• See your health care provider if symptoms continue. An ear exam usually confirms the diagnosis.
• Rarely, surgery may be required to open the eardrum and release fluid trapped in the middle ear. A plastic tube may be placed in the eardrum to keep it open. The tube falls out on its own in 9 to 12 months.

MEDICATIONS

• For minor pain, you may use nonprescription decongestants and pain relievers, such as acetaminophen.
• Your health care provider may prescribe other oral or nasal decongestants or oral antihistamine and anti-inflammatory drugs.
• Antibiotics may be prescribed if infection is present.

ACTIVITY
Resume your normal activities as soon as symptoms improve.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of barotitis media.
• The following occur during treatment: severe headache or other pain, fever, and dizziness.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

BAROTITIS MEDIA (Barotitis Media [Barotrauma]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Barotitis media es daño al oído medio causado por los cambios en presión. Afecta al oído medio y la trompa de Eustaquio (un tubo que va desde el oído hasta la parte trasera de la nariz y la garganta).

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Pérdida de audición (en diversos grados).
• Una sensación de taponamiento en el oído.
• Dolor que va de moderado a severo en los oídos o sobre los pómulos y la frente.
• Mareo.
• Tintineo en los oídos.
• Llanto en infantes o niños pequeños.

CAUSAS

• Daño causado por un aumento súbito de la presión del aire circundante. Esto ocurre durante el descenso rápido de un avión o al practicar buceo. Durante estas actividades el aire se mueve de los pasajes nasales al oído medio para equilibrar la presión a ambos lados del tímpano. Si el tubo que va de la nariz al oído no funciona apropiadamente, la presión en el oído medio es menor que la presión exterior. La presión negativa en el oído medio succiona el tímpano hacia adentro. Es posible que más tarde aparezcan sangre y mucosidad en el oído medio. Este daño es más probable cuando existe una infección en la nariz o de garganta al practicar buceo o al viajar por aire.
• Trauma en el oído externo o en el oído medio (causado por boxeo, esquí acuático, accidentes, etc.).

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Infección reciente del pulmón, nariz o garganta.
• Viajar en avión.
• Buceo.
• Paracaidismo, caída libre.
• Escalar montañas a gran altura.
• Deportes de alto impacto.
• Embarazo.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Si es posible, no viaje en avión cuando tiene infección del pulmón, nariz o garganta. Si tiene que viajar de cualquier manera, use un descongestionante de venta sin receta en tabletas o aerosoles. Siga las instrucciones del paquete.
• Durante el viaje aéreo:
– Durante el despegue o el aterrizaje, chupe caramelos duros o mastique chicle para poder tragar seguido.
– Aspire un poco de aire y apriétese la nariz. Trate de forzar el aire hacia dentro de la trompa de Eustaquio inflando las mejillas suavemente con la boca cerrada. Esto se llama la maniobra de Valsalva.
– Dele a un infante un biberón de agua o de jugo durante el despegue o aterrizaje.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
La mayoría de los casos de barotitis media se curan con autocuidado.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Pérdida permanente de la audición.
• Ruptura del tímpano.
• Infección del oído medio.
• Acúfenos (zumbidos en el oído) o vértigo.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• En la mayoría de los casos, no se necesita tratamiento y los síntomas desaparecen en horas o días.
• Si el oído drena líquido, póngase un pedazo pequeño de algodón en el canal exterior del oído para absorberlo.
• Vea a su proveedor de atención médica si los síntomas continúan. Un examen del oído generalmente puede confirmar el diagnóstico.
• En raras ocasiones, se puede requerir cirugía para abrir el tímpano y dejar salir el líquido atrapado en el oído medio. Se puede insertar un tubo plástico en el tímpano para mantenerlo abierto. El tubo se desprende por sí mismo en 9 a 12 meses.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Para malestares leves puede usar descongestionantes de venta sin receta y analgésicos, tales como el paracetamol.
• Su proveedor de atención médica puede recetar otros descongestionantes orales o nasales, o medicamentos antihistamínicos y antiinflamatorios.
• Antibióticos pueden ser recetados, si hay infección.

ACTIVIDAD
Reanude las actividades normales tan pronto como mejoren los síntomas.

DIETA
Ninguna dieta especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de barotitis media.
• Durante el tratamiento ocurre lo siguiente: dolor de cabeza severo u otro dolor severo, fiebre y mareo.
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BED-WETTING (Enuresis)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Bed-wetting (enuresis) is the repeated urination during sleep by a child who is old enough (usually by age 5) to have urinary control. Some children have been wetting the bed all along. This is called primary nocturnal enuresis. Some children start bed-wetting after having been dry at night for at least 6 months. This is called secondary nocturnal enuresis. Most children who wet the bed are healthy. Bed-wetting is a common problem and occurs more in boys than in girls.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
Repeated bed-wetting at night (occasionally during the day). This is not usually a concern until a child is older than 5.

CAUSES
Genetic factors (e,g, inherited) are involved. Delays in maturing, deep sleep, small bladder capacity, polyuria (excess urine), stress, or trauma may play a role. In a few children, a medical illness or other health problem may be the cause.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Family history of bed-wetting.
• Illness such as diabetes or urinary-tract infection.
• Stress or trauma in a child (e.g., parents divorce, new sibling, moving to new home, abuse, hospital care, and others).

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• No effective preventive methods are known.
• Show your child love, support, and understanding for this problem.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
If there are no medical or emotional problems, children normally outgrow the bed-wetting problem. Treatment measures are successful in many cases.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Child feels anxious, embarrassed, and shameful. May lead to social withdrawal, loss of self-esteem, or other problems. Parents become frustrated.
• Urinary-tract infection.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Talk to your child’s health care provider about the bed-wetting problem. A physical exam will be done and questions asked about the symptoms and your child’s lifestyle. Medical tests are sometimes done to rule out diabetes or other medical problems as causes. These can include urine studies or imaging tests.
• Follow any medical care advice from your child’s health care provider.
• Protect the mattress with a heavy plastic cover.
• Stop using diapers or plastic pants by age 4. They may make it easy for the child to keep on wetting.
• Have the child change the sheet on the bed and do the laundry, if he or she is old enough.
• Have a nightlight so the child can find the bathroom.
• Don’t give any liquids to the child for 2 to 3 hours prior to bedtime.
• Have the child urinate at bedtime. You can also wake the child at night to urinate, but this is hard on parents.
• Reward the child for staying dry with praise and hugs. Use gold stars or happy faces to mark dry nights on a calendar.
• Try alarms that are triggered by wetting. These may be used in undergarments, pajamas, or mattresses. They have a high success rate.
• Counseling may be recommended for the child and the family if there are emotional or stress problems.
• Respond gently to accidents. Don’t blame, nag, restrict, or punish the child who has wet the bed. This can cause him to give up or lead to other problems. Your child’s bed-wetting should resolve with time.

MEDICATIONS

• The drug vasopressin may be prescribed if other methods fail and the family favors drug therapy.
• Certain other drugs may be recommended for some.

ACTIVITY
No limits.

DIET
Avoid any beverages that contain caffeine (e.g., colas). Encourage your child to drink moderately during the day. Limit or discontinue any fluid intake during the 2 to 3 hours before bedtime.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You are concerned about your child’s bed-wetting and your child is older than 5.
• The child dribbles urine, has a weak urinary stream, feels pain when urinating, or must strain to urinate.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ORINARSE EN LA CAMA (Enuresis) (Bed-wetting [Enuresis]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Orinarse en la cama es la micción repetida durante el sueño por un niño de edad suficiente (por lo general los 5 años) para tener control urinario. Algunos niños se han estado orinando en la cama todo el tiempo. Esto se llama enuresis nocturna primaria Algunos niños empiezan a orinarse en la cama después de haber estado secos por la noche por al menos 6 meses. Esto se llama enuresis nocturna secundaria. La mayoría de los niños que se orinan en la cama son sanos. Orinarse en la cama es un problema muy común y les ocurre más a los varones que a las niñas.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES
Orinarse en la cama de noche repetidamente (ocasionalmente durante el día). Esto no suele ser una preocupación hasta que el niño es mayor de 5 años.

CAUSAS
Factores genéticos (i.e., heredados) están involucrados. Retardo en la maduración, sueño profundo, poca capacidad de la vejiga, poliuria (exceso de orina), estrés o trauma pueden jugar un papel. En unos pocos niños, una enfermedad médica u otros problemas de salud pueden ser la causa.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Antecedentes familiares de orinarse en la cama.
• Enfermedades como la diabetes o infección del tracto urinario.
• Estrés o trauma en el niño (p. ej., divorcio de los padres, un hermano nuevo, mudarse de casa, el abuso, estadía en el hospital y otros).

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• No se conocen métodos eficaces de prevención.
• Demuéstrele a su hijo cariño, apoyo y comprensión con respecto a este problema.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Si no hay problemas médicos o emocionales, los niños suelen superar el problema de orinarse en la cama. Los tratamientos en muchos casos tienen éxito.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• El niño se siente ansioso, abochornado y avergonzado. Puede conducir al aislamiento social, pérdida de la propia-estima u otros problemas. Los padres se sienten frustrados.
• Infección del tracto urinario.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Hable con el proveedor de salud de su hijo sobre el problema de orinarse en la cama. Se le hará un examen físico y se le harán preguntas sobre los síntomas y el estilo de vida de su hijo. A veces se realizan pruebas médicas para descartar a la diabetes u otros problemas médicos como causas. Estos pueden incluir estudios de la orina o pruebas de imágenes.
• Siga los consejos del proveedor de salud de su hijo.
• Proteja el colchón con una cubierta pesada de plástico.
• Deje de usar pañales o calzones de plástico para los 4 años. Eso le hace más fácil al niño seguir orinándose.
• Haga que el niño cambie las sábanas de la cama y las lave, si él o ella tiene la edad suficiente.
• Ponga una lamparilla de luz nocturna para que el niño pueda encontrar el baño.
• No le de líquidos al niño por 2 a 3 horas antes de irse a dormir.
• Hágale orinar antes de irse a dormir. También le puede despertar durante la noche para orinar, pero eso es oneroso para los padres.
• Recompense al niño con elogios y abrazos por permanecer seco. Use estrellas doradas o caras felices para marcar las noches secas en un calendario.
• Pruebe usar un despertador que se activa cuando el niño se orina. Estos se pueden usar en la ropa interior, pijamas o colchones. Tienen un nivel alto de éxito.
• Se le puede recomendar terapia para el niño y la familia si hay problemas emocionales y de estrés.
• Responda con calma a los accidentes. No culpe, regañe, restrinja o castigue al niño que se ha orinado en la cama. Eso le puede hacer darse por vencido o conducir a otros problemas. El orinarse en la cama de su hijo debe resolverse con el tiempo.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se le puede prescribir el medicamento vasopresina si otros métodos fallan y la familia favorece la terapia de medicamentos.
• A algunos se les puede recomendar ciertos otros medicamentos.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin límites.

DIETA
Evite bebidas con cafeína (p. ej., colas). Anímele a su hijo a beber moderadamente durante el día. Limite o suspenda los fluidos durante 2 a 3 horas antes de la hora de irse a la cama.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Está preocupado debido a que su hijo se orina en la cama y su hijo es mayor de 5 años.
• El niño orina a gotas, tiene un chorrito débil, siente dolor al orinar, o debe hacer un esfuerzo para orinar.
• Aparecen síntomas nuevos inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BELL’S PALSY

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Bell’s palsy is a paralysis or weakness on one side of the face. The onset may be sudden, or may come on over several days. Bell’s palsy involves a cranial nerve and the facial muscles that connect to the nerve. It most often affects people over the age of 13 and occurs more frequently in young adults.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Sudden paralysis on one side of the face, including muscles to the eyelid.
• Pain in or around the ear on the affected side.
• Numbness on the side of the face.
• Flat, expressionless features on one side of the face.
• Distorted smiles and frowns; drooling.
• Changes in taste, saliva, or tear formation.

CAUSES
Unknown. The paralysis is probably caused by swelling of the facial nerve. The swelling may be caused by a viral infection of the facial nerve as it passes through the temporal bone of the skull.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Common cold, flu, other upper respiratory infection.
• Pregnancy.
• Diabetes.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Cannot be prevented at present.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• The amount of paralysis determines the extent of recovery. Most patients recover completely with or without treatment.
• Recovery usually begins in 3 weeks and is gradual. Recovery time varies and may take 3 to 6 months.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Eye irritation or injury, because the eye does not close properly and is exposed to dust. If unprotected, the eye may develop ulcers on the cornea.
• Incomplete recovery from paralysis. Results may be slight, mild, or severe.
• Emotional and self-esteem problems.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam of the affected area. Medical tests such as x-ray may be done to rule out other causes. A nerve study of the facial nerves may be done to determine the extent of nerve damage.
• If you have pain, apply heat to the area twice a day. Use a moist, warm towel and apply for 15 minutes. Cover or close the eye during heat treatments.
• If you cannot wink or close your eye well, you should buy a pair of wrap-around, plastic sports goggles. Wear them to protect your eye from dirt, dust, and dryness.
• At night, apply an eye patch to shut the lid so that the eye stays moist and protected. Sometimes, a patch will be necessary during the daytime.
• As muscle strength returns, use facial massage and exercises. Massage muscles of the forehead, cheek, lips and eyes using cream or oil. Exercise the weak muscles in front of a mirror. Open and close the eye; wink, smile, and bare your teeth. Perform the massage and exercises for 15 to 20 minutes several times a day.
• Brush and floss teeth regularly.
• Surgery on the facial nerve may (rarely) be needed.

MEDICATIONS

• You may be prescribed eye drops for comfort and protection of the exposed eye.
• Antiviral drugs may be prescribed.
• Cortisone drugs may be prescribed to reduce swelling and inflammation of the affected nerve.

ACTIVITY
Maintain your normal activities.

DIET
A soft diet is often necessary.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of Bell’s palsy.
• Eye becomes red or irritated, despite treatment.
• Drooling or pain worsens or fever occurs.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

PARALISIS DE BELL (Bell’s Palsy) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La parálisis de Bell es la parálisis o debilidad de un lado de la cara. Puede aparecer súbitamente o demorarse varios días. La parálisis de Bell afecta un nervio craneal y los músculos faciales conectados al nervio. Afecta con más frecuencia a las personas mayores de 13 años y ocurre con más frecuencia en adultos jóvenes.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Parálisis súbita de un lado de la cara, incluyendo los músculos del párpado.
• Dolor en o alrededor de la oreja del lado afectado.
• Adormecimiento en el lado de la cara.
• Un lado de la cara queda liso y sin expresión.
• Sonrisas y ceños fruncidos distorsionados; babear.
• Cambios en el gusto, la salivación y el lagrimeo.

CAUSAS
Desconocidas. La parálisis es probablemente causada por una hinchazón del nervio facial. Esta hinchazón puede ser causada por una infección viral del nervio facial al pasar por el hueso temporal del cráneo.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Resfriado, gripe, otra infección respiratoria superior.
• Embarazo.
• Diabetes.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
Actualmente no puede prevenirse.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• El grado de recuperación depende de la magnitud de la parálisis. La mayoría de los pacientes se recuperan completamente con o sin tratamiento.
• La recuperación generalmente comienza en 3 semanas y es gradual. El tiempo de recuperación varía, y puede llevar de 3 a 6 meses.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Irritación o lesiones en el ojo, debido a que no puede cerrarse completamente y está expuesto al polvo. Si se deja sin protección, el ojo puede desarrollar úlceras en la córnea.
• Recuperación incompleta de la parálisis. Los resultados pueden ser leves, moderados o graves.
• Problemas psicológicos y de autoestima.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico del área afectada. Exámenes médicos como radiografías pueden ser hechos para descartar otras causas. Un estudio del nervio facial puede ser hecho para determinar la extensión del daño al nervio.
• Si tiene dolor, aplíquese calor al área dos veces al día. Use una toalla húmeda con agua tibia y aplíquela por 15 minutos. Cubra o cierre el ojo durante los tratamientos con calor.
• Si no puede parpadear o cerrar bien el ojo, adquiera un par de gafas protectoras tipo burbuja de plástico. Úselas para proteger el ojo contra la suciedad, el polvo y la resequedad.
• Por la noche póngase un parche en el ojo para cerrar el párpado de modo que el ojo permanezca húmedo y protegido. En ocasiones, será necesario usar el parche durante el día.
• A medida que regrese la fuerza muscular, use masajes y ejercicios faciales. Hágase masajes en los músculos de la frente, mejillas, labios y ojos usando crema o aceite. Ejercite los músculos débiles frente al espejo. Abra y cierre el ojo, parpadee, sonría y muestre los dientes. Los masajes y ejercicios deben hacerse de 15 a 20 minutos varias veces al día.
• Cepíllese los dientes y límpielos con hilo dental regularmente.
• Puede ser necesaria cirugía del nervio facial (rara vez).

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se le puede recetar gotas para ojos para alivio y protección del ojo expuesto.
• Se le pueden prescribir medicamentos antivirales.
• Se le pueden prescribir medicamentos de cortisona para reducir la hinchazón e inflamación del nervio afectado.

ACTIVIDAD
Mantenga las actividades normales.

DIETA
A menudo es necesaria una dieta blanda.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de la parálisis Bell.
• A pesar del tratamiento el ojo se enrojece o irrita.
• Aumenta el babeo o el dolor, o le sube la fiebre.
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BENIGN PAROXYSMAL POSITIONAL VERTIGO (BPPV)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common, inner ear disorder that causes dizziness or vertigo with certain movements of the head.
• Benign means “not very serious.”
• Paroxysmal means “sudden and variable in onset.”
• Positional, because it comes about with a change in head position.
• Vertigo, causing a sense of the room spinning or whirling.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• A sensation of dizziness or vertigo (spinning). Vertigo begins 5 to 10 seconds after the head moves and lasts less than a minute. Feeling off balance may last longer.
• Most often, only one ear is affected, so symptoms occur when the head is turned that way. Symptoms are brought on when getting out of bed, rolling over in bed, or when looking up for an object on a high shelf.
• Falling, or a feeling of falling.
• Feeling lightheaded or woozy.
• Visual blurring.
• Nausea and vomiting (sometimes).
• Faintness, changes in heart rate and blood pressure, fear, anxiety, or (less often) panic.
• It does not cause hearing loss or ear noises (tinnitus).

CAUSES
It is thought to be caused by small crystals of calcium carbonate (also called “ear rocks,” otoconia or otoliths) in the inner ear. The crystals normally help tell the brain about your head position. Sometimes the crystals become dislodged from their location in the vestibule and move into a semicircular canal. This can disrupt the ear’s balance centers and cause the symptoms.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Head injury.
• Degeneration of the vestibular system of the inner ear (usually in older people).
• Ear infection or disorder.
• Surgery.
• Central nervous system disease.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
No specific preventive measures.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
The condition usually clears up on its own within several weeks. It may recur. Treatment can hasten healing.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
BPPV symptoms may come and go, recur after treatment, or become chronic.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do an exam of the ears and ask questions about your symptoms and activities. When BPPV occurs, there is an involuntary movement of the eyes, which is called nystagmus. To make the diagnosis, the patient’s head is put into certain positions and the eye movements are observed. Medical tests may be done to confirm the diagnosis.
• Treatment may involve watchful waiting. No treatment is done at first to see if the problem resolves itself.
• An office procedure (e.g., Epley maneuver) may be done for treatment. It is performed by placing a patient’s head in various positions. This will cause the crystals to loosen and return to normal movement. This procedure takes about 5 to 10 minutes. Frequently, only one office procedure is needed. It is painless and has few side effects if any. There may be mild vertigo for a few days afterwards.
• Self-treatment exercises may be recommended. These can be done if symptoms recur, or office procedure was not effective. Instructions will be given on proper techniques for the head maneuvers. They are then done at home several times a day, usually for 2 weeks.
• Rarely, when other treatment is not effective, patients with severe symptoms may require surgery.
• To learn more: Vestibular Disorders Association, PO Box 4467, Portland, OR 97208-4467; (800) 837-8428; website: www.vestibular.org .

MEDICATIONS
Usually not needed for this disorder. Drugs may be prescribed for specific symptoms, such as nausea.

ACTIVITY
Activities may be limited for 24 to 48 hours after the procedure is done. Specific instructions will be given.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.
• Symptoms recur after treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

VERTIGO POSICIONAL PAROXISTICO BENIGNO (VPPB) (Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo [BPPV]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
El vértigo posicional paroxístico benigno (VPPB) es un trastorno común del oído interno que causa mareos o vértigo con ciertos movimientos de la cabeza.
• Benigno significa que no es muy serio.
• Paroxístico significa que ocurre de repente y su comienzo varía.
• Posicional, porque ocurre de acuerdo a cambios en la posición de la cabeza.
• El vértigo causa la sensación del cuarto dando vueltas o de la cabeza dando vueltas.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Una sensación de mareos o vértigo (dar vueltas). El vértigo comienza entre 5 y 10 segundos después de mover la cabeza y dura menos de un minuto. La sensación de estar desbalanceado puede durar más tiempo.
• Por lo general, sólo un oído es afectado, por lo que los síntomas ocurren cuando la cabeza se mueve en esa dirección. Los síntomas aparecen al levantarse de la cama, al rodar sobre la cama o cuando está buscando un objeto en un estante alto.
• Caerse o sensación de caerse.
• Sensación de mareo o atontado.
• Visión borrosa.
• Náusea y vómitos (a veces).
• Desfallecimiento, cambios en el ritmo cardíaco y la presión sanguínea, miedo, ansiedad o (menos frecuente) pánico.
• No causa pérdida de audición o zumbidos en los oídos (acúfenos).

CAUSAS
Se cree que es causado por cristales pequeños de carbonato de calcio (también conocidos como rocas del oído, otoconia u otolitos) en el oído interno. Los cristales normalmente le avisan al cerebro sobre la posición de su cabeza. A veces los cristales se desprenden de su ubicación en el utrículo y se desparraman a un canal semicircular. Esto puede perturbar los centros de equilibrio del oído y causar los síntomas.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Lesión a la cabeza.
• Degeneración del sistema utricular del oído interno (generalmente en personas mayores).
• Infección o trastorno del oído.
• Cirugía.
• Enfermedad del sistema nervioso central.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No existen medidas preventivas específicas.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
La condición generalmente desaparece por su cuenta dentro de algunas semanas. Puede reaparecer. El tratamiento puede acelerar la recuperación.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Los síntomas de VPPB pueden aparecer y desaparecer, recurrir después del tratamiento o convertirse en crónicos.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen de los oídos y le preguntará sobre sus síntomas y actividades. Cuando el VPPB ocurre, existe un movimiento involuntario de los ojos el cual es llamado nistagmo. Para determinar el diagnóstico, la cabeza del paciente es colocada en ciertas posiciones para observar el movimiento de los ojos. Ciertos exámenes médicos pueden ser realizados para confirmar el diagnóstico.
• El tratamiento puede requerir estar en observación. No se realiza ningún tratamiento al principio para ver si el problema se resuelve por sí mismo.
• Un procedimiento ambulatorio (p. ej., la maniobra de Epley) puede ser realizado como tratamiento. Se realiza colocando la cabeza del paciente en varias posiciones. Esto causa que los cristales se despeguen y regresen a su movimiento normal. El procedimiento tarda entre 5 y 10 minutos. Frecuentemente, solo un procedimiento como éste es necesario. éste no produce dolor y tiene pocos efectos secundarios, o ninguno. Puede que experimente un vértigo leve por unos pocos días más.
• El tratamiento con ejercicios realizados por el mismo paciente puede ser recomendado. Estos pueden ser realizados si los síntomas recurren o el procedimiento ambulatorio no fue efectivo. Se le darán las instrucciones de las técnicas apropiadas para los movimientos de la cabeza. Estos son realizados en el hogar varias veces al día, generalmente por un período de 2 semanas.
• Rara vez, cuando otros tratamientos no son efectivos, el paciente con síntomas severos puede requerir cirugía.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: Vestibular Disorders Association, PO Box 4467, Portland, OR 97208-4467; (800) 837-8428; sitio web: www.vestibular.org .

MEDICAMENTOS
Por lo general, no se requieren medicamentos para este trastorno. Los medicamentos pueden ser recetados para síntomas específicos, tales como la náusea.

ACTIVIDAD
Las actividades pueden ser limitadas durante las primeras 24 a 48 horas después de realizar el procedimiento. Se le darán instrucciones específicas.

DIETA
Ninguna dieta en especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia experimenta los síntomas de vértigo posicional paroxístico benigno.
• Los síntomas recurren después del tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BIPOLAR DISORDER (Manic-Depressive Disorder)

BASIC INFORMATION
Bipolar disorder is a condition in which a person has episodes of mania (being excited and high) and of depression (being sad and down). These episodes can alternate with periods of normal behavior. Episodes may last days, weeks, or months. Symptoms usually appear between ages 15 to 25, but the disorder can affect all ages. There are several types of bipolar disorder (ranging from mild to more severe).

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Mania:
– Higher than normal energy levels.
– Getting up earlier and earlier in the morning. Some people may not sleep at all for 3 to 4 days.
– Easily distracted and restless. Excited to start new projects, but then rarely finish.
– May go on spending sprees.
– May become sexually promiscuous.
– Often irritable. Often has attacks of rage.
– Speech becomes rapid. Speech may not make sense.
– May have very high opinion of one’s abilities.
– May forget to eat. May lose weight. Can become exhausted.
– May have delusions of grandeur.
• Depression:
– Becomes more and more withdrawn. Sleep may be disturbed. Late rising becomes a habit.
– May stay in one’s room. May be afraid to face the world. Often lacks self-esteem.
– Self-neglect.
– Sex drive is lowered.
– Slow speech and movement.
– Imagined problems multiply.
– Worries about imagined illnesses.

CAUSES
There is no single cause. Genetics plays a part. Other factors may include changes in chemicals in the brain and environmental factors, such as stress.

RISK INCREASES WITH
Family history of bipolar disorder.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
There are no known preventive measures.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Long-term therapy can help reduce how often and how severe the episodes are.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Relapse, especially if drug therapy is stopped.
• Problems at work, school, or home.
• Failure to get better.
• Alcohol or drug abuse.
• Suicide.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will usually do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms and activities. Psychological testing may be done. Other medical tests are usually done to rule out infections or disorders that could be causing the symptoms.
• Treatment will depend on the specific symptoms. Follow your health care provider’s instructions. Schedule regular office visits. Your health care provider will monitor the effectiveness of the treatment and watch for side effects.
• Hospital care may be required for severe symptoms. A stay at a mental health facility may be recommended.
• Do not stop taking your medicine when you feel better. This may cause a relapse.
• Education and counseling can help you, and your family, cope with the condition. Family members should learn to recognize signs of a coming episode.
• Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) may be considered if other treatment steps are not successful.
• Seek support groups. Contact social agencies for help. Call a suicide prevention hotline if needed.
• To learn more: Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance, 730 N. Franklin St., Suite 501, Chicago, IL 60610; (800) 826-3632; website: www.dbsalliance.org .

MEDICATION
Drugs will be prescribed to help relieve symptoms of the depression and the manic episodes. Other drugs may be prescribed to help prevent mood swings. Changes in drugs or dosages may be needed at various times to manage the illness more effectively.

ACTIVITY
Maintain daily activities. Exercise on a regular basis.

DIET
Try to eat well even if you have little or no appetite.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has bipolar disorder symptoms.
• Any new symptoms develop that cause concern.
• You feel suicidal or hopeless. Call 911 if needed.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

TRASTORNO BIPOLAR (Trastorno Afectivo Bipolar) (Bipolar Disorder [Manic-Depressive Disorder]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
El trastorno bipolar es una condición en la cual una persona tiene episodios de manía (sentirse excitado y elevado) y depresión (sentirse triste y desalentado). Estos episodios pueden alternar con periodos de comportamiento normal. Los episodios pueden durar días, semanas o meses. Los síntomas generalmente aparecen entre los 15 y 25 años de edad, pero este trastorno puede afectar a todas las edades. El trastorno bipolar se da en varios grados (variando desde leve hasta más grave).

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Manía:
– Niveles de energía más elevados de lo normal.
– Se levanta cada vez más temprano en la mañana. Algunas personas no pueden dormir del todo por 3 a 4 días.
– Inquieto y fácilmente distraído. Se excita al comenzar nuevos proyectos, pero rara vez los termina.
– Puede salir a gastar dinero en forma imprudente.
– Puede convertirse en un promiscuo sexual.
– Frecuentemente está irritado y tiene ataques de furia.
– El habla es más rápida y puede no tener sentido.
– Puede tener una opinión excesivamente elevada de sus habilidades.
– Puede olvidarse de comer. Puede bajar de peso. Puede estar extenuado.
– Puede tener delirios de grandeza.
• Depresión:
– Se comporta en forma crecientemente retraída e introvertida. El sueño se perturba. Levantarse tarde se convierte en un hábito.
– Puede quedarse en una habitación. Puede tener miedo de enfrentar al mundo. Por lo general, no tiene autoestima.
– Se descuida a sí mismo.
– La libido disminuye.
– Los movimientos y el habla son lentos.
– Problemas imaginarios se multiplican.
– Se preocupa sobre enfermedades imaginarias.

CAUSAS
No hay una sola causa. La genética juega un rol. Otros factores pueden incluir cambios en las sustancias químicas en el cerebro y factores ambientales, tales como el estrés.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON
Antecedentes familiares de trastorno bipolar.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No existen medidas preventivas conocidas.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
La terapia a largo plazo puede ayudar a reducir la frecuencia e intensidad de los episodios.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Recaída, especialmente si no se toma el medicamento.
• Problemas en el trabajo, en la escuela o en el hogar.
• No poder mejorarse.
• Abuso de alcohol o drogas.
• Suicidio.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica generalmente le hará un examen físico y le preguntará sobre sus síntomas y actividades. Exámenes psicológicos pueden ser realizados. Otros exámenes médicos generalmente son realizados para eliminar la posibilidad de infecciones o trastornos que puedan causar los síntomas.
• El tratamiento dependerá de los síntomas específicos. Siga las instrucciones de su proveedor de atención médica. Programe visitas regulares al consultorio. Su médico observará la efectividad del tratamiento y verá si se desarrollan efectos secundarios.
• La hospitalización puede ser requerida en caso de síntomas severos. Una estadía en un centro de salud mental puede ser recomendada.
• No deje de tomar el medicamento aún cuando se sienta mejor. Esto puede causar una recaída.
• Aprender acerca de este trastorno y la asesoría psicológica pueden ayudarlo a usted y a su familia a sobrellevar la condición. Los miembros de la familia deben aprender a reconocer los signos de un episodio que se aproxima.
• El tratamiento por electroshock (ECT, por sus siglas en inglés) puede ser considerada si otros tratamientos no son exitosos.
• Busque grupos de apoyo. Contacte agencias sociales para ayuda. Llame a la línea de prevención de suicidio si es necesario.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance, 730 N. Franklin St., Suite 501, Chicago, IL 60610; (800) 826-3632; sitio web: www.dbsalliance.org .

MEDICAMENTOS
Se le pueden recetar algunos medicamentos para aliviar los síntomas de la depresión y de los episodios de manía. Otros medicamentos pueden ser recetados para ayudar a prevenir fluctuaciones de su estado de ánimo. Los cambios de medicamentos o de dosis pueden ser necesarios en varias ocasiones para controlar la enfermedad más efectivamente.

ACTIVIDAD
Mantenga las actividades diarias. Haga ejercicios con regularidad.

DIETA
Consuma una dieta normal y equilibrada. Trate de comer bien aunque tenga poco o ningún apetito.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia experimenta los síntomas del trastorno bipolar.
• Se desarrollan nuevos síntomas que le causan preocupación.
• Usted se siente suicida o sin esperanzas. Llame al 911 si es necesario.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BLADDER INFECTION, FEMALE (Cystitis in Women)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Bladder infection (cystitis) is a disorder of the urinary bladder (the organ that stores urine). Bladder infections are very common. Up to one-third of all females will have one at some point in their lives.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Pressure, burning, or stinging during urination.
• Frequent urination, although the amount of urine may be small; increased urge to urinate.
• Sensation of incomplete bladder emptying.
• Pain in the abdomen over the bladder or lower back.
• Blood in the urine; bad-smelling urine.
• Low fever and, possibly, chills.
• Painful sexual intercourse.
• Lack of urinary control (sometimes).
• A need to urinate more often at night.

CAUSES
The infection is caused by bacteria (germs) that enter the urinary tract system. A woman’s urethra opening (tube from bladder to outside) is short in length and close to the anus, which makes it easier for germs to travel from the bowel area. Germs inside the urethra can travel up into the bladder, causing infection and inflammation.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Sexual intercourse.
• Previous urinary tract infections.
• Pregnancy.
• Aging and associated conditions (e.g., menopause).
• Diabetes or other disorder affecting immune system.
• Certain types of birth control. These can include a diaphragm, spermicidal agent, or condom.
• Urinary tract problems (tumors, calculi, or strictures).
• Insertion of an instrument into the urinary tract (e.g., catheter or cystoscope).
• Poor hygiene or incomplete bladder emptying.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Urinate within 15 minutes after intercourse.
• Drink plenty of water every day.
• Get medical care for urinary tract infections.
• Don’t douche, use feminine hygiene sprays, or deodorants. Avoid bubble baths.
• Clean the anal area after bowel movements. Wipe from the front to the rear, rather than rear to front.
• Wear underwear that has a cotton crotch.
• Avoid postponing urination. Be sure to completely empty the bladder with urination.
• In women with frequent recurrence of infection, antibiotics may be prescribed for use before or after sexual intercourse or on a regular basis.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• Curable in a few days to 2 weeks with treatment.
• Recurrence is common.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
Inadequate treatment can lead to chronic bladder infections, kidney infection, and (rarely) kidney failure.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider may do a physical exam. Medical tests will include a urine test.
• Treatment is usually with antibiotic drugs.
• Warm baths may help relieve discomfort.
• Pour a cup of warm water over genital area while urinating. It will help to relieve burning and stinging.

MEDICATION

• Antibiotics for bacterial infection will be prescribed. Antibiotics may reduce the effectiveness of some birth control pills. If you are using birth control pills, discuss this with your health care provider.
• Urinary analgesics may be prescribed for pain. If phenazopyridine (Pyridium) is prescribed, it will turn the urine color to bright orange.

ACTIVITY
Avoid sexual intercourse until you have been free of symptoms for 2 weeks to allow inflammation to heal.

DIET

• Drink plenty of water daily to flush the bladder.
• Drink cranberry juice to acidify urine. Some antibiotic drugs have increased effectiveness when the urine is more acidic.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of bladder infection.
• Blood appears in the urine.
• Discomfort and other symptoms don’t improve after you have taken the antibiotics for 48 hours.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
• Symptoms recur after treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

INFECCION DE LA VEJIGA EN LA MUJER (Cistitis en La Mujer) (Bladder Infection, Female [Cystitis in Women]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La infección de la vejiga (cistitis) es un trastorno de la vejiga urinaria (el órgano que almacena la orina). Las infecciones de la vejiga son muy comunes. Hasta un tercio de todas las mujeres la van a experimentar en algún momento de sus vidas.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Presión, ardor o escozor al orinar.
• Orinar frecuentemente, aunque puede ser poca cantidad; deseos constantes de orinar.
• Sensación de que la vejiga no está completamente vacía.
• Dolor abdominal sobre la vejiga, o dolor en la zona baja de la espalda.
• Sangre en la orina; mal olor en la orina.
• Fiebre baja y posibles escalofríos.
• Dolor al tener relaciones sexuales.
• Pérdida del control urinario (a veces).
• Una necesidad de orinar con más frecuencia en las noches.

CAUSAS
La infección se debe a bacterias (microorganismos) que penetran en el sistema del tracto urinario. La abertura de la uretra de la mujer (un tubo desde la vejiga hasta el exterior) es corto y está cerca del ano, lo que hace más fácil que los gérmenes viajen desde el área del intestino. Los microorganismos dentro de la uretra pueden viajar hacia la vejiga, causando una infección e inflamación.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Relaciones sexuales.
• Previa infección del tracto urinario.
• Embarazo.
• Envejecimiento y condiciones asociadas (p. ej., la menopausia).
• La diabetes u otros trastornos que afectan al sistema inmunológico.
• Ciertos tipos de anticonceptivos. Estos incluyen el diafragma, agentes espermicidas y los condones.
• Problemas en el tracto urinario (tumores, cálculos o estenosis).
• Inserción de un instrumento en el tracto urinario (p. ej., catéter o cistoscopio).
• Mala higiene o no vaciar la vejiga completamente.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Orine antes de que pasen 15 minutos después de las relaciones sexuales.
• Tome agua en abundancia todos los días.
• Obtenga cuidado médico para las infecciones del tracto urinario.
• No use duchas vaginales ni se aplique rociados o desodorantes vaginales. Evite los baños con burbujas.
• Límpiese la zona alrededor del ano, después de toda evacuación intestinal. Límpiese de adelante hacia atrás, en vez de atrás hacia adelante.
• Use ropa interior que tenga entrepierna de algodón.
• Evite aguantar los deseos de orinar. Asegúrese de vaciar completamente la vejiga cuando orina.
• En las mujeres en que la infección recurre frecuentemente, pueden recetarse antibióticos para usarse antes o después de las relaciones sexuales o con regularidad.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• Con tratamiento, se cura en unos cuantos días o hasta 2 semanas.
• Es común que recurra.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Un tratamiento inadecuado puede causar infecciones crónicas de la vejiga, infección del riñón, y (raramente) fallo renal.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le puede hacer un examen físico. Los exámenes médicos incluirán un análisis de orina.
• Generalmente el tratamiento es con medicamentos antibióticos.
• Las molestias se pueden aliviar con baños tibios.
• Para aliviar el escozor y el ardor, derrame una taza de agua tibia sobre los genitales al orinar.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se recetarán antibióticos para combatir la infección bacteriana. Los antibióticos pueden reducir la efectividad de algunas pastillas anticonceptivas. Si está utilizando pastillas anticonceptivas, consulte esto con su proveedor de atención médica.
• Pueden recetarse analgésicos urinarios para el dolor. Si se receta fenazopiridina (Pyridium), la orina cambiará a un color naranja brillante.

ACTIVIDAD
Para que se le cure la inflamación, evite tener relaciones sexuales hasta que transcurran 2 semanas sin síntomas.

DIETA

• Tome agua en abundancia cada día para limpiar la vejiga.
• Tome jugo de arándanos agrios para acidificar la orina. Algunos medicamentos antibióticos son más efectivos cuando la orina está más ácida.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de infección de la vejiga.
• Aparece sangre en la orina.
• El malestar y los otros síntomas no mejoran después de haber tomado los antibióticos por 48 horas.
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
• Vuelven a aparecer los síntomas después del tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BLADDER INFECTION, MALE (Cystitis in Men)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Bladder infection (cystitis) is an infection of the urinary bladder (the organ that stores urine). It can occur at any age. After age 50, men are affected more often, due to prostate problems.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Burning and stinging when you urinate.
• Urinating more often. The amount of urine may be small.
• Feeling like you need to go even when your bladder is empty.
• Pain in the pubic area or low back pain.
• Discharge from the penis.
• Blood in the urine.
• Low-grade fever.
• Urine that smells bad.
• Not being able to control urination.

CAUSES
The most common cause is bacteria (or germs) from the skin near the rectum and genitals. The germs spread into the urethra (tube that goes from the bladder to the outside). The germs then travel to the bladder and cause irritation and inflammation. Prostate problems in older men add to the cause.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Blockage in the urinary tract. This may be due to kidney stones or tumor.
• Enlarged prostate gland.
• Poor hygiene.
• Lack of circumcision (foreskin can harbor bacteria).
• Aging and its associated conditions.
• Use of a catheter to empty the bladder.
• Failure to completely empty the bladder.
• Defects in the urinary tract.
• Anal intercourse or intercourse with infected woman.
• Diabetes or weak immune system.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Drink plenty of fluids daily.
• Use a latex condom during sex. This can help prevent the spread of any infection.
• Avoid the use of catheters, if possible.
• Urinate when you feel the urge, empty the bladder completely, and keep the genital area clean.
• Get medical care for any prostate infection.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• Usually curable with treatment.
• Complicated infections in males are sometimes more difficult to treat.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Recurrent or chronic bladder infections.
• Kidney infection.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will usually do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms. Medical tests include urine studies. Additional tests may be done to rule out other disorders.
• Treatment is usually with drugs, or sometimes surgery if a physical defect is the cause.
• Warm baths may provide relief from symptoms.
• To learn more: National Kidney Foundation, 30 E. 33rd St., Suite 1100, New York, NY 10016; (800) 622-9010; website: www.kidney.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Drugs for bacterial infection are usually prescribed. To be sure of a cure, finish the entire prescribed dose even if symptoms improve. If infection is recurrent, drug therapy for 6 months to 2 years may be recommended.
• Drugs to relieve painful urination symptoms may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY

• Reduce activities as needed until symptoms improve.
• Avoid sexual intercourse until you have been free of symptoms for 2 weeks.

DIET

• Drink plenty of fluids daily.
• Drink cranberry juice if recommended by your health care provider.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of a bladder infection.
• Fever develops.
• Blood appears in the urine.
• Symptoms don’t improve in one week.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
• Symptoms return after treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

INFECCION DE LA VEJIGA EN EL HOMBRE (Cistitis en el Hombre) (Bladder Infection, Male [Cystitis in Men]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La infección de la vejiga (cistitis) es una infección de la vejiga urinaria (el órgano que almacena orina). Puede afectar a personas de todas las edades. Después de los 50 años, los hombres son afectados con mayor frecuencia debido a los problemas con la próstata.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Sensación de ardor y de picar al orinar.
• Orinar seguido, aunque la cantidad puede que sea poca.
• Deseos constantes de orinar, aunque la vejiga esté vacía.
• Dolor en la región púbica o dolor en la zona baja de la espalda.
• Secreciones por el pene.
• Sangre en la orina.
• Fiebre baja.
• Mal olor en la orina.
• No ser capaz de controlar la orina.

CAUSAS
La causa más común son las bacterias (o microorganismos) de la piel cercana al recto y a los genitales. Los gérmenes se esparcen a la uretra (el tubo que va desde la vejiga hacia el exterior). Los microorganismos de ahí viajan a la vejiga y producen irritación e inflamación. Los problemas de la próstata en hombres mayores se añaden a las causas.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Obstrucción del tracto urinario. Esto puede ser debido a cálculos renales o un tumor.
• Glándula prostática agrandada.
• Mala higiene.
• Falta de circuncisión (el prepucio puede albergar bacterias).
• Envejecimiento y las condiciones asociadas.
• Uso de un catéter para vaciar la vejiga.
• Falla en vaciar completamente la vejiga.
• Defectos en el tracto urinario.
• Relaciones sexuales por el ano o relaciones sexuales con una mujer infectada.
• Diabetes o un sistema inmunológico débil.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Beba líquidos en abundancia diariamente.
• Use un condón de látex durante el coito. Esto ayuda a prevenir que se propague cualquier infección.
• Evite en lo posible el uso de catéteres.
• Orine cuando sienta que debe hacerlo, vacíe la vejiga completamente y mantenga el área de los genitales limpia.
• Obtenga cuidado médico para cualquier infección de la próstata.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• Generalmente curable con tratamiento.
• Las infecciones con complicaciones en los hombres son en ocasiones más difíciles de tratar.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Infecciones de la vejiga crónicas o recurrentes.
• Infección de los riñones.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica generalmente le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas. Los exámenes médicos incluyen análisis de orina. Se pueden hacer exámenes adicionales para descartar otros trastornos.
• Generalmente el tratamiento es con medicamentos o en ocasiones con cirugía si un defecto físico es la causa.
• Las molestias se pueden aliviar con baños tibios.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: National Kidney Foundation, 30 E. 33rd St., Suite 1100, New York, NY 10016; (800) 622-9010; sitio web: www.kidney.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Generalmente se recetan medicamentos para la infección bacteriana. Para asegurar la curación, termine completamente la dosis recetada aun si los síntomas mejoran. Si la infección es recurrente, se puede recomendar una terapia con medicamentos de 6 meses a 2 años.
• Se pueden recetar medicamentos para aliviar los síntomas del dolor al orinar.

ACTIVIDAD

• Reduzca las actividades según lo necesite hasta que los síntomas mejoren.
• Evite tener relaciones sexuales hasta que transcurran 2 semanas sin síntomas.

DIETA

• Beba líquidos en abundancia diariamente.
• Beba jugo de arándanos agrios si su proveedor de atención médica se lo recomienda.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de infección en la vejiga.
• Tiene fiebre.
• Aparece sangre en la orina.
• Los síntomas no mejoran en 1 semana.
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
• Los síntomas regresan después del tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BLADDER TUMOR

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
A bladder tumor is an abnormal tissue growth in the bladder. It may be cancerous or noncancerous. If the tumor is cancerous, it may spread to lymph nodes, bones, liver, and/or lungs. The tumors are most common in people over age 50 and occur more often in men than women.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• There are often no symptoms in the early stages.
• Blood in the urine.
• Pain or burning when urinating.
• Needing to urinate more frequently. There may be only small amounts of urine passed.
• Fever.
• Unexplained weight loss.

CAUSES
Unknown in some cases. Exposure to cancer-causing substances in the environment may be the cause in some cases.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Smoking.
• Family history of bladder tumors.
• Prior radiation or chemotherapy or having a catheter.
• Exposure to certain industrial dyes, chemicals, paints, solvents, ink, etc.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Avoid exposure to chemical or environmental hazards. Improved methods of protecting workers from chemical hazards have lowered the number of bladder tumors. Regular screening of those who have been exposed in the past is also helpful.
• Don’t smoke.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
When diagnosed early, treatment can be successful. However, it is common for the tumors to return. Regular medical checkups are needed. If cancer has spread, the outcome will depend on many factors.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Spread of cancer to other places in the body, which can be fatal.
• Emotional stress about changes in body image.
• Side effects of treatments such as extreme fatigue.
• Treatment can lead to infertility for men and women.
• Anemia.
• Incontinence.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms. Medical tests include urine studies. A lighted optical instrument (cystoscope) may be used to see inside the bladder. It can also be used to remove a small piece of tissue, or even a small tumor, for viewing under a microscope (biopsy). The tumor may be cancerous or benign. X-ray, MRI, CT, or other tests may be done to see if a cancerous tumor has spread (called staging).
• Treatment may include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy (anticancer drugs), and biologic therapy.
• Small tumors may be removed by fulguration. This involves burning off the tumor by a high frequency electrical current (or with a laser) via the cystoscope.
• Larger tumors are removed surgically. This may mean removal of part or all of the bladder (cystectomy) and other nearby body organs if needed. An alternate method of storing and removing urine may be needed.
• Radiation and biologic therapy (the body’s immune system is used to fight cancer) may be recommended.
• Counseling is helpful in learning to cope with the changes in your body.
• To learn more: American Cancer Society; (800) ACS-2345; website: www.cancer.org or National Cancer Institute; (800) 4-CANCER; website: www.cancer.gov .

MEDICATIONS
Anticancer drugs may be prescribed that are taken by mouth or given through a vein (IV). A catheter may be used to deliver drugs into the bladder itself.

ACTIVITY
Resume your normal activities once your health care provider gives approval. This includes sexual relations.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of a bladder tumor.
• Prescribed drugs produce unexpected side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

TUMOR EN LA VEJIGA (Bladder Tumor) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Un tumor en la vejiga es un crecimiento anormal de tejido en la vejiga. El tumor puede ser canceroso o benigno. Si el tumor es canceroso, puede extenderse a los nódulos linfáticos, los huesos, el hígado y / o los pulmones. Los tumores son más comunes en las personas mayores de 50 años y más frecuentes en los hombres que en las mujeres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• En la fase inicial, por lo general no se presentan síntomas.
• Sangre en la orina.
• Dolor o ardor al orinar.
• Necesidad de orinar con mayor frecuencia. Pero sólo en pequeñas cantidades.
• Fiebre.
• Pérdida inexplicable de peso.

CAUSAS
Desconocidas. En algunos casos parece ser motivado por la exposición a carcinógenos ambientales.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Fumar.
• Antecedentes familiares de tumores en la vejiga.
• Quimioterapia o radioterapia previas, o tener un catéter.
• Exposición a ciertos tintes industriales, productos químicos, pinturas, solventes, tintas, etc.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Evite exponerse a sustancias químicas o ambientales peligrosas. Se ha reducido la incidencia de los tumores en la vejiga mejorando las medidas protectoras para las personas que trabajan con compuestos químicos peligrosos. También pueden ayudar los exámenes sistemáticos a quienes han estado expuestos anteriormente.
• No fume.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Cuando se diagnostica temprano, el tratamiento puede ser exitoso. Sin embargo, es común que los tumores vuelvan, por lo cual es necesario hacerse exámenes regularmente. Si el cáncer se ha propagado, el pronóstico dependerá de muchos factores.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Propagación del cáncer a otras partes del cuerpo, lo que puede resultar fatal.
• Estrés emocional debido a los cambios de imagen del cuerpo.
• Efectos secundarios debido al tratamiento tal como fatiga extrema.
• El tratamiento puede llevar a la infertilidad del hombre y de la mujer.
• Anemia
• Incontinencia.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas. Los exámenes médicos incluyen análisis de la orina. Se puede usar un instrumento óptico iluminado (cistoscopio) para mirar dentro de la vejiga. También puede usarse para remover un pedazo pequeño de tejido o aún un tumor pequeño, para verlo bajo un microscopio (biopsia). El tumor puede ser canceroso o benigno. Pueden hacerse radiografías, imágenes por resonancia magnética, tomografías computarizadas u otros exámenes para ver si el tumor canceroso se ha propagado.
• El tratamiento puede incluir cirugía, radiación, quimioterapia (medicamentos anticancerosos) y terapia biológica.
• Los tumores pequeños pueden removerse con fulguración. Esto se hace quemando el tumor con una corriente eléctrica de alta frecuencia (o con un láser) que pasa a través del cistoscopio.
• Los tumores grandes son removidos quirúrgicamente. Esto puede significar remover parcial o totalmente la vejiga (cistectomía) y los órganos cercanos, si es necesario. Un método alternativo de almacenamiento y eliminación de orina puede ser necesario.
• Puede recomendarse terapia de radiación o biológica (el sistema inmunológico del cuerpo es usado para combatir el cáncer).
• La terapia psicológica puede ayudarle a enfrentar mejor los cambios en su cuerpo.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: American Cancer Society, (800) ACS-2345; sitio web: www.cancer.org . o National Cancer Institute; (800) 4-CANCER; sitio web: www.cancer.gov .

MEDICAMENTOS
Se pueden recetar medicamentos anticancerosos administrados por vía oral o venosa (intravenosamente o IV). Se puede utilizar un catéter para colocar medicamentos dentro de la vejiga misma.

ACTIVIDAD
Reanude las actividades normales una vez que su proveedor de atención médica lo apruebe. Esto incluye las relaciones sexuales.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de un tumor en la vejiga.
• Los medicamentos recetados pueden producir efectos secundarios inesperados.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BLASTOMYCOSIS (North American Blastomycosis; Gilchrist’s Disease)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Blastomycosis is a rare infectious fungal disease that starts in the lungs. It can occasionally spread through the bloodstream to other body parts, especially the skin. Higher rates of the disease are found in parts of the south-central, south-eastern, and mid-western states and the Great Lakes area of the United States and Canada. It is also found in Central and South America and parts of Africa.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• About 50% of those infected have no symptoms.
• Symptoms may begin slowly or may be sudden. They are often flu-like.
• Cough, either wet or dry.
• Chest pain.
• Chills, fever, and sweats.
• Shortness of breath.
• Fatigue, loss of appetite.
• May have bumps or sores on the skin.

CAUSES
Infection with Blastomyces dermatitidis . It is a fungus found in moist soil that has decomposing organic debris. The infection is spread by breathing in airborne spores of the fungus after disturbance of contaminated soil. Symptoms may appear between 3 and 15 weeks after exposure. Blastomycosis is not known to be transmitted from person to person. Animals such as dogs and cats can become infected also.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Exposure to soils where the fungus is located (e.g., farmers, forestry workers, hunters, and campers).
• Weak immune system due to illness or drugs.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Cannot be prevented at present.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Cure rates are high, and the treatment (which may take months) is usually well tolerated.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Complications are more likely in those with weak immune systems due to illness or drugs.
• If not treated, it can spread to other body parts and lead to serious illness and even death. Most often, it involves the skin (and tissue below the skin). Small bumps develop and over time turn into open sores. Other complications can occur in the lungs, bones, scrotum, and prostate.
• Relapse can occur in up to 10% of patients.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam. Questions will be asked about your symptoms, medical history, and lifestyle. Medical tests may include blood tests and lab cultures (of the skin lesions, pus, saliva, or lung secretions). X-rays or a biopsy may be done. Biopsy is when a small amount of tissue is removed for viewing under a microscope.
• Treatment is with drugs and other supportive care. Some patients with mild symptoms may require no treatment. The infection can clear on its own.
• Hospital care may be needed for severe symptoms.
• Keep follow-up appointments with your health care provider. It is important to monitor the treatment and watch for side effects or reactions from the drugs.

MEDICATIONS
An antifungal drug given orally is the treatment of choice for most forms of the disease. For more severe symptoms, the drugs may be given through a vein (IV).

ACTIVITY
Rest in bed if symptoms are more severe. Resume your activities slowly as strength returns.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has blastomycosis symptoms.
• Any of the following occur during treatment:
– Weight loss.
– Fever.
– Diarrhea that cannot be controlled with self-care.
– Severe headache and stiff neck.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

BLASTOMICOSIS (Blastomycosis [North American Blastomycosis; Gilchrist’s Disease]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La blastomicosis es una enfermedad infecciosa de rara ocurrencia, causada por un hongo, que comienza en los pulmones. En ocasiones puede diseminarse a través de la corriente sanguínea a otras partes del cuerpo, especialmente la piel. La incidencia más alta de blastomicosis se encuentra en partes de los estados del centro-sur, sur-este y medio-oeste y en el área de los Lagos Grandes de los Estados Unidos y Canadá. También se lo encuentra en Centroamérica y en América del Sur y en partes de África.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Alrededor del 50% de los infectados no tienen síntomas.
• Los síntomas pueden comenzar lentamente, o pueden ser súbitos. A menudo se parecen a los de la influenza.
• Tos, ya sea con esputo o seca.
• Dolor de pecho.
• Escalofríos, fiebre y sudores.
• Falta de aire.
• Fatiga, falta de apetito.
• Lesiones y abscesos, si ha afectado la piel.

CAUSAS
Infección con Blastomyces dermatitidis . Este es un hongo que se encuentra en la tierra húmeda que tiene restos orgánicos en descomposición. La infección se propaga por la inhalación de las esporas del hongo en el aire después de haber perturbado los suelos contaminados. Los síntomas pueden aparecer entre 3 y 15 semanas después de la exposición. No se sabe si la blastomicosis se transmite de persona a persona. Los animales, como los perros y gatos, también pueden ser infectados.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON
La exposición a los suelos donde se encuentran los hongos (p. ej., agricultores, trabajadores forestales, cazadores y excursionistas).

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No se puede prevenir actualmente.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
El promedio de curación es alto y el tratamiento (que puede llevar meses) generalmente se tolera bien.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Las personas más susceptibles a sufrir complicaciones son aquellas con un sistema inmunológico débil debido a enfermedad o medicamentos. Sin tratamiento, se puede diseminar a otras partes del cuerpo, causando enfermedades graves y hasta la muerte. Con mayor frecuencia, involucra la piel (y el tejido debajo de la piel). Se desarrollan pequeños bultos y con el paso del tiempo se convierten en llagas abiertas. Pueden presentarse otras complicaciones en los pulmones, huesos, escroto y próstata. La infección puede recurrir en hasta el 10% de los pacientes.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen médico. Se le harán preguntas acerca de sus síntomas, historial médico y estilo de vida. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir análisis de sangre y cultivos de laboratorio (de las lesiones de la piel, pus, saliva o secreciones pulmonares). Se puede hacer radiografías y biopsia. En una biopsia una pequeña cantidad de tejido es extirpado y examinado bajo un microscopio.
• Tratamiento con medicamentos y demás cuidados necesarios. Puede que algunos pacientes que presentan síntomas leves no requieran tratamiento. La infección puede desaparecer por sí sola.
• La hospitalización puede ser necesaria cuando los síntomas son graves.
• Acuda a las citas de seguimiento con el proveedor de atención médica. Es importante observar el tratamiento y vigilar los efectos secundarios o las reacciones que pueden causar los medicamentos.

MEDICAMENTOS
En la mayoría de las formas de la enfermedad, se prefiere dar medicamentos antimicóticos (también llamados antifúngicos) por vía oral. Cuando los síntomas son más graves, se pueden administrar los medicamentos a través de las venas (IV).

ACTIVIDAD
Guarde cama si los síntomas son más graves. Reanude gradualmente sus actividades a medida que vaya recobrando las fuerzas.

DIETA
Ninguna dieta especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tienen síntomas de blastomicosis.
• Durante el tratamiento ocurre algo de lo siguiente:
– Pérdida de peso.
– Fiebre.
– Diarrea que no se controla con autocuidado.
– Dolor de cabeza fuerte y rigidez en el cuello.
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BLEPHARITIS

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Blepharitis is an inflammation (redness and soreness) of the eyelid edges. It usually involves the eyelids and eyelashes. It can also include the glands that lubricate the lid, and the white area of the eye.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Redness and greasy flakes on the eyelid edges.
• Small sores on the eyelid. Crusts may form on the edges of the eyelid.
• Discharge from the lids during sleep. Lids may be stuck together in the morning.
• A feeling that something is in the eye. This can cause itching, burning, redness, and swelling of the lid. May also have tearing and be sensitive to bright light.
• Eye may be irritated.
• Eyelashes that fall out.

CAUSES

• Seborrheic blepharitis is caused by a skin condition called seborrhea. It is similar to dandruff.
• Bacterial infection of the eyelash follicles and the glands that lubricate the eye. The infection cannot be spread from one person to another.
• Plugged glands on the eyelid.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Dermatitis (skin infection).
• Acne rosacea.
• Allergen (substance that causes an allergy) exposure.
• Exposure to chemical or environmental irritants, such as smoke or smog.
• Work that keeps the hands dirty for most of the day.
• Elderly.
• Diabetes.
• Dry eye syndrome.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Wash hands often, and dry them with clean towels.
• Keep face, eyelids, and scalp clean.
• Avoid places where dust or air pollutants are heavy.
• Get treatment for any skin disorders.
• Control dandruff with anti-dandruff shampoos.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Symptoms can be improved with treatment. The condition is usually chronic and the symptoms come and go. If treatment is stopped, it tends to recur. It is usually not a serious condition. Complications are rare.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Styes or chalazia (blocked oil gland on the eyelid).
• Conjunctivitis (eye inflammation).
• Loss of eyelashes or they grow in misdirected.
• Ulceration of the cornea (the covering of the eye).
• Scarred eyelids.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider can diagnose blepharitis by an exam of the affected eyelid area. Other medical tests are not usually needed.
• Treatment will be prescribed for any problem that is causing the disorder or any complications.
• Warm soaks and keeping eyelids clean are usually advised for self-care.
– For soaks, dampen a clean washcloth with warm water and place it over closed eyes. Do this four times a day, for about five minutes each time. Later on, you may apply the compress once a day, for a few minutes.
– Cleansing the eyelids is important. Clean them twice a day with: warm water only, baby shampoo diluted with warm water, or a special product made for cleaning the lids. Dip a clean washcloth, cotton swab, or gauze pad into the cleaning solution. Gently wipe it across your lashes and lid margin. Rinse with cool water and dry the area.
• Avoid use of eye makeup until symptoms improve. When used, be sure to remove it each night at bedtime.
• Ask your health care provider about using contact lenses while you have the symptoms. You may need to temporarily discontinue their use.

MEDICATIONS

• Eye drops or ointment may be prescribed for use after the eyelid area is cleaned.
• Use artificial tears solution for dry eyes.
• Drugs to be taken by mouth may be prescribed in more severe cases.

ACTIVITY
No limits.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of blepharitis.
• You have pain in the eye(s).
• Your vision changes.
• Symptoms recur after treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

BLEFARITIS (Blepharitis) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La blefaritis es una inflamación (enrojecimiento y dolor) de los bordes de los párpados. Generalmente afecta los párpados y las pestañas. Puede también afectar las glándulas que lubrican el párpado y el área blanca del ojo.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Enrojecimiento y escamas grasosas en los bordes del párpado.
• Úlceras pequeñas en el párpado. Se pueden formar costras en los bordes del párpado.
• Secreciones de los párpados que pueden pegar las pestañas durante el sueño.
• Una sensación de tener algo dentro del ojo. Esto puede causar picazón, escozor, enrojecimiento e hinchazón del párpado. Puede también tener lagrimeo y sensibilidad a las luces brillantes.
• Irritación posible del ojo.
• Las pestañas se caen.

CAUSAS

• La blefaritis seborreica es causada por una condición de la piel llamada seborrea. Es similar a la caspa.
• Infección bacteriana de los folículos de las pestañas y de las glándulas que lubrican el ojo. La infección no puede ser transmitida de una persona a otra.
• Glándulas obstruidas en el párpado.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Dermatitis (infección en la piel).
• Rosácea.
• Exposición a alérgenos (sustancias que causan reacciones alérgicas).
• Exposición a irritantes químicos o ambientales, tales como humo o niebla tóxica (smog).
• Trabajos que mantienen las manos sucias por la mayor parte del día.
• Edad avanzada.
• Diabetes.
• Síndrome de ojo seco.
MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Lávese las manos frecuentemente y séqueselas con toallas limpias.
• Mantenga la cara, los párpados y el cuero cabelludo limpios.
• Evite lugares donde haya mucho polvo u otros contaminantes del aire.
• Obtenga tratamiento para cualquier trastorno de la piel.
• Controle la caspa con un champú anticaspa.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Los síntomas pueden mejorar con tratamiento. La condición es frecuentemente crónica y los síntomas van y vienen. Si se descontinúa el tratamiento, tiende a recurrir. Generalmente no es una condición seria. Las complicaciones son infrecuentes.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Orzuelos o chalazión (bloqueo de la glándula aceitosa en el párpado).
• Conjuntivitis (inflamación del ojo).
• Pérdida o crecimiento desordenado de las pestañas.
• Ulceración de la córnea (la cubierta del ojo).
• Cicatrices en los párpados.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica puede diagnosticar blefaritis examinando el área afectada del párpado. Otros exámenes médicos generalmente no son necesarios.
• Se le prescribirá un tratamiento para el problema que está causando el trastorno o cualquier complicación.
• Para autocuidado generalmente se recomiendan compresas de agua tibia y mantener sus párpados limpios.
– Para remojar sus ojos, humedezca una toallita limpia con agua tibia y colóquela sobre sus ojos cerrados. Haga esto cuatro veces al día por aproximadamente cinco minutos en cada ocasión. Más adelante, usted puede aplicarse las compresas solamente una vez al día, por unos pocos minutos.
– Lavarse los párpados es importante. Láveselos dos veces al día, utilizando solamente agua tibia, champú para bebé diluido en agua tibia o un producto especial para limpiar los párpados. Enjuague una toallita, un palito de algodón o un poco de gasa en la solución. Suavemente restriegue sus pestañas y el borde de sus párpados. Enjuáguese con agua fría y séquese.
• Evite usar maquillaje en los ojos hasta que mejoren los síntomas. Cuando lo use, asegúrese de removerlo cada noche antes de acostarse.
• Consulte con su proveedor de atención médica acerca de usar lentes de contacto mientras tiene síntomas. Puede ser necesario que descontinúe su uso por un tiempo.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se le pueden recetar gotas para los ojos o pomadas para aplicarlas después de limpiar sus párpados.
• Use una solución de lágrimas artificiales para ojos secos.
• Se le pueden recetar medicamentos orales en casos más graves.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin restricciones.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de blefaritis.
• Siente dolor en uno o ambos ojos.
• Tiene cambios en la vista.
• Los síntomas vuelven a ocurrir después del tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BOILS (Furuncles)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Boils are a painful, bacterial infection of a hair follicle. They are common and somewhat contagious. They can occur anywhere on the skin, but most often appear on the neck, face, buttocks, and breasts. Carbuncles are clusters of boils that occur when the infection spreads.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• A domed nodule that is painful, tender, red, and is filled with pus. Boils can appear suddenly and ripen in 24 hours.
• Fever (rarely).
• Swelling of the closest lymph glands.

CAUSES
Infection, usually from Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The bacteria (germs) normally live on the skin surface or in the nose. The germs may enter a damaged (such as from a razor cut) hair follicle and get into the skin’s deeper layers.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Poor nutrition or poor hygiene.
• Diabetes.
• Other skin problems (such as acne or skin infection).
• Weak immune system due to illness or drugs.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Keep the skin clean.
• If someone in the household has a boil, don’t share towels, washcloths, or clothing with that person.
• If you have a chronic disease (such as diabetes), be sure to follow your medical regimen.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Without treatment, a boil will heal in 10 to 20 days. With treatment, the boil should heal in less time, symptoms will be less severe, and new boils should not appear. The pus that drains when a boil opens on its own may infect nearby skin, causing new boils.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• The infection may enter the bloodstream and spread to other body parts.
• Scarring.
• Boils may recur.
• Family members may need treatment.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider can diagnose boils by an exam of the affected skin area. A medical study may be made of the material (pus) from the boil.
• Do not squeeze the boil or pop it with a needle. Doing so may make the infection worse.
• You may be advised to gently soak the area with a warm, moist cloth. Do this 3 or 4 times daily for 20 minutes. If the boil starts to drain, wash the area with soap and apply a loose bandage. Wash your hands carefully after touching the boil.
• Prevent the spread of boils by using clean towels only once or using paper towels and discarding them.
• Your health care provider’s treatment may include incision and drainage of the boil.

MEDICATIONS
Antibiotics to be taken by mouth may be prescribed if infection is severe.

ACTIVITY
Usually no limits. Athletes involved in contact sports should ask their health care provider and their coaches about sports participation.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has a boil.
• The following occur during treatment:
– Symptoms don’t improve in 3 to 4 days, despite treatment.
– New boils appear.
– Fever.
– Other family members develop boils.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

FORUNCULOS (Boils [Furuncles]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Los forúnculos son una infección bacteriana dolorosa y profunda de un folículo de pelo. Son comunes y ligeramente contagiosos. Los forúnculos pueden aparecer en cualquier parte de la piel, pero son más comunes en el cuello, la cara, las nalgas y los senos. Los carbúnculos son grupos de forúnculos que aparecen cuando la infección se extiende.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Un nódulo redondeado doloroso, sensible, enrojecido y lleno de pus. Los forúnculos pueden aparecer repentinamente y madurar en 24 horas.
• Fiebre (rara vez).
• Inflamación de las glándulas linfáticas más cercanas.

CAUSAS
Infección, generalmente causada por la bacteria estafilococo aureus. Las bacterias (microorganismos) normalmente viven en la superficie de la piel o en la nariz. Los microorganismos pueden penetrar en un folículo de pelo dañado (como por un corte de navaja) y entrar en las capas más profundas de la piel.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Mala nutrición o mala higiene.
• Diabetes.
• Otros problemas de la piel (tales como acné o infección de la piel).
• Un sistema inmunológico debilitado debido a enfermedades o medicamentos.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Mantenga la piel limpia.
• Si alguien en su casa tiene un forúnculo, no comparta toallas, toallitas o ropa con dicha persona.
• Si padece de una enfermedad crónica (tal como diabetes), siga estrictamente el régimen médico indicado.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Sin tratamiento, un forúnculo sanará en 10 a 20 días. Con tratamiento, el forúnculo debería sanar en menos tiempo, los síntomas serán menos graves y no deberían aparecer forúnculos nuevos. El pus que drena cuando un forúnculo se abre espontáneamente puede infectar otros sitios de la piel, causando nuevos forúnculos.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• La infección puede penetrar la corriente sanguínea y extenderse a otras partes del cuerpo.
• Cicatrices.
• Los forúnculos pueden recurrir.
• Miembros de la familia pueden necesitar tratamiento.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le puede diagnosticar forúnculos con un examen de la piel afectada. Se puede hacer un análisis médico de la materia (pus) del forúnculo.
• No apriete ni reviente el furúnculo con una aguja. El hacerlo puede empeorar la infección.
• Se le puede aconsejar que se aplique suavemente compresas de agua tibia. Hágalo 3 ó 4 veces por día por 20 minutos. Si el forúnculo comienza a drenar, lave el área con jabón y aplique una venda floja. Lávese las manos cuidadosamente después de haber tocado el forúnculo. Prevenga la diseminación de forúnculos usando toallas limpias solo una vez o usando toallas de papel desechables.
• El tratamiento médico puede incluir incisión y drenaje del forúnculo.

MEDICAMENTOS
Le pueden recetar antibióticos por vía oral si la infección es grave.

ACTIVIDAD
Generalmente sin límites. Los atletas que participan en deportes de contacto deben preguntar a su proveedor de salud y a sus entrenadores sobre su participación en los deportes.

DIETA
Ninguna en particular.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene forúnculos.
• Durante el tratamiento ocurre lo siguiente:
– Los síntomas no mejoran en 3 ó 4 días, a pesar del tratamiento.
– Aparecen forúnculos nuevos.
– Fiebre.
– Se manifiestan forúnculos en otros miembros de su familia.
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BONE FRACTURE

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Bone fracture is a break in a bone. Different types of fractures can occur depending on the severity. A complete fracture means the bone is broken all the way through. An incomplete fracture means the bone is cracked. An open (or compound) fracture means the fractured bone sticks out through the skin. A stress fracture is a small crack in a bone due to overuse.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Pain, swelling, or tenderness near the fracture site.
• Paleness and deformity (sometimes).
• Bleeding or bruising at the site.
• Weakness.
• Cannot bear weight.
• Numbness, tingling, or paralysis below the fracture (rare; this is an emergency).

CAUSES
The bone can’t withstand a physical force exerted on it.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Activities that carry the risk of injury.
• Reckless behavior that increases risks of an accident.
• Age. Older adults have bones that are more fragile and also tend to have more falls.
• Osteoporosis and osteopenia.
• Tumors of the bone or bone marrow.
• Sports activities.
• Stress fracture risk factors include: females, menstrual problems, poor physical condition, running or jumping sports, loss of bone density, and overweight.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• May not always be preventable.
• Avoid high risk behaviors (e.g., drinking and driving).
• Wear seatbelts when driving or riding in a vehicle.
• Wear proper protective gear for sports.
• Maintain healthy bones with diet and exercise. Talk to your health care provider about taking calcium and vitamin D supplements.
• Maintain a safe home. Take measures to prevent falls.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Usually curable with treatment. Healing time varies. Recovery is complete when there is no bone motion at the fracture site, and x-rays show complete healing.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Failure to heal (non-union).
• Shock from blood loss.
• Travel of a fat embolus (clump of fat cells) from the injury site to the lungs or brain.
• Obstruction of nearby arteries.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Call 911 for help. Give first-aid treatment for bleeding, cover any open wounds, and move the patient as little as possible. Try to immobilize the area. Don’t try to set the bone. Arrange for transport to a hospital or emergency room.
• Your health care provider will do a physical exam of the injured area. X-rays will be done to confirm the bone fracture. In some cases, other tests are needed.
• Treatment will depend on the specific fracture.
• Bone ends that have been displaced are maneuvered back into place (reduction).
• Most fractures require casts, splints, or a special brace for healing. Crutches or other aids may be used to walk.
• Hospital care may be needed for severe fractures.
• Surgery may be needed. The fracture may be repaired with rods, plates, or screws.

MEDICATIONS
Pain relievers and muscle relaxants may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY

• Immobility of a bone for a long period of time can cause loss of muscle mass, stiffness in nearby joints, and edema (excess fluid in the tissues). Begin to use the affected part as soon as is safely possible.
• Physical therapy may be prescribed to maintain flexibility of the joint and provide strength to the muscles.
• Resume normal activities as soon as symptoms improve and your health care provider advises you to.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of a bone fracture.
• The following occur after treatment:
– Swelling above or below the fracture site.
– Severe, persistent pain.
– Blue or gray skin below fracture site (e.g., in fingernails); numbness or loss of feeling below fracture site.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

FRACTURA DE HUESO (Bone Fracture) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La fractura de hueso es una rotura en un hueso. Diferentes tipos de fracturas pueden ocurrir dependiendo de la seriedad. Una fractura completa significa que el hueso roto está completamente separado. Una fractura incompleta significa que el hueso está agrietado. Una fractura abierta o compuesta significa que el hueso fracturado ha atravesado la piel y está expuesto. Una fractura de estrés es una pequeña grieta en un hueso debido al sobreuso.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Dolor, hinchazón y sensibilidad cerca del área fracturada.
• Palidez y deformidad (a veces).
• Hemorragia o hematoma en el lugar.
• Debilidad.
• Incapacidad de cargar cosas pesadas.
• Entumecimiento, hormigueo o parálisis debajo de la fractura (rara vez; pero esto es una emergencia).

CAUSAS
El hueso no puede aguantar una fuerza física ejercida sobre él.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Actividades que implican riesgo de lesionarse.
• Conducta imprudente que aumenta el riesgo de un accidente.
• Edad. Las personas mayores tienen huesos más frágiles y también tienden a caerse más seguido.
• Osteoporosis y osteopenia.
• Tumor en el hueso o en la médula ósea.
• Actividades deportivas.
• Los factores de riesgo en la fractura de estrés incluyen: mujeres, problemas menstruales, mala condición física, deportes donde se corre o salta, pérdida de la densidad ósea y sobrepeso.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• No siempre se puede prevenir.
• Evite comportamientos de alto riesgo, (p. ej., beber alcohol y manejar).
• Póngase el cinturón de seguridad al manejar o cuando va de pasajero en un vehículo.
• Use equipo protector al practicar deportes.
• Mantenga huesos saludables con dieta y ejercicios. Hable con su proveedor de atención médica acerca de tomar suplementos de calcio y vitamina D.
• Mantenga un ambiente seguro en su casa. Tome medidas para prevenir las caídas.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• Normalmente es curable si recibe tratamiento.
• El tiempo de curación varía. La recuperación es total cuando no hay movimiento del hueso en el lugar de la fractura y las radiografías indican una sanación completa.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• No sanar (el hueso no se une).
• Shock por pérdida de sangre.
• Traslado de un émbolo graso (masa de células grasas) del lugar de la lesión a los pulmones o al cerebro.
• Obstrucción de las arterias adyacentes.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Llame por ayuda al 911. Dé primeros auxilios para detener la pérdida de sangre, cubrir toda herida expuesta y mover al paciente lo menos posible. Trate de inmovilizar el área. No trate de colocar el hueso en su lugar. Haga los arreglos para traslado al hospital o sala de emergencias.
• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico del área lesionada. Se harán radiografías para confirmar la fractura del hueso. En algunos casos, otros exámenes son necesarios.
• El tratamiento dependerá de la fractura específica.
• Se vuelven a colocar en su lugar los extremos desplazados del hueso (reducción).
• Casi todas las fracturas requieren inmovilización por medio de yeso, entablillado o aparatos ortopédicos especiales para curación. Puede necesitar muletas u otra ayuda para caminar.
• La hospitalización puede ser necesaria para fracturas graves.
• Se puede necesitar cirugía. La fractura puede ser reparada por medio de varillas, placas o tornillos.

MEDICAMENTOS
Se le pueden prescribir analgésicos y relajantes musculares.

ACTIVIDAD

• La inmovilización de un hueso por un periodo largo de tiempo puede causar pérdida de la masa muscular, rigidez de las articulaciones adyacentes y edema (acumulación de líquido en los tejidos). Comience a usar la parte afectada con prudencia tan pronto le sea posible.
• Se puede recomendar fisioterapia para mantener la flexibilidad de las articulaciones y la fortaleza de los músculos.
• Reanude sus actividades normales tan pronto mejoren los síntomas y su proveedor de atención médica lo apruebe.

DIETA
Ninguna en particular.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia presenta síntomas de haberse fracturado un hueso.
• Después del tratamiento ocurre lo siguiente:
– Hinchazón encima o debajo del lugar de la fractura.
– Dolor agudo y persistente.
– Color azulado o grisáceo en la piel debajo del lugar de la fractura (p. ej., en las uñas); entumecimiento o pérdida de sensación debajo del lugar de la fractura.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BOTULISM

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION

• Botulism is a rare bacterial illness. Types include:
– Foodborne botulism is a serious form of food poisoning that is usually caused by eating food contaminated with a botulinum toxin. This toxin affects both the central nervous system and the muscular system. Symptoms usually appear suddenly 18 to 36 hours (but can range anywhere from 2 hours to 1 week) after eating contaminated food. It can affect all ages.
• Infant botulism is a special type that occurs in children less than 12 months of age.
• Wound botulism occurs when the toxin in a wound spreads to other body parts.
• Adult intestinal colonization botulism occurs in older children and adults with abnormal bowel (e.g., colitis).
• Injection-related type and inhalation type also exist.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Blurred or double vision and drooping eyelids.
• Dry mouth.
• Slurred speech.
• Trouble swallowing.
• Vomiting and diarrhea.
• Weakness of the arms and legs. Paralysis.
• No fever.
• No change in mental abilities.
• In infants: severe constipation, feeble cry, and unable to suck.

CAUSES

• A bacteria germ, Clostridium botulinum (other types may, rarely, be the cause). The germ may be found in contaminated or incompletely cooked foods. It can also be found in improperly canned foods. The germ generates a strong poison that is absorbed from the digestive tract. The poison spreads to the central nervous system.
• Foods likely to cause botulism include home-canned vegetables and fruits. Also, fish, smoked meats, milk products, and undercooked sausage.
• Honey and corn syrup may cause botulism in infants.
• The bacteria may also contaminate a wound and produce the toxin.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Infants.
• Home-canned foods.
• IV drug abuse (e.g., cocaine) for wound botulism.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• If a can of food is bulging, don’t even open it. If the contents of a can have a strange color or odor, don’t even taste the food. Throw it away (safely).
• Don’t eat any foods that may not have been properly cooked or canned.
• Don’t give infants under age 1 honey or corn syrup, not even a small taste.
• Get proper instructions about canning food.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
With prompt treatment, the outlook is good.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Long-lasting weakness.
• Nervous system problems that can last up to a year.
• Lung infections, such as pneumonia.
• Respiratory failure caused by weak breathing muscles. It can lead to death.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Diagnosis and treatment involves emergency hospital care. Blood and stool studies can confirm the diagnosis.
• For foodborne infection, vomiting may be induced, enemas given, or a washing out (lavage) of the stomach may be done to help rid the body of the toxin.
• Wound care will be provided for infected wounds.
• Breathing support with a machine (ventilator) may be needed, along with other supportive-care measures.
• Fluids may be given through a vein (IV) or through a tube placed in the nose (nasogastric).
• Health care providers will report the disease to state or federal health authorities. They will arrange to remove any contaminated food from stores.
• If you suspect botulism, refrigerate some of the contaminated food for testing, if possible.

MEDICATIONS
A special drug (antitoxin) may be given by injection. It can prevent the symptoms from getting worse. It may be life-saving, but it has serious side effects.

ACTIVITY
Bed rest during treatment. Resume normal activities as your strength permits.

DIET
After treatment, no special diet is needed.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF
You or a family member has symptoms of botulism. Call 911 or an ambulance right away. This is an emergency!
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

BOTULISMO (Botulism) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION

• El botulismo es una enfermedad bacteriana poco común. Los tipos de botulismo incluyen:
– El botulismo transmitido por alimentos es un tipo serio de envenenamiento por alimentos que generalmente es causado por ingerir alimentos contaminados por una toxina botulínica. Esta toxina afecta tanto al sistema nervioso central como al sistema muscular. Los síntomas en general aparecen súbitamente, 18 a 36 horas (pero el rango puede variar de 2 horas a 1 semana) después de ingerir alimentos contaminados. Puede afectar a todas las edades.
• El botulismo infantil es un tipo especial que ocurre en niños menores de 12 meses de edad.
• El botulismo por herida ocurre cuando la toxina en una herida se propaga a otras partes del cuerpo.
• El botulismo en adultos por colonización intestinal ocurre en los niños mayores y en adultos con un intestino anormal (p. ej., colitis).
• También existen tipos relacionados a inyecciones o a inhalación.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Visión borrosa o doble y párpados caídos.
• Sequedad en la boca.
• Problemas al hablar.
• Dificultad para tragar.
• Vómitos y diarrea.
• Debilidad en los brazos y piernas. Parálisis.
• No se presenta fiebre.
• No hay cambios en las habilidades mentales.
• En bebés: estreñimiento fuerte, llanto débil e, incapacidad para chupar.

CAUSAS

• Un microorganismo bacteriano, Clostridium botulinum (en muy pocas ocasiones otros tipos pueden ser la causa). Los gérmenes pueden encontrarse en alimentos contaminados o no bien cocidos. También puede hallarse en alimentos enlatados incorrectamente. El germen genera un veneno potente que es absorbido en el tracto digestivo. El veneno se propaga al sistema nervioso central.
• Los alimentos con mayor probabilidad de ser la causa del botulismo incluyen las frutas y vegetales enlatados en el hogar, al igual que el pescado, las carnes ahumadas, los productos lácteos y las salchichas poco cocidas.
• La miel y el jarabe de maíz pueden causar botulismo en los infantes.
• La bacteria también puede contaminar una herida y producir la toxina.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Bebés.
• Alimentos enlatados en casa.
• Abuso de drogas intravenosas (p. ej., cocaína) para el botulismo por heridas.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Si una lata de alimentos está hinchada, no la abra. Si los contenidos de una lata tienen color u olor extraño, ni siquiera pruebe el alimento y tírelo a la basura (en forma segura).
• No coma alimentos que pueden no haber sido cocidos o enlatados correctamente.
• No le dé a comer miel o jarabe de maíz a los infantes menores de 1 año de edad, ni siquiera para probar.
• Obtenga las instrucciones correctas para enlatar los alimentos.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
El pronóstico es bueno, con tratamiento rápido.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Debilidad duradera.
• Problemas del sistema nervioso que pueden durar hasta un año.
• Infecciones pulmonares, tales como neumonía.
• Fallo respiratorio causado por músculos respiratorios débiles, que puede llevar a la muerte.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• El diagnóstico y tratamiento consiste en hospitalización de emergencia. Los análisis de sangre y de excreta pueden confirmar el diagnóstico.
• Para las infecciones trasmitidas por alimentos, se pueden inducir vómitos, se pueden administrar enemas o se puede hacer un lavado del estómago para ayudarle al cuerpo a eliminar la toxina.
• Se proveerá cuidado para las heridas infectadas.
• Puede necesitarse apoyo respiratorio con una máquina (ventilador), junto con otras medidas para ayudarle con el cuidado.
• Se pueden administrar fluidos por vía intravenosa o a través de un tubo colocado en la nariz (nasogástrico).
• Los proveedores de atención médica harán un informe acerca de la enfermedad a las autoridades federales o estatales de la salud. Estos harán arreglos para remover cualquier alimento contaminado de las tiendas.
• Si usted sospecha padecer de botulismo, refrigere parte del alimento contaminado para hacerle pruebas, si es posible.

MEDICAMENTOS
Se puede dar un medicamento especial (antitoxina) por inyección, el cual puede prevenir que empeoren los síntomas. Puede salvarle la vida pero tiene efectos secundarios serios.

ACTIVIDAD
Descanso en cama durante el tratamiento. Reanude las actividades normales según se lo permita su fortaleza.

DIETA
Después del tratamiento, no se requiere ninguna dieta especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI
Usted o un miembro de su familia presentan síntomas de botulismo. Llame al 911 o a una ambulancia inmediatamente; ¡es una emergencia!
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BRAIN OR EPIDURAL ABSCESS

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
A brain or epidural abscess is a collection of pus caused by infection. The abscess can develop in the brain or in the epidural space. This is the space between the covering (membrane) of the brain or spinal cord and the bones. Abscesses can affect all ages. They are more common in men than in women.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• The following symptoms usually appear gradually over several hours. They resemble symptoms of a brain tumor or stroke:
– Headache, usually severe.
– Fever.
– Stiff neck.
– Confusion or delirium.
– Seizures (convulsions).
– Nausea and vomiting.
– Pain in the back. It may occur if the infection is in the covering of the spinal cord.
– One side of the body may feel numb or weak. The body may be paralyzed on one side.
– Unable to walk normally.
– Trouble speaking.

CAUSES

• An infection that spreads from another part of the head such as sinusitis or a middle ear infection.
• An infection due to a head injury or surgery.
• An infection that spreads through the blood from other infected organs. This includes the lungs, skin, heart valves, or dental infections.
• Infections, such as fungal or protozoan, that occur in people with weak immune systems.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Head injury.
• Chronic illness, such as diabetes, AIDS, or cancer.
• Recent infection (in the ears, nose, eyes, or face).
• Weak immune system due to illness or drugs.
• IV drug abuse.
• Congenital (born with) heart disease.
• Tongue piercing.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• None specific. To reduce risk factors:
– Seek medical care for infections.
– Wear protective headgear when you are involved in any activity that could lead to a head injury.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Treatment is usually successful with early diagnosis and treatment. Most people recover completely. Some may have mild speech, movement, or memory problems that may improve with time.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Seizures, coma, and death (without treatment).
• Rupture of the abscess.
• Brain hemorrhage.
• Brain damage that can lead to permanent disability or learning difficulties.
• Meningitis (more widespread infection).

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Emergency hospital care is needed.
• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms and activities. Medical tests may include blood tests, CT, and MRI.
• Medical or surgical treatment will depend on the location of the infection. Usually, surgery is needed to drain the infected area. Drugs will be given for the infection.
• Breathing support with a machine (ventilator) may be needed, along with other supportive-care measures. Fluids may be given through a vein (IV).

MEDICATIONS

• Antibiotic drugs will be given for the infection. They may be continued for several weeks.
• Drugs to prevent seizures may be prescribed.
• Following surgery, you may be given drugs to reduce swelling.

ACTIVITY
While in the hospital, you will need bed rest. After a 2 to 3 week recovery, you should be as active as your strength and feeling of well-being allow.

DIET
While you are in the hospital, essential fluids may be given through a tube in a vein. Following treatment, eat a normal, well-balanced diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has any symptoms of a brain abscess.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ABSCESO CEREBRAL O EPIDURAL (Brain or Epidural Abscess) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Un absceso cerebral o epidural es una acumulación de pus causada por una infección. El absceso puede desarrollarse en el cerebro o en el espacio epidural. Este es el espacio entre el recubrimiento (membranas) que revisten el cerebro o la médula espinal y los huesos. Los abscesos pueden afectar a personas de cualquier edad. Son más frecuentes en los hombres que en las mujeres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Los siguientes síntomas generalmente aparecen gradualmente a través de varias horas y son parecidos a los síntomas de un tumor cerebral o un accidente cerebrovascular (apoplejía).
– Dolor de cabeza, generalmente fuerte.
– Fiebre
– Cuello rígido.
– Confusión o delirio.
– Convulsiones.
– Náusea y vómitos.
– Dolor en la espalda. Puede ocurrir si la infección es en la medula espinal.
– Un lado del cuerpo puede sentirse débil o adormecido. El cuerpo puede estar paralizado en un lado.
– Dificultad para caminar normalmente.
– Dificultad al hablar.

CAUSAS

• Infección que se propaga desde otra parte de la cabeza, tal como sinusitis o una infección del oído medio.
• Infección debido a una lesión o cirugía en la cabeza.
• Infección que se propaga a través de la sangre desde otro órgano infectado. Esto incluye los pulmones, piel, válvulas cardiacas o infecciones dentales.
• Infecciones, tales como infecciones fúngicas o protozoarias, que ocurren en las personas con sistemas inmunológicos débiles.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Lesión en la cabeza.
• Enfermedad crónica, tal como diabetes, SIDA o cáncer.
• Infección reciente, especialmente en los oídos, ojos o cara.
• Sistema inmunológico débil debido a una enfermedad o medicamentos.
• Abuso de drogas intravenosas.
• Enfermedad cardiaca congénita.
• Perforación de la lengua.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Ninguna medida específica. Para reducir los factores de riesgo:
– Busque atención médica para las infecciones.
– Use un casco cuando está involucrado en cualquier actividad que podría conducir a una lesión en la cabeza.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Generalmente puede ser curado con diagnóstico y tratamiento tempranos.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Convulsiones, coma o muerte (sin tratamiento).
• Ruptura del absceso.
• Hemorragia cerebral.
• Daño cerebral que puede conducir a invalidez permanente o dificultades de aprendizaje.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Requiere hospitalización inmediata de emergencia.
• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas y actividades. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir análisis de sangre, tomografía computarizada e imágenes de resonancia magnética.
• El tratamiento médico o quirúrgico dependerá de la localización de la infección. Generalmente, se requiere cirugía para drenar el área infectada. Se darán medicamentos para la infección.
• Puede requerirse asistencia respiratoria con una máquina (ventilador), junto con medidas de cuidado de apoyo. Se pueden suministrar fluidos por vía intravenosa.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se darán medicamentos antibióticos para la infección y estos pueden continuarse por varias semanas.
• Se pueden recetar medicamentos para prevenir las convulsiones.
• Después de la cirugía, le pueden dar medicamentos para reducir la hinchazón.

ACTIVIDAD
Necesitará reposar en cama mientras está en el hospital. Después de 2 a 3 semanas de recuperación, podrá estar tan activo como su fuerza y bienestar le permitan.

DIETA
Mientras está en el hospital, le pueden dar fluidos esenciales a través de un tubo en una vena. Después del tratamiento ingiera una dieta normal y balanceada.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia presenta síntomas de un absceso cerebral.
• Aparecen síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BRAIN TUMOR

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
A brain tumor is an abnormal cell growth in the brain. The growth may be benign (noncancerous) or malignant (cancerous). The symptoms can be caused by pressure as the tumor gets larger, or can be caused by the location, size, and type of tumor. Brain tumors can affect any age group.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Headache that is worse when lying down.
• Seizures (convulsions).
• Memory loss, confusion, and loss of concentration.
• Personality and behavior changes.
• Vomiting or nausea.
• Problems with vision. This includes double vision.
• Weakness on one side of the body.
• Lack of balance and dizziness.
• Loss of sense of smell and hearing.

CAUSES
Exact cause is unknown. There are genetic factors and environmental factors involved. Some tumors begin in the brain and are called primary. Other brain tumors are called secondary. They have spread (metastasized) from other cancers in the body. These include cancers of the breast, lungs, colon, or skin (melanoma).

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Unknown for most brain tumors.
• Radiation to the head for other cancer treatment.
• Rarely, certain types of tumors run in families.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
No specific preventive measures are known.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
The outcome depends on several factors. These include type of tumor, its size, location, spread of tumor, other cancer in the body, age and health of the patient, and the patient’s response to treatment.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Long-term physical and mental side effects. They may be due to the effect of the tumor or to treatment.
• Tumor may recur after treatment.
• Death.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms and activities. A variety of medical tests will be done to diagnose the tumor and to see if it has spread to or from other places in the body (called staging).
• The treatment plan will be determined by the tumor’s size, location, type, stage, and your age and health status. Because there are over 120 different types of brain tumors, treatment needs to be specific for each person.
• Treatment can include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy (anticancer drugs), and targeted drug therapy (kill specific cancer cells).
• Surgery is often needed. It may involve removal of all or part of the tumor and nearby tissue.
• Radiation may be used for certain stages of the tumor. It is normally not used for children under age 3.
• Immunotherapy uses the body’s immune system to help fight the cancer.
• Treatment may involve steps to relieve symptoms and make you comfortable, rather than treating the tumor.
• To learn more: American Brain Tumor Association, 2720 River Road, Des Plaines, IL 60018; (800) 886-2282; website: www.abta.org or National Brain Tumor Foundation, 22 Battery Street, Suite 612, San Francisco, CA 94111; (800) 934-2873; website: www.braintumor.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Your health care provider may prescribe:
– Drugs to reduce swelling of the brain tissue.
– Drugs to control seizures.
– Pain relievers.
– Drugs that kill cancer cells (chemotherapy).
– Targeted drugs to kill specific cancer cells.

ACTIVITY
Stay as active as your strength allows.

DIET
Eat a normal, well-balanced diet. You may need to take vitamins and minerals if you cannot eat normally.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has brain tumor symptoms.
• New, unexplained symptoms occur during treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

TUMOR CEREBRAL (Brain Tumor) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Un tumor cerebral es un crecimiento anormal en el cerebro. El crecimiento puede ser benigno (no canceroso) o maligno (canceroso). Los síntomas pueden ser causados por la presión, a medida que el tumor crece o por la localización, tamaño y tipo de tumor. Los tumores cerebrales pueden afectar a personas de todas las edades.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Dolores de cabeza que empeoran al acostarse.
• Convulsiones.
• Pérdida de la memoria, confusión y pérdida de la concentración.
• Cambios de personalidad y comportamiento.
• Vómitos y náuseas.
• Problemas con la visión. Esto incluye visión doble.
• Debilidad en un lado del cuerpo.
• Falta de equilibrio y mareos.
• Pérdida del sentido del olfato y audición.

CAUSAS
Se desconoce la causa exacta. Hay factores genéticos y ambientales envueltos. Algunos tumores comienzan en el cerebro y son llamados primarios. Otros tumores cerebrales son llamados secundarios. Estos se han esparcido de otros canceres en el cuerpo (metastatizado). Incluyen cáncer del seno, de los pulmones, del colon y de la piel (melanoma).

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Se desconoce para la mayoría de los tumores cerebrales.
• Radiación a la cabeza para otros tratamientos de cáncer.
• De rara ocurrencia, hay algunas familias que son más propensas a ciertos tipos de tumores.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No se conocen medidas preventivas específicas.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
El pronóstico depende de varios factores. Estos incluyen el tipo de tumor, su tamaño, localización, dispersión del tumor, otro cáncer en el cuerpo, edad y salud del paciente y la respuesta del paciente al tratamiento.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Efectos secundarios físicos y mentales a largo plazo. Esto puede deberse a los efectos del tumor o al tratamiento.
• El tumor puede recurrir después del tratamiento.
• Muerte.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas y actividades. Una diversidad de exámenes médicos serán hechos para diagnosticar el tumor y determinar si se ha esparcido de o a otras partes en el cuerpo.
• El plan de tratamiento será determinado por el tamaño, localización, tipo y etapa del tumor, y su edad y estado de salud. Debido a que hay más de 120 diferentes tipos de tumores cerebrales, el tratamiento necesita ser específico para cada persona.
• El tratamiento puede incluir cirugía, radiación, quimioterapia (medicamentos anticancerosos) y terapia de fármacos dirigidos (matan células específicas).
• Frecuentemente se necesita cirugía. Esta puede incluir extirpar todo o parte del tumor y los tejidos que lo rodean.
• Puede usarse radiación para ciertas etapas del tumor. Generalmente no se utiliza para niños menores de 3 años.
• La terapia inmunológica usa el sistema inmunológico del cuerpo para combatir el cáncer.
• El tratamiento puede incluir medidas para aliviar los síntomas y hacerle sentir cómodo, en lugar de tratar el tumor.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: American Brain Tumor Association, 2710 River Road, Des Plaines, IL 60018; (800) 886-2282; sitio web: www.abta.org; o National Brain Tumor Foundation, 22 Battery Street, Suite 612, San Francisco, CA 94111; (800) 934-2873; sitio web: www.braintumor.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Su proveedor de atención médica le puede recetar:
– Medicamentos para reducir la hinchazón del tejido cerebral.
– Medicamentos para controlar las convulsiones.
– Calmantes para el dolor.
– Medicamentos para combatir las células cancerosas (quimioterapia).
– Fármacos dirigidos para matar células específicas.

ACTIVIDAD
Permanezca tan activo como sus fuerzas se lo permitan.

DIETA
Ingiera una dieta normal y bien balanceada. Puede que necesite tomar vitaminas y minerales si no está comiendo normalmente.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de un tumor cerebral.
• Síntomas nuevos e inexplicables ocurren durante el tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BREAST ABSCESS

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
A breast abscess is an infected area of breast tissue that becomes filled with pus when the body fights the infection. It can involve the breast tissue, nipple(s), milk glands, and milk ducts. They almost always occur in a breast-feeding woman.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Breast pain.
• An area of the breast is tender, red, or hard.
• Fever and chills.
• Feeling ill.
• Tenderness in the area under the arm.

CAUSES
Bacteria that enter the breast through the nipple. This can happen if a nipple gets dry and cracked from breast-feeding.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Breast infection, such as mastitis.
• Pelvic infection after delivery of a baby.
• Previous breast abscess.
• Diabetes.
• Rheumatoid arthritis.
• Use of steroid drugs.
• Heavy cigarette smoking. This is also a risk factor for women who are not breast-feeding.
• Lumpectomy with radiation.
• Some breast implants.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Clean the nipples and breasts carefully, before and after nursing.
• Lubricate the nipples after nursing. Use vitamin A & D ointment or another topical drug if recommended.
• Avoid clothing that irritates the breasts.
• Don’t allow a nursing infant to chew nipples.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• Usually curable in 8 to 10 days with treatment. Draining the abscess is sometimes needed to speed healing.
• It is rarely required for a patient to stop breast-feeding, even with severe infection. Certain antibiotics and pain relievers will require that breast-feeding be stopped for a short period of time. It will then be necessary to pump the breasts.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
An abnormal opening (fistula) may develop between the breast and the outside of the body.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam of the affected area. This is often all that is needed for diagnosis. Medical tests such as a culture of the pus and ultrasound may be done.
• The abscess may need to be drained. Draining of the abscess may be done with a needle inserted into the abscess or with a small incision. This will reduce pain and help clear up the infection.
• You may or may not be able to keep breast-feeding with the affected breast. Your health care provider will help determine if this is possible. If you can’t breast-feed, use a breast pump to remove milk from the infected breast until you can start nursing again on that side.
• Use a warm, moist compress on the breast to relieve pain, hasten healing, and help the flow of milk.

MEDICATIONS
Drugs for pain or antibiotics for infection may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY
After treatment, resume normal activity as soon as symptoms improve.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of a breast abscess.
• Any of the following occur during treatment:
– Fever.
– Pain becomes more severe.
– Infection seems to be spreading, despite treatment.
– Symptoms don’t improve in 72 hours.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ABSCESO EN EL SENO (Breast Abscess) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Un absceso en el seno es un área infectada de los tejidos del seno que se llena de pus cuando el cuerpo combate la infección. Puede afectar los tejidos del seno, el pezón y las glándulas y conductos mamarios. Casi siempre ocurren en mujeres lactando.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Dolor en el seno.
• Un área del seno presenta hipersensibilidad, enrojecimiento o endurecimiento del seno.
• Fiebre y escalofríos.
• Malestar general.
• Hipersensibilidad en el área debajo del brazo.

CAUSAS
Bacterias que penetran en el cuerpo por el pezón. Esto puede ocurrir si el pezón se reseca y agrieta por dar de mamar.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Infección del seno, tal como mastitis.
• Infección pélvica después del parto.
• Absceso en el seno en el pasado.
• Diabetes.
• Artritis reumatoide.
• Uso de medicamentos esteroides.
• Fumar mucho. Este también es un factor de riesgo para mujeres que no están amamantando.
• Tumorectomía con radiación.
• Algunos implantes de seno.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Antes y después de dar de mamar al bebé, límpiese cuidadosamente los senos y los pezones.
• Después de dar de mamar, lubríquese los pezones. Use una pomada con vitamina A y D u otro medicamento tópico si es recomendado.
• Evite usar ropa que le irrite los senos.
• No permita que el bebé le muerda los pezones.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• Por lo general se cura en 8 a 10 días con tratamiento. Para apresurar la curación, en ocasiones es necesario drenar el absceso.
• Es raro que la paciente tenga que dejar de dar de mamar aún si la infección es grave. Algunos antibióticos y analgésicos requieren dejar de dar de mamar por un periodo corto de tiempo. En estos casos es necesario sacarse la leche con una bomba para los senos.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Una abertura anormal (fístula) puede desarrollarse entre el seno y la parte exterior del cuerpo.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico del área afectada. Esto es generalmente todo lo necesario para el diagnóstico. Se pueden hacer exámenes médicos tales como un cultivo del pus y un ultrasonido.
• El absceso puede necesitar ser drenado. El absceso se puede drenar insertando una aguja en el absceso o con una pequeña abertura. Esto reducirá el dolor y ayudará a disipar la infección.
• Quizás pueda o no pueda seguir dando de mamar con el seno afectado. Su proveedor de atención médica determinará si es posible dar de mamar. Si no puede dar de mamar, use una bomba para el seno para remover la leche del seno infectado hasta que pueda comenzar a dar de mamar nuevamente en ese lado.
• Use compresas de agua tibia en el seno para aliviar el dolor, apresurar la curación y ayudar con el flujo de leche.

MEDICAMENTOS
Se le pueden recetar medicamentos para el dolor o antibióticos para la infección.

ACTIVIDAD
Después del tratamiento, reanude sus actividades normales tan pronto mejoren los síntomas.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de absceso en el seno.
• Durante el tratamiento, ocurre uno o más de los siguientes síntomas:
– Fiebre.
– Dolor se vuelve más intenso.
– Parece que la infección se extendiera a pesar del tratamiento.
– Los síntomas no mejoran dentro de 72 horas.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BREAST CANCER

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Breast cancer is a malignant growth of breast tissue. It is the most common form of cancer in women (after skin cancers). Breast cancer is rare before age 30, and is more common after the age of 50. Men can develop breast cancer also.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• No symptoms in early stages. It may be detected by a mammogram or by feeling a breast lump.
• Swelling or lump in the breast.
• Vague discomfort in the breast without true pain.
• Inversion of the nipple.
• Distorted breast contour.
• Dimpled or pitted skin in the breast.
• Enlarged nodes under the arm (late stages).
• Bloody discharge from the nipple (rare).

CAUSES
The cause is unknown. Genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors probably play a role.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Women and increasing age.
• Older age for having first child; never giving birth.
• Personal or family history of breast cancer (especially in mother, sister, or daughter).
• Changes in genes (BRCA1, BRCA2, and others).
• Certain breast changes.
• Dense breast tissue (as seen on a mammogram).
• Early menstruation and/or late menopause.
• White women more than other racial groups.
• Previous radiation therapy to the chest area.
• Menopausal hormone therapy.
• Overweight or obesity (more so after menopause).
• Being physically inactive.
• Excess alcohol use.
• Women who used DES (diethylstilbestrol) between 1938 and 1971 and their daughters.
• Not having breastfed a child.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• There is no sure way to prevent breast cancer. You can reduce certain risk factors.
• Maintain healthy weight, eat a low-fat diet high in vegetables and fruit, exercise daily, and avoid/limit alcohol.
• Consult your health care provider: about new breast symptoms or breast changes, mammogram screening, medical breast exams, and self breast exams.
• Avoid or limit hormone therapy after menopause.
• Women at high risk may have gene testing, take preventive drugs, or consider preventive surgery.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Outcome depends on many factors for each individual.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Cancer spreads to other body parts or cancer recurs.
• Treatment side effects (during and after treatment).

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a breast exam and ask questions about your symptoms. Different medical tests will be done. The tests first help diagnose the cancer and then determine if it has spread (staging).
• Treatment depends on the cancer type, location, and size; if it has spread; and your health, age, and preferences.
• Treatment may include surgery, drug therapy, and/or radiation therapy. The treatment choices are complex and often confusing. Be sure all options are discussed and that you understand the risks and benefits of each.
• Surgery can remove the lump (lumpectomy) or part or all of the breast (different degrees of mastectomy). Lymph nodes and supporting muscles may be removed also. Breast reconstruction surgery is an option.
• Radiation therapy may be used following surgery.
• Counseling may help you cope with having cancer.
• To learn more: National Cancer Institute, (800) 422-6347; website: www.cancer.gov or American Cancer Society, (800) 227-2345; website: www.cancer.org or Breast Cancer Network of Strength, (800) 221-2141; website: www.networkofstrength.org .

MEDICATIONS
Chemotherapy (anticancer drugs), hormone blockers, or targeted therapy (attacks certain cancer cells) may be prescribed. Preventive drugs may also be prescribed.

ACTIVITY

• Cancer and the treatment side effects (e.g., fatigue) may limit your daily routines, work, and other activities.
• After treatment, daily exercise will help you regain your health. Physical therapy may be recommended.

DIET
Try to eat a healthy diet (appetite loss is common).

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has any breast changes.
• You have questions, new symptoms, or concerns.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

CANCER DEL SENO (Breast Cancer) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
El cáncer del seno (mama) es un crecimiento maligno del tejido del seno. Es la forma más común de cáncer en las mujeres (después del cáncer de la piel). El cáncer del seno es raro antes de los 30 años, y es más común después de los 50 años de edad. Los hombres también pueden desarrollar cáncer de la mama.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• No se presentan síntomas en las etapas tempranas. Puede ser detectado por una mamografía o al tantear un bulto en el seno.
• Hinchazón o un bulto en el seno.
• Malestar vago en el seno sin verdadero dolor.
• Inversión del pezón.
• Contorno del seno distorsionado.
• Hoyuelos o piel picada en el seno.
• Nódulos agrandados bajo el brazo (etapas finales).
• Descarga sanguinolenta del pezón (rara vez).

CAUSAS
Se desconoce la causa. Factores genéticos, hormonales y ambientales probablemente juegan un papel.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Las mujeres y la edad avanzada.
• Haber tenido el primer hijo a una edad avanzada; nunca haber dado a luz.
• Antecedentes personales o familiares de cáncer del seno (especialmente en la madre, la hermana o la hija).
• Cambios en los genes (BRCA1, BRCA2 y otros).
• Ciertos cambios en el seno.
• Tejido denso en el seno (como se ve en una mamografía).
• Comenzar la menstruación a una edad temprana y/o menopausia tardía.
• Mujeres blancas más que otros grupos raciales.
• Radioterapia previa en el área del pecho.
• Terapia hormonal en la menopausia.
• Sobrepeso u obesidad (aún mas después de la menopausia).
• Estar inactivo físicamente.
• El exceso de consumo de alcohol.
• Mujeres que usaron DES (dietilestilbestro) entre 1938 y 1971 y sus hijas.
• No haber amamantado al bebé.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• No hay manera segura de evitar el cáncer del seno. Usted puede reducir algunos factores de riesgo.
• Mantenga un peso saludable, consuma un dieta baja en grasas y rica en verduras y frutas, haga ejercicios todos los días y evite/limite el consumo de alcohol.
• Consulte a su proveedor de salud sobre nuevos síntomas en el seno o cambios en el seno, mamografías, examen clínico de los senos, y autoexamen del seno.
• Evite o limite la terapia hormonal después de la menopausia.
• Las mujeres en alto riesgo se pueden hacer pruebas genéticas, tomar medicamentos preventivos o considerar la cirugía preventiva.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
El resultado depende de muchos factores para cada persona.
COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• El cáncer se propaga a otras partes del cuerpo o reaparece.
• Efectos secundarios del tratamiento (durante y después del tratamiento).

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de salud le hará un examen del seno y le hará preguntas sobre sus síntomas. Se le harán un número de pruebas clínicas. Las pruebas primeramente ayudan a diagnosticar el cáncer y luego a determinar si se ha propagado (clasificación por etapas).
• El tratamiento depende del tipo de cáncer, tamaño y ubicación; si se ha diseminado; así como de su salud, edad y preferencias.
• El tratamiento puede incluir cirugía, terapia de medicamentos y/o radioterapia. Las opciones de tratamiento son complejas y a menudo confusas. Asegúrese de que todas las opciones sean explicadas y de que usted entiende los riesgos y beneficios de cada una.
• La cirugía puede extraer el tumor (lumpectomía) o una parte o todo el seno (grados diferentes de mastectomía). Los ganglios linfáticos y los músculos de soporte también pueden ser extraídos. La reconstrucción quirúrgica del seno es una opción.
• La radioterapia puede ser usada después de la cirugía.
• La terapia le puede ayudar a enfrentar el trauma de tener cáncer.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: National Cancer Institute, (800) 422-6347; sitio web: www.cancer.gov o American Cancer Society (800) 227-2345, sitio web: www.cancer.org o Breast Cancer Network of Strength, (800) 221-2141, sitio web: www.networkofstrength.org .

MEDICAMENTOS
Se le puede prescribir quimioterapia (medicamentos anticancerosos), bloqueadores de hormonas, o terapia dirigida (ataca ciertas células de cáncer). También se le pueden prescribir medicamentos preventivos.

ACTIVIDAD

• El cáncer y los efectos secundarios del tratamiento (p. ej., fatiga) pueden limitar su rutina diaria, su trabajo y otras actividades.
• Después del tratamiento, hacer ejercicios todos los días le puede ayudar a recuperar la salud. Se le puede recomendar terapia física.

DIETA
Trate de consumir una dieta saludable (la pérdida del apetito es común).

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia descubre cambios en el seno.
• Usted tiene preguntas, síntomas nuevos o preocupaciones.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BRONCHIECTASIS

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Bronchiectasis is a lung disease in which the bronchi (airways in the lungs) become damaged and abnormally widened. Recurrent or severe lung infections occur. It may begin in childhood, but no symptoms appear until later in life. It is more common in older women.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Some people may have few or no symptoms.
• Frequent coughing. There may be foul-smelling mucus. The mucus may be green or yellow. Sometimes the mucus is flecked with blood.
• Chest pain and wheezing and shortness of breath.
• Feeling tired and weak.
• Weight loss.

CAUSES
Over years, the walls of the bronchi (airways) become inflamed and damaged. Extra mucus builds up in the widened airways, which leads to infection and further airway damage. The extent of damage will vary and can affect one airway or many. There are a number of known underlying causes that can lead to the airway damage. In some cases, no cause is found.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Certain hereditary disorders (e.g., cystic fibrosis, primary ciliary dyskinesia [more rare], and others).
• Lung infections (e.g., tuberculosis, whooping cough, measles, bronchitis, pneumonia, and others).
• Airway obstruction (e.g., inhaled foreign body, tumor, or airway narrowing).
• Autoimmune disorders (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis).
• Complication of inflammatory bowel disease.
• Broncho-pulmonary aspergillosis.
• Inhaling backed up stomach acid or toxic gases.
• Weak immune system due to illness or drugs.
• Smoking is not a direct cause, but can damage lungs.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• None specific. Avoid risk factors where possible.
• Obtain medical care for lung infections.
• Get childhood immunizations.
• Get vaccines for flu and pneumonia.
• Don’t smoke.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
There is no cure. With treatment, many patients can lead nearly normal lives without major problems. In some cases, it will depend on the underlying cause.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
• Repeated pneumonia or other infections.
• Cor pulmonale (heart disorder due to lung disease).
• Hospital care and breathing support may be needed.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms. Medical tests may include studies of blood or sputum (material coughed up from the lung). Other tests may include a special type of CT, x-ray, bronchoscopy (looking in the airways with a lighted tube), and pulmonary function tests.
• Treatment includes chest physical therapy (CPT) to remove lung secretions and drugs for symptoms and to prevent infections and to treat any underlying disorder.
• You will be instructed on chest physical therapy (called postural drainage) techniques. These help loosen mucus so it can be coughed up. They are done 3 or 4 times a day. There are several devices that can assist you with CPT. You may be taught certain breathing techniques that can also help loosen mucus.
• Quit smoking. Find a way to stop that works for you.
• Oxygen therapy may be needed for severe symptoms.
• Surgery to remove areas of damaged lung tissue may be recommended if other treatments are not effective.
• To learn more: American Lung Association, 61 Broadway, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10006; (800) 586-4872; website: www.lungusa.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Your health care provider may prescribe:
– Antibiotic drugs for infections.
– Inhaled steroids to reduce inflammation.
– Bronchodilators to assist breathing.
– Drugs to loosen or thin the mucus.
– Drugs to treat any underlying disorder.

ACTIVITY
Remain as active as possible. Daily exercise such as walking is recommended. It helps loosen mucus also.

DIET
Eat a healthy diet. Drink plenty of fluids daily.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has signs of bronchiectasis.
• Infection, fever, or new symptoms occur.
• Sputum changes color, is bloody, or thickens.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

BRONQUIECTASIA (Bronchiectasis) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La bronquiectasia es una enfermedad pulmonar en la que los bronquios (vías respiratorias de los pulmones) se dañan y ensanchan anormalmente. Se pueden producir infecciones pulmonares recurrentes o graves. Puede comenzar en la niñez, pero los síntomas no aparecen hasta más tarde en la vida. Es más común en las mujeres mayores.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Algunas personas pueden tener pocos síntomas o ninguno.
• Tos frecuente. Puede haber flema maloliente, verde o amarilla (algunas veces salpicada de sangre).
• Dolor de pecho, respiración sibilante y falta de aliento.
• Sensación de cansancio y debilidad.
• Pérdida de peso.

CAUSAS
Con el paso de los años, las paredes de los bronquios (las vías respiratorias) se inflaman y dañan. La magnitud de los daños varía y puede afectar una o muchas vías respiratorias. Existen un número de causas subyacentes conocidas que pueden conducir al daño de una vía respiratoria. En algunos casos, no se encuentra la causa.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Ciertos trastornos hereditarios (p. ej., fibrosis quística, disquinesia ciliar [menos común]).
• Infecciones pulmonares (p. ej., tuberculosis, tos ferina, sarampión, bronquitis, neumonía y otras).
• Obstrucción de la vías respiratorias (p. ej., inhalar un objeto extraño, un tumor, o estrechamiento de las vías respiratorias).
• Trastornos autoinmunes (p. ej., artritis reumatoide).
• Complicaciones de la enfermedad intestinal inflamatoria.
• Bronquitis crónica.
• Aspergilosis bronco-pulmonar.
• La inhalación de ácido estomacal o ácidos tóxicos acumulados
• Sistema inmunológico débil debido a enfermedades o medicamentos.
• El fumar no es una causa directa, pero puede dañar los pulmones.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• No hay medidas preventivas específicas. Evite los factores de riesgo cuando sea posible:
– Obtenga tratamiento médico para infecciones pulmonares.
– Hágase aplicar las vacunas infantiles
– Hágase aplicar vacunas contra la influenza y la neumonía.
– No fume.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
No hay cura. Con tratamiento, muchos pacientes pueden llevar una vida normal sin mayores impedimentos. En algunos casos, dependerá de la causa subyacente.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica.
• Neumonía repetida u otras infecciones.
• Cor pulmonale (enfermedad cardiaca debido a la enfermedad pulmonar).
• Puede ser necesaria la hospitalización y maquinaria para ayudar la respiración.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir estudios de la sangre o esputo (material botado del pulmón). Otras pruebas pueden incluir un tipo especial de tomografía computarizada, radiografías, broncoscopia (mirar dentro de las vías respiratorias con un tubo alumbrado) y exámenes de la función pulmonar.
• El tratamiento incluye terapia física del pecho (CPT, por sus siglas en inglés) para remover las secreciones de los pulmones, y medicamentos para los síntomas y para prevenir infecciones y el tratamiento de cualquier trastorno subyacente.
• Se le darán instrucciones sobre técnicas para la terapia física del pecho (llamada drenaje postural). Esas técnicas ayudan a aflojar la mucosidad para que pueda ser expectorada. Se hacen 3 ó 4 veces por día. Existen varios dispositivos que pueden ayudarle con la CPT. Se le enseñarán ciertas técnicas de respiración que también pueden ayudar a aflojar la mucosidad.
• Deje de fumar. Encuentre una manera que funcione para usted.
• La terapia de oxígeno puede ser necesaria para los síntomas graves.
• Puede recomendarse una cirugía para remover las áreas de tejidos pulmonares dañadas si otros tratamientos no son efectivos.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: American Lung Association, 61 Broadway, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10006, (800) 586-4872; sitio web: www.lungusa.org .

MEDICAMENTOS
Su proveedor de atención médica puede recetarle:
• Medicamentos antibióticos para las infecciones.
• Esteroides inhalados para reducir la inflamación.
• Bronquio-dilatadores para ayudar con la respiración.
• Medicamentos para aflojar o diluir la mucosidad.
• Medicamentos para tratar los trastornos subyacentes.

ACTIVIDAD
Siga tan activo como le sea posible. Se recomiendan ejercicios diarios, como ser caminar. También ayuda a aflojar la mucosidad.

DIETA
Ingiera una dieta saludable. Beba mucho líquido diariamente.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia presentan signos de bronquiectasia.
• Se presenta una infección, fiebre o nuevos síntomas.
• El esputo cambia de color, contiene sangre o está más espeso.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BRONCHIOLITIS

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Bronchiolitis is an inflammation and infection of the smallest airways (bronchioles) of the respiratory tract. These airways normally carry air from the large bronchial tubes to tiny air sacs in the lungs. Bronchiolitis mainly affects infants and young children. Boys are affected more often than girls.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Often there is a mild common cold and cough before symptoms of bronchiolitis appear.
• Sudden trouble with breathing and wheezing.
• Rapid, shallow breathing.
• Chest and stomach are pulled in and out in seesaw movements with breathing.
• Grunting sounds while breathing in infants.
• Fever may occur or dehydration may develop.
• Blue skin or nails in severe cases.

CAUSES
Usually a viral infection. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common. Other viral infections may sometimes be the cause. Germs are spread by sneezing, coughing, or by contact of hands to nose, mouth, or eyes. Symptoms start 2 to 5 days after the exposure.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Young children (usually under age 2).
• Winter and early spring seasons.
• Daycare centers.
• Crowded living conditions.
• Exposure to cigarette smoke.
• Children who were born premature, had low birth weight, were born with health problems (neurologic, heart, or lung), or have developed a lung disorder.
• Bottle fed baby slightly more so than breastfed baby.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• No specific preventive measures.
• Wash hands carefully to prevent spread of any germs.
• Avoid exposure to infected persons.
• Don’t allow any smoking around a baby or child.
• Children at risk for complications of RSV infections may be given therapy to prevent the infection.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Mild cases may last for one or two days. Other cases may take 5 to 12 days for recovery. A few children with other health problems may be at risk for complications.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Respiratory failure.
• Chronic lung disease.
• Heart disorders.
• Bronchiolitis obliterans (collapse of part of the lung).
• Other infections.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about the symptoms and activities. Medical tests are usually not needed, but may be done to confirm the diagnosis.
• There is no specific treatment for this disorder. Mild cases may be treated at home. Extra rest and drinking plenty of fluids is usually all that is needed.
• Use an ultrasonic, cool-mist humidifier if recommended by your health care provider. Clean the humidifier daily.
• A blocked-up nose may be suctioned with a rubber suction device.
• If the symptoms are more severe, hospital care may be required. Oxygen may be provided through a facemask. Some patients require breathing support with a ventilator (a device to help the lungs). Treatment to help remove lung secretions may be needed.

MEDICATIONS

• Hospital care may include drugs to relieve breathing problems, treat infections, and prevent complications.
• Acetaminophen may be used for fever.

ACTIVITY
Rest until symptoms have improved for 48 hours. Then gradually return to normal activities.

DIET
Offer a child clear fluids often. These include water, clear juice, clear broth, or others. Infants should continue to nurse or drink formula.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has bronchiolitis symptoms.
• Cold symptoms become worse.
• Temperature rises to 101°F (38.3°C) or higher.
• Breathing becomes more difficult.
• A cough begins that produces colored mucus.
• The skin, lips, or nails turn bluish in color.
• The child becomes drowsy and lacks energy.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

BRONQUIOLITIS (Bronchiolitis) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La bronquiolitis es una inflamación e infección de las vías respiratorias más pequeñas (bronquiolos) del tracto respiratorio. Estas vías respiratorias normalmente transportan aire desde los tubos bronquiales de mayor tamaño a los sacos de aire pequeños en los pulmones. La bronquiolitis afecta principalmente a los infantes y niños pequeños. Afecta con más frecuencia a los varones que a las niñas.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• A menudo hay un resfriado común leve y tos antes de que los síntomas de bronquiolitis aparezcan.
• Dificultad súbita para respirar y respiración sibilante.
• Respiración superficial y rápida.
• Retracciones (movimiento de subida y bajada) del pecho y abdomen al respirar.
• Sonidos roncos al respirar en los infantes.
• Fiebre puede ocurrir o se puede desarrollar deshidratación.
• Piel o uñas azuladas en casos graves.

CAUSAS
Infección viral, usualmente. El virus sincitial respiratorio (RSV, por sus siglas en inglés) es la infección más común. Otras infecciones virales pueden ser la causa en algunas ocasiones. Los gérmenes son esparcidos al estornudar, toser o por contacto de las manos con la nariz, la boca o los ojos. Los síntomas comienzan de 2 a 5 días después de la exposición.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Niños pequeños (generalmente menores de 2 años).
• Invierno y temprano en la primavera.
• Centros de cuidado diurno.
• Vivir en condiciones de hacinamiento.
• Exposición al humo del cigarrillo.
• Niños que nacen prematuros, de bajo peso al nacimiento o nacen con problemas de salud (neurológicos, corazón o pulmón) o han desarrollado trastornos pulmonares.
• Bebes alimentados con biberón un poco más que los que están alimentados con leche materna.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• No hay medidas preventivas específicas.
• Lávese las manos cuidadosamente para prevenir la propagación de los gérmenes.
• Evite el contacto con las personas infectadas.
• No permita que fumen cerca del bebé o niño.
• A los niños en riesgo para complicaciones con infecciones por el virus sincitial respiratorio se les pueden dar terapia para prevenir infecciones.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
En los casos leves puede durar uno o dos días. Otros casos pueden tardar de 5 a 12 días para recuperarse. Algunos niños que tienen otros problemas de salud tienen un mayor riesgo de complicaciones.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Fallo respiratorio.
• Enfermedad crónica del pulmón.
• Trastornos cardiacos.
• Colapso de una parte del pulmón.
• Otras infecciones.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de los síntomas y actividades. Generalmente no se necesitan exámenes médicos, pero pueden ser realizados para confirmar el diagnóstico.
• No hay un tratamiento específico para este trastorno. Los casos leves pueden tratarse en el hogar. Descanso adicional y beber suficientes líquidos es generalmente todo lo que se necesita.
• Si su proveedor de atención médica lo recomienda, use un humidificador ultrasónico de vaporización fría. Limpie el humidificador diariamente.
• Una nariz bloqueada puede ser succionada con un aparato de succión de goma.
• Si los síntomas son más graves, se puede necesitar hospitalización. Se puede administrar oxígeno a través de una máscara. Algunos pacientes requieren ayuda para respirar con un ventilador (un aparato que ayuda a los pulmones). Se puede necesitar tratamiento para remover las secreciones pulmonares.

MEDICAMENTOS

• La hospitalización puede incluir medicamentos para ayudar a aliviar los problemas respiratorios, tratar las infecciones y para prevenir las complicaciones.
• Se puede usar paracetamol para la fiebre.

ACTIVIDAD
Descanse hasta que los síntomas hayan mejorado por 48 horas. Luego puede reanudar las actividades normales.

DIETA
Ofrézcale frecuentemente líquidos claros al niño. éstos incluyen agua, jugos claros, caldo claro u otros. Los bebes deben continuar siendo amamantados o tomando la fórmula.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de bronquiolitis.
• Los síntomas del resfriado empeoran.
• La temperatura se eleva a 101°F (38.3°C) o más.
• La respiración se hace cada vez más difícil.
• Comienza una tos con expectoración de color.
• La piel, los labios o las uñas se tornan azul.
• El niño se vuelve letárgico y carente de energía.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BRONCHITIS, ACUTE

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Acute bronchitis is an inflammation of the mucous lining of the bronchi (main air passages) to the lungs. Symptoms of acute bronchitis may start suddenly and last just a few days. It is a common disorder affecting all age groups. Chronic bronchitis is a different disorder that persists over a long period of time.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• A common cold or sore throat may occur prior to bronchitis.
• Cough that produces little or no mucus at first. Later, mucus may be produced.
• Low fever (usually less than 101°F/38.3°C).
• Burning feeling in chest. Feeling of pressure behind the breastbone.
• Wheezing. There may also be trouble breathing.
• Feeling tired.

CAUSES

• Viral infection usually. Most cases begin with a cold virus in the nose and throat. The virus then spreads to the lungs. A bacterial infection may also cause bronchitis. Infection causes the mucous membranes to become inflamed and produce thick, sticky mucus. This narrows the airways and causes the symptoms.
• Irritative bronchitis is caused by allergies, chemicals, and other irritants in the environment.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Chronic lung disease or chronic sinusitis.
• Smoking or secondhand smoke.
• Poor nutrition.
• Allergies.
• Areas with polluted air.
• Elderly and very young age groups.
• Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Avoid close contact with people who have a cold or the flu. Wash hands often to avoid germs.
• Don’t smoke.
• If you work around chemicals, dust, or other lung irritants, wear a special facemask.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Usually curable in 1 week. Cases with complications are usually curable in 2 weeks, with drug therapy. In some people, the cough may continue for several weeks, even after the infection is gone.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Pneumonia.
• Chronic bronchitis.
• Bronchiectasis (bronchial tubes become blocked).
• Pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs).

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and use a stethoscope to listen to your lungs. Medical tests are usually not needed. A chest x-ray may be done if symptoms are more severe.
• Treatment is directed toward relieving the symptoms. Get extra rest and increase fluid intake.
• If you are a smoker, don’t smoke during your illness. Smoking makes it harder to recover. Nonsmokers should avoid secondhand smoke.
• Increase air moisture. Take warm showers. Use a cool-mist humidifier if recommended by your health care provider. Clean the humidifier daily.
• To learn more: American Lung Association, 61 Broadway, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10006, (800) 586-4872; website: www.lungusa.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Use acetaminophen for fever and minor pain.
• Nonprescription cough suppressants (to ease coughing) or expectorants (to thin mucus) may be used to relieve symptoms. The mucus should be coughed up, so use cough suppressants with caution.
• Antibiotics may be prescribed for bacterial infection. They will not help a viral infection.
• Drugs may be prescribed for specific symptoms.

ACTIVITY
Get extra rest until symptoms improve. Then return to normal activities, as you feel better.

DIET
No special diet. Drink at least 8 to 10 glasses of fluid each day. This helps makes mucus easier to cough up.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of acute bronchitis.
• You develop a high fever and chills. You have chest pain. You cough up mucus that is thick, colored, or has blood in it. You feel short of breath, even when resting.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

BRONQUITIS AGUDA (Bronchitis, Acute) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La bronquitis aguda es una inflamación del revestimiento mucoso de los bronquios (pasajes de aire principales) a los pulmones. Los síntomas de bronquitis aguda pueden comenzar súbitamente y duran solo unos pocos días. Es un trastorno común que afecta a personas de todas las edades. La bronquitis crónica es un trastorno diferente que persiste por un periodo largo de tiempo.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Un resfriado común o dolor de garganta puede ocurrir antes de la bronquitis.
• Tos sin o con muy poca expectoración inicialmente, pero más adelante puede producirse mayor expectoración.
• Fiebre baja (usualmente menos de 101°F/38.3°C).
• Sensación de ardor en el pecho. Sensación de opresión detrás del esternón.
• Respiración sibilante. También pueden haber molestias al respirar.
• Sensación de cansancio.

CAUSAS

• Generalmente una infección viral. La mayoría de los casos comienzan con un virus del resfriado en la nariz y garganta. El virus luego se propaga a los pulmones. Una infección bacteriana también puede causar bronquitis. La infección causa que las membranas mucosas se inflamen y produzcan una mucosidad espesa y pegajosa. Esto estrecha las vías respiratorias y causa los síntomas.
• La bronquitis irritativa es causada por alergias, sustancias químicas y otros irritantes en el ambiente.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Enfermedad crónica de los pulmones o sinusitis crónica.
• Fumar o con el humo de los fumadores.
• Mala nutrición.
• Alergias.
• Áreas con aire contaminado.
• Ancianos y personas muy jóvenes.
• Reflujo gastroesofágico (o GERD, por sus siglas en inglés).

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Evite el contacto cercano con personas que tienen resfriados o la influenza (gripe). Lávese las manos frecuentemente para evitar los gérmenes.
• No fume.
• Si trabaja alrededor de sustancias químicas, polvo u otros irritantes pulmonares, use una mascarilla protectora adecuada.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Generalmente curable en 1 semana. Si hay complicaciones, generalmente se cura en 2 semanas con medicamentos. En algunas personas, la tos puede continuar por varias semanas, incluso después que la infección ha desaparecido.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Neumonía.
• Bronquitis crónica.
• Bronquiectasia (los tubos de los bronquios se obstruyen).
• Pleuresía (infamación del revestimiento pulmonar).

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y usará un estetoscopio para escuchar los pulmones. Generalmente no se necesitan exámenes médicos. Se puede hacer una radiografía del pecho si los síntomas son más severos.
• El tratamiento está dirigido a aliviar los síntomas. Obtenga descanso adicional y aumente el consumo de líquidos.
• Si fuma, no lo haga mientras esté enfermo. El fumar demora la recuperación y aumenta la posibilidad de complicaciones. Los no fumadores deben evitar el humo de los fumadores.
• Aumente la humedad del aire. Dese duchas tibias. Use un humidificador de vaporización fría si su proveedor de atención médica se lo recomienda. Limpie el humidificador diariamente.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: American Lung Association, 61 Broadway, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10006, (800) 586-4872; sitio web: www.lungusa.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Paracetamol para la fiebre y dolores leves.
• Puede usar jarabes para la tos (para disminuir la tos) o expectorantes (para adelgazar las secreciones) de venta sin receta para aliviar los síntomas. La flema debe ser tosida, así que use los jarabes para la tos (supresores de la tos) con cuidado.
• Se pueden recetar antibióticos para la infección bacteriana. Estos no ayudarán si hay una infección viral.
• Se pueden recetar medicamentos para síntomas específicos.

ACTIVIDAD
Obtenga descanso adicional hasta que los síntomas mejoren. Luego regrese a las actividades normales, a medida que se sienta mejor.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial. Beba por lo menos de 8 a 10 vasos de líquido por día para ayudar a diluir las secreciones mucosas y poder expectorarlas más fácilmente.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de bronquitis aguda.
• Tiene fiebre alta y escalofríos. Tiene dolor de pecho. Tose flema espesa, con color o estrías de sangre. Siente falta de aire, aunque esté en reposo.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BRONCHITIS, CHRONIC

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Chronic bronchitis is an inflammation of the mucous lining of the bronchi (main air passages) to the lungs. It often occurs along with emphysema (damaged air sacs in the lungs). Chronic bronchitis usually affects adults over age 45 and women more than men.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
Symptoms don’t start suddenly. They develop over time. They include: presence of a mucus-producing cough most days of the month, 3 months of the year, for 2 consecutive years.

CAUSES
Repeated irritation or infection in the bronchial tubes. The tubes begin to thicken and become more narrow. They begin to lose their elasticity. The main cause is smoking.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Smoking.
• History of lung disorders.
• Family history of lung disease.
• Exposure to air pollutants or cigarette smoke.
• Work that involves exposure to high levels of dust and irritating fumes.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Don’t smoke. This is the best prevention.
• Avoid fumes in the environment.
• Get prompt medical care for lung infections.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
There is no cure for this disorder. Treatment can help relieve the symptoms and slow the progress of the disease. Smokers must stop smoking.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Pneumonia, emphysema, abnormal heart rhythms, or cor pulmonale (heart disorder).
• Respiratory failure (lungs fail to function properly).

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms, smoking habits, and exposure to pollutants or irritants. Many lung and heart disorders cause symptoms identical to those of chronic bronchitis. Medical tests will be used to make a diagnosis.
• Treatment can help relieve symptoms and help prevent complications. A treatment plan will be developed based on your individual needs.
• Stop smoking. Find a way to quit that works for you.
• Avoid areas with air pollution, dust, or fumes. Consider changing jobs if you need to.
• Install air-conditioning with a filter and humidity control in your home.
• Avoid shouting, laughing loudly, and crying if these make you cough.
• Get a pneumococcal vaccine and annual flu vaccine.
• Your health care provider can teach you exercises to help improve your breathing.
• Supplemental oxygen may be required.
• Lung reduction surgery or lung transplantation may be recommended for advanced cases.
• To learn more: American Lung Association, 61 Broadway, 6th Floor, New York, NY 10006, (800) 586-4872; website: www.lungusa.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Don’t take drugs to lessen your cough. They can make this condition worse.
• Antibiotics for infection may be prescribed.
• Oral or inhaled bronchodilator drugs may be prescribed to relax and open the airways in the lungs.
• Oral or inhaled steroids may be prescribed to reduce inflammation.
• Drugs to thin the mucous may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY

• Regular exercise is important. Long periods of being inactive can add to your disability.
• Avoid sudden temperature changes. Avoid cold, wet weather.
• Be careful when exercising or working. Work at a pace that does not make you cough.

DIET
No special diet. Drink plenty of fluids. This can help thin the mucus produced by your lungs.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of chronic bronchitis.
• You have a fever or vomiting.
• Mucus gets thicker or has blood in it.
• Your chest pain gets worse.
• You feel short of breath even when you are resting or not coughing.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

BRONQUITIS CRONICA (Bronchitis, Chronic) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La bronquitis crónica es una inflamación del revestimiento mucoso de los bronquios (pasajes de aire principales). Frecuentemente ocurre junto con enfisema (daño de los sacos de aire en los pulmones). Generalmente la bronquitis crónica afecta a adultos mayores de 45 años y a más mujeres que hombres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES
Los síntomas no comienzan súbitamente. Se desarrollan con el pasar del tiempo. Estos incluyen presencia de tos con flema la mayoría de los días del mes, 3 meses del año por 2 años consecutivos.

CAUSAS
Irritación o infección recurrente en los tubos bronquiales. Los tubos se vuelven más gruesos y más estrechos. Estos comienzan a perder elasticidad. La causa principal es fumar.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Fumar.
• Antecedentes de trastornos pulmonares.
• Antecedentes familiares de enfermedad pulmonar.
• Exposición a contaminantes en el aire o a humo de cigarrillo.
• Ocupación que envuelve la exposición a niveles altos de polvo y gases irritantes.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• No fume. Esta es la mejor prevención.
• Evite los gases en el ambiente.
• Obtenga cuidado médico inmediato para las infecciones pulmonares.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
No hay cura para este trastorno. El tratamiento puede ayudar a aliviar los síntomas y retrasar el progreso de la enfermedad. Los fumadores deben dejar de fumar.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Neumonía, enfisema, ritmo cardiaco anormal, o cor pulmonale (trastorno cardiaco).
• Insuficiencia respiratoria (los pulmones no funcionan correctamente).

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de los síntomas, los hábitos de fumar y la exposición a contaminantes e irritantes. Muchos trastornos pulmonares y cardiacos causan síntomas idénticos a los de la bronquitis crónica. Se realizarán exámenes médicos para hacer el diagnóstico.
• El tratamiento puede ayudar a aliviar los síntomas y ayudar a prevenir las complicaciones. Un plan de tratamiento será desarrollado basado en sus necesidades individuales.
• Deje de fumar. Encuentre una manera que funcione para usted.
• Evite las áreas con contaminantes en el aire, polvo y gases irritantes. Considere el cambiar de trabajo si es necesario.
• Instale un aire acondicionado con un filtro y control de humedad en su hogar.
• Evite gritar, reírse fuerte y llorar si esto le hace toser.
• Hágase vacunar anualmente contra el neumococo e influenza.
• Su proveedor de atención médica le enseñará ejercicios para ayudar a mejorar su respiración.
• Se puede necesitar oxígeno suplementario.
• Se puede recomendar cirugía para reducir el pulmón o un trasplante de pulmón para casos avanzados.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: American Lung Association, 61 Broadway, 6th Floor, New Cork, NY 10006, (800) 586-4872; sitio web: www.lungusa.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• No tome medicamentos para disminuir la tos. Estos pueden empeorar la enfermedad.
• Se pueden recetar antibióticos para combatir la infección.
• Se pueden recetar broncodilatadores orales o inhalados para relajar y abrir las vías respiratorias en los pulmones.
• Se pueden recetar esteroides orales o inhalados para reducir la inflamación.
• Se pueden recetar medicamentos para diluir las mucosidades.

ACTIVIDAD

• El ejercicio regular es importante. Los periodos prolongados de inactividad pueden aumentar su incapacidad.
• Evite los cambios súbitos de temperatura. Evite el clima frío y húmedo.
• Sea cuidadoso cuando haga ejercicio o trabaje. Trabaje a un ritmo que no le haga toser.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial. Beba líquidos en abundancia. Esto ayuda a diluir las secreciones pulmonares.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de bronquitis crónica.
• Tiene fiebre o vómitos.
• La flema se vuelve espesa o tiene sangre.
• El dolor en el pecho empeora.
• Siente que le falta el aire incluso cuando está descansado o sin toser.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BRUCELLOSIS (Undulant Fever; Bang’s Disease)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Brucellosis is an infection passed to humans from infected cows, pigs, sheep, or goats. It affects the bone marrow, lymph glands, liver, and spleen. It is more common in men between ages 20 and 60. The infection may be acute (short lasting) or chronic (persisting over months or years). It is a rare disease in the United States.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Sweating, chills, and fever (may come and go).
• Tiredness.
• Upset stomach.
• Tenderness along the spine.
• Headache.
• Muscle and joint aches.
• Constipation.
• Weight loss.
• Depression.
• In later stages of the infection, mental problems and seizures may occur.

CAUSES
Infection from germs of the bacterial genus Brucella . The germs can be passed to humans by eating or drinking something that is contaminated. This most often involves milk and milk products such as cheese. Infection can also occur from breathing in germs in the air. Germs can enter the body through skin wounds. After a person is exposed, symptoms may develop in 1 to 8 weeks.
• Person-to-person spread is extremely rare. An infected mother may pass it through breast-feeding to an infant. Sexual transmission has been reported.
• Dogs can get infected with the germs, but it is unlikely to be passed to humans. However, persons with a weak immune system should not handle infected dogs.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Persons who work with animals. This includes farmers, ranchers, meat processors, and veterinarians.
• Travel to some foreign countries.
• Biological warfare.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Don’t drink milk from any source that has not been pasteurized.
• Protect yourself when working around animals. Use safety protection (gloves and mask) as needed.
• Farm animals should be immunized.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Can usually be cured in 3 to 4 weeks with treatment. Some muscle aches may continue for a period of time.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Endocarditis (heart inflammation).
• Complications can affect almost any body system.
• Brucellosis may recur.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms and activities. Be sure to discuss any contact with animals you have had in the last few months. Medical tests may include studies of blood, urine, and spinal fluid. X-ray, CT, heart tests, and others may be done depending on the symptoms.
• Treatment usually consists of drugs for infection and getting extra rest. If symptoms are more severe, hospital care may be needed.
• It usually is not necessary to keep the ill person away from others.
• Avoid contact with animals that may be the source of the infection.
• Family members who may have been exposed to the same infected food products should see their health care provider.

MEDICATIONS

• Antibiotic drugs will be prescribed for the infection. You usually need to take them for several weeks.
• Drugs to reduce swelling in severe cases and for relief of muscle pain may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY
Get extra rest until fever and other symptoms improve. Return to your normal activities slowly.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of brucellosis.
• Fever or other symptoms return after treatment.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

BRUCELOSIS (Fiebre Malta; Fiebre Ondulante; Fiebre Mediterranea) (Brucellosis [Undulant Fever; Bang’s Disease]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La brucelosis es una infección que se transmite a los seres humanos por contacto con vacas, cerdos, ovejas o cabras infectadas. Afecta la médula ósea, los ganglios linfáticos, el hígado y el bazo. Es más común en hombres entre los 20 y 60 años. La enfermedad puede ser aguda (corta duración) o crónica (persistente por meses o años). Es una enfermedad poco común en los Estados Unidos.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Sudores, escalofríos y fiebre (intermitente).
• Cansancio.
• Malestar estomacal.
• Hipersensibilidad a lo largo de la columna vertebral.
• Dolor de cabeza.
• Dolor en los músculos y articulaciones.
• Estreñimiento.
• Pérdida de peso.
• Depresión
• En las etapas avanzadas de la infección, pueden presentarse problemas mentales y convulsiones.

CAUSAS

• Infección con microorganismos de la bacteria del género Brucella. Los microorganismos pueden ser transmitidos a los seres humanos al ingerir alimentos o líquidos infectados. Generalmente, esto involucra leche y productos lácteos, como queso. La infección también puede ocurrir por respirar los microorganismos en el aire. Después que una persona ha estado expuesta, los síntomas se pueden desarrollar en 1 a 8 semanas.
• El contagio entre dos personas es extremadamente poco común. Una madre que tiene la infección puede transmitirla a su bebé al amamantarlo. Se han reportado casos de transmisión sexual.
• Los perros pueden infectarse con los microorganismos, pero es improbable que puedan transmitir la infección a los seres humanos. Sin embargo, las personas con sistemas inmunológicos debilitados no deben tocar a perros infectados.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Personas que trabajan con animales. Esto incluye los granjeros, ganaderos, carniceros y veterinarios.
• Viajar a países extranjeros.
• Guerra biológica.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• No beba leche de ninguna fuente que no haya sido pasteurizada.
• Protéjase cuando trabaje alrededor de animales. Use el equipo protector (guantes y máscara) que necesite.
• Los animales en la granja deben ser inmunizados.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Generalmente curable en 3 a 4 semanas con tratamiento. Los dolores musculares pueden continuar por un periodo corto de tiempo.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Endocarditis (inflamación del corazón).
• Las complicaciones pueden afectar casi a cualquier otro sistema del cuerpo.
• La brucelosis puede recurrir.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas y actividades. Asegúrese de discutir cualquier contacto que haya tenido con animales en los últimos meses. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir análisis de sangre, orina y líquido cefalorraquídeo. Se pueden hacer radiografías, tomografías computarizadas, exámenes cardiacos y otros, dependiendo de los síntomas.
• Generalmente el tratamiento consiste en medicamentos para la infección y en obtener descanso adicional. Si los síntomas son más graves, se puede necesitar hospitalización.
• Generalmente no es necesario aislar a la persona enferma.
• Evite el contacto con los animales que puedan ser la fuente de la infección.
• Los miembros de la familia que hayan estado expuestos a los mismos alimentos deben ver al proveedor de atención médica.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se recetarán antibióticos para combatir la infección. Generalmente necesitará tomarlos por varias semanas.
• Se pueden recetar medicamentos para reducir la hinchazón en casos graves y para aliviar el dolor muscular.

ACTIVIDAD
Obtenga descanso adicional hasta que la fiebre y los otros síntomas mejoren. Reanude las actividades normales lentamente.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de brucelosis.
• Después del tratamiento vuelve la fiebre o alguno de los otros síntomas.
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BUERGER’S DISEASE (Thromboangiitis Obliterans)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Buerger’s disease is a blockage of small and medium arteries due to inflammation of blood vessels. The symptoms come on gradually over a period of time. The disease is most common in men between ages 20 and 45 who are heavy cigarette smokers. However, it is now being diagnosed more in women.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Numbness and tingling in the legs, feet, arms, and fingers.
• Pain in the feet and legs while walking or during exercise. This pain occurs less often in the hands and fingers. Pain comes from not having enough blood flow to these areas of the body. Pain becomes persistent as disease progresses.
• Raynaud’s phenomenon. A condition where the hands, fingers, feet, and toes turn white, blue, or red when exposed to cold.
• Painful sores (ulcers) and gangrene (dead tissue) on the toes and fingertips.

CAUSES
Unknown. The disease is probably triggered by smoking combined with an immune reaction in the body. Most patients are heavy smokers, but some are moderate smokers, and some use smokeless tobacco. Genetic factors are thought to be involved also. Israeli Jews of Ashkenazi have higher risk, as do people in the Middle East, Far East, and Asia.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Smoking or using smokeless tobacco.
• Family history of Buerger’s disease.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
There are no specific preventive measures, except never to smoke.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
This condition is currently considered incurable. Stopping smoking is the only effective treatment to stop the progress of the disease.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Blood clots in the legs.
• Finger and toe ulcers, gangrene, and amputation.
• Life expectancy is shorter.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms and smoking history. This is often enough to make the diagnosis. Medical tests may be done to rule out other disorders and check for complications.
• There is no effective drug or specific treatment for the disorder.
• Get treatment for any infection or injury that occurs.
• The disease will get worse if smoking continues, so stop smoking. Join a program to help you stop.
• Avoid exposure to the cold if possible. Cold causes blood vessels to constrict. This deprives your body of a normal blood supply. If you are going out in cold weather, wear warm footwear and gloves.
• Clip nails carefully to avoid injuring the skin.
• Wear shoes that fit well. Wear cotton or wool socks.
• Insert soft pads in your shoes to protect your feet.
• Don’t go barefoot outdoors.
• If gangrene develops, amputation of the affected limb, toes, or fingers is likely.
• Counseling may be recommended to help with lifestyle changes required to cope with the disease.

MEDICATIONS
Drugs that open the blood vessels may be prescribed. These drugs will not help if you continue smoking.

ACTIVITY
Stay as active as you can. Begin an exercise program to become as physically fit as possible.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of Buerger’s disease.
• You have pain that cannot be controlled.
• Sores develop on your fingers or toes.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ENFERMEDAD DE BUERGER (Tromboangitis Obliterante) (Buerger’s Disease [Thromboangiitis Obliterans]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La enfermedad de Buerger es una obstrucción de las arterias pequeñas y medianas debido a una inflamación de los vasos sanguíneos. Los síntomas empiezan gradualmente durante un periodo de tiempo. La enfermedad es más común en los hombres entre los 20 y 45 años que fuman mucho. Sin embargo, está siendo diagnosticada más en mujeres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Adormecimiento y hormigueo en las piernas, los pies, los brazos y los dedos.
• Dolor en los pies y las piernas mientras camina o hace ejercicio. Este dolor es menos frecuente en las manos y los dedos. El dolor ocurre por no tener suficiente circulación sanguínea a estas áreas del cuerpo. El dolor se vuelve persistente a medida que la enfermedad progresa.
• Fenómeno de Raynaud. Un trastorno en el cual las manos, los dedos, los pies y los dedos se tornan blancos, azules o rojos cuando están expuestos al frío.
• Úlceras dolorosas y gangrena (tejido muerto) en los dedos de los pies y las yemas de los dedos.

CAUSAS
Desconocidas. La enfermedad es probablemente provocada por la combinación de fumar con una reacción inmunológica del cuerpo. La mayoría de los pacientes fuman mucho, pero también hay fumadores moderados y algunos consumidores de tabaco para mascar. Se cree que también hay factores genéticos involucrados. Los judíos de ascendencia asquenazí tienen un mayor riesgo, así como las personas en el Oriente Medio (Próximo) y el Extremo Oriente.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Fumar o consumir tabaco para mascar.
• Antecedentes familiares de la enfermedad de Buerger.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No hay medidas preventivas específicas excepto no fumar nunca.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Actualmente este trastorno se considera incurable. Parar de fumar es el único tratamiento efectivo para parar el progreso de la enfermedad.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Coágulos de sangre en las piernas.
• Úlceras en los dedos de las manos y de los pies, gangrena y amputación.
• Expectativa de vida más corta.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas y su historial de fumador. Generalmente esto es suficiente para hacer el diagnóstico. Se pueden hacer exámenes médicos para descartar otros trastornos y verificar complicaciones.
• No hay medicamentos efectivos o tratamiento específico para este trastorno.
• Obtenga tratamiento para cualquier infección o lesión que ocurra.
• La enfermedad empeorará si continúa fumando, así que deje de fumar. Únase a un programa que lo ayude a dejar de fumar.
• Evite exponerse al frío. El frío causa que los vasos sanguíneos se estrechen. Esto priva al cuerpo del suministro normal de sangre. Si va a salir al frío, use calzado abrigado y guantes.
• Córtese las uñas con cuidado para evitar lastimarse la piel.
• Use zapatos que le acomoden bien. Use calcetines de algodón o lana.
• Ponga almohadillas suaves en los zapatos para protegerse los pies.
• No salga descalzo.
• Si aparece gangrena, puede ser necesario amputar el miembro, los dedos de los pies o de las manos.
• Se puede necesitar terapia psicológica para ayudarle con los cambios en el estilo de vida necesarios para enfrentar la enfermedad.

MEDICAMENTOS
Le pueden recetar medicamentos para dilatar los vasos sanguíneos. Estos medicamentos no le ayudarán si continúa fumando.

ACTIVIDAD
Permanezca tan activo como pueda. Comience un programa de ejercicios para mantenerse en el mejor estado físico posible.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de la enfermedad de Buerger.
• Siente un dolor incontrolable.
• Le salen úlceras en los dedos de las manos o de los pies.
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BULIMIA

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Bulimia is an eating disorder. A person with bulimia eats larger amounts of food (called binging) than most people would eat in a short time. Then they purge (such as with self-induced vomiting or other methods) to rid themselves of the food and avoid weight gain. They may also use nonpurging methods such as fasting or exercising too much. There can be numerous symptoms including behavioral, physical, and emotional effects. Bulimia affects both sexes (women much more than men). It often starts in the teen years.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Episodes of binge eating. Eating in secret or in hiding.
• Denial of hunger.
• Self-induced vomiting that occurs after eating.
• Frequent trips to the bathroom after meals.
• Frequent use of laxatives, water pills, or diet pills.
• Excess exercising.
• Consistently aspires to achieve or overachieve.
• Obsessed with body image, appearance, and weight.
• A “chipmunk” like appearance. It may include swelling of the cheeks, face, or salivary glands.
• Lack of menstrual periods.
• Depression, anxiety, or mood swings. Feeling out of control. Low self-esteem or poor self-identity.
• Heartburn, bloating, indigestion, and constipation.
• Dental problems and sore throat.
• Weakness and tiredness. Bloodshot eyes. Dry skin.

CAUSES
There is no single known cause. Factors that play a role include emotional and psychological factors, genetics, and cultural pressures (e.g., feel pressured to be very thin).

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Young females, compulsive and perfectionistic type persons, dieters, and those overly concerned about weight.
• Stress, including lifestyle changes, such as moving, starting at a new school or job, or relationship breakup.
• Personality disorders.
• Sports, work, or artistic activities. These can include athletes, actors, television personalities, dancers, models, gymnasts, runners, boxers, and wrestlers.
• Homosexual males.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
No specific preventive measures. Early treatment may help keep it from progressing.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Outcome varies. If patients desire to change, they can often be helped with therapy. For some patients, it may continue long-term. Others may just have episodes of bulimia that occur with life events and crisis.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
Many mental and physical health problems can develop. They can be serious and life-threatening.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider can often diagnose bulimia with a physical exam and by asking questions about your symptoms, eating habits, and weight concerns. There is no one test to diagnose bulimia. Medical tests may be done to check for possible underlying disorder, physical problems, or complications.
• Denial of the severity or even the existence of a problem is common in patients. Most patients resist treatment and behavior change at first. Some want a quick and easy solution that is not feasible.
• Treatment goals include: healthy eating patterns, maintaining normal weight, and preventing a relapse.
• Treatment may include counseling for the patient and the family, nutritional help, and drug therapy if needed.
• Care in a hospital or special facility may be required.
• A dental exam is usually recommended.
• Counseling can change how you think about food and about yourself and how you handle feelings such as anger, anxiety, and feeling hopeless or helpless.
• Support groups may help some patients.
• To learn more: National Eating Disorders Association, 603 Stewart St., Suite 803, Seattle WA 98101; (800) 931-2237; website: www.nationaleatingdisorders.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Drugs for depression or anxiety may be prescribed.
• Vitamin and mineral supplements may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY
May be limited at first. Then the person should exercise for enjoyment and fitness and not to lose weight.

DIET
A dietitian can help you with healthy meal planning.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You have symptoms of bulimia or you suspect your child has bulimia.
• Treatment does not improve bulimia behavior.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

BULIMIA (Bulimia) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La bulimia es un trastorno alimenticio. Una persona con bulimia come cantidades más grandes de alimentos (llamados atracones) que lo que la mayoría de las personas comerían en un corto tiempo. Luego se purgan (ya sea con vómitos autoinducidos o por otros métodos) para deshacerse del alimento y evitar aumentar de peso. También pueden usar métodos no purgativos como el ayuno o ejercicio excesivo. Pueden haber numerosos síntomas, incluyendo efectos físicos y emocionales. La bulimia afecta a los dos sexos (a las mujeres mucho más que a los hombres). A menudo comienza en la adolescencia.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Episodios de atracones. Comer en secreto o a escondidas.
• Negar que tiene hambre.
• Vómitos autoinducidos que ocurren después de haber comido.
• Viajes frecuentes al baño después de las comidas.
• Uso frecuente de laxantes, diuréticos o píldoras para adelgazar.
• Ejercicio excesivo.
• Aspira constantemente a alcanzar o exceder metas ambiciosas.
• Obsesionado con la imagen corporal, la apariencia física y el peso.
• Tiene la apariencia de una "ardilla". Eso puede incluir hinchazón de las mejillas, la cara o las glándulas salivales.
• Falta de periodos menstruales.
• Depresión, ansiedad o cambios de humor. Sentirse fuera de control. Baja autoestima o imagen propia pobre.
• Acidez, hinchazón, indigestión y estreñimiento.
• Problemas dentales y dolor de garganta.
• Debilidad y cansancio. Ojos enrojecidos. Piel seca.

CAUSAS
No existe una sola causa conocida. Los factores en juego incluyen factores emocionales y psicológicos, genéticos y presiones culturales (p.ej., sentirse presionado a ser muy delgado).

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Mujeres jóvenes, personas de tipo compulsivo y perfeccionista, personas en dieta y aquellos que están demasiado preocupados por su peso.
• Estrés, incluyendo cambios de estilo de vida, como una mudanza, empezar en una nueva escuela o trabajo nuevo, o el rompimiento de una relación sentimental.
• Trastornos de la personalidad.
• Actividades deportivas, del trabajo o artísticas. Ellas pueden incluir atletas, actores, personalidades de la televisión, bailarines, modelos, gimnastas, corredores de carreras, boxeadores y luchadores.
• Hombres homosexuales.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No existen medidas preventivas específicas. El tratamiento temprano puede ayudar a evitar su avance.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Los resultados varían. Si los pacientes desean cambiar, a menudo se les puede ayudar con terapia. Para algunos pacientes, eso puede continuar a largo plazo. Otros pueden solo tener episodios de bulimia que ocurren con acontecimientos y crisis de la vida.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Se pueden desarrollar muchos problemas de salud mental y física. Estos pueden ser graves y potencialmente mortales.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de salud con frecuencia puede diagnosticar la bulimia con un examen físico y haciendo preguntas sobre sus síntomas, hábitos alimenticios y preocupaciones sobre su peso. No existe ninguna prueba para diagnosticar la bulimia. Se le pueden hacer exámenes clínicos para determinar si hay trastornos subyacentes, problemas físicos o complicaciones.
• La negación de la gravedad y aun la existencia del problema es común en los pacientes. Muchos de los pacientes en un principio resisten el tratamiento y cambios de comportamiento. Muchos de ellos desean una solución rápida y fácil lo que no es factible.
• Los objetivos del tratamiento incluyen: establecer patrones alimenticios saludables, mantener un peso normal y prevenir una recaída.
• Si es necesario, el tratamiento puede incluir terapia para el paciente y su familia, ayuda nutricional y terapia de medicamentos.
• Se puede requerir atención médica en un hospital o centro especial.
• Generalmente se recomienda un examen dental.
• La terapia puede cambiar su forma de pensar sobre los alimentos y sobre sí mismo y cómo manejar sus sentimientos de cólera, ansiedad y sensación de desesperanza o desamparo.
• Los grupos de apoyo pueden ayudar a algunos pacientes.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: National Eating Disorders Association, 603 Stewart St., Suite 803, Seattle WA 98101; (800) 931-2237; sitio web: www.nationaleatingdisorders.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se le pueden prescribir medicamentos para la depresión o ansiedad.
• Se le pueden prescribir suplementos vitamínicos y minerales.

ACTIVIDAD
Al principio puede ser limitada. Más adelante, la persona puede hacer ejercicios para disfrutarlos y para su condición física, pero no para perder peso.

DIETA
Un nutricionista le puede ayudar con la planificación de comidas saludables.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted tiene síntomas de bulimia o usted sospecha que su hijo tiene bulimia.
• El tratamiento no mejora el comportamiento bulímico.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BUNION (Hallux Valgus)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
A bunion is a bony swelling or bump that occurs along the side of the big toe joint. Bunions may start in the teenage years, but usually occur in the 20 to 30 age group. Three times as many women as men have bunions.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• A big toe that points in, toward the other toes. This is called hallux valgus.
• Thickened skin over an enlarged, bony bump at the base of the big toe.
• Fluid may build up under the thickened skin.
• Foot pain and stiffness.
• The symptoms progress slowly over a period of years.

CAUSES
The big toe has been forced into an incorrect position. This causes the joint to stick out. The big toe may overlap one or more of the other toes.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Family history of foot problems (inherited weakness in the toe joints).
• Flat feet.
• Arthritis.
• Shoes that have high heels and narrow toes that push the toes together.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Exercise daily to keep muscles of the feet and legs in good condition.
• Wear shoes that have wide toes and fit well. Don’t wear high heels or shoes without room for toes in their normal position.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
A bunion is permanent unless surgery is performed to remove it. Self-care can help improve the symptoms.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Infection of the bunion, especially in persons with diabetes.
• Inflammation and arthritis in other joints caused by difficulty in walking. Arthritis can result from abnormal stress on the foot, hip, and spine.
• Bunion may grow back after surgery.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider can diagnose a bunion by its appearance. An x-ray of the toe joint may be done.
• Treatment usually involves self-care steps and surgery, if needed.
• Wear comfortable shoes that fit well.
• If there is swelling, redness, and pain, keep pressure off the affected toe.
• Before bedtime, separate the first toe from the others with a foam-rubber pad.
• Wear a thick, ring-shaped pad around and over the bunion. Use arch supports to relieve pressure on the bunion. These are available in drugstores or shoe-repair shops.
• Custom-made orthotics (shoe inserts) may be prescribed.
• Surgery (bunionectomy) may be recommended when bunion makes walking painful. The bunion is removed and the toe may be straightened. Specific instructions will be provided for self-care after surgery.

MEDICATIONS
Use nonprescription drugs such as aspirin or ibuprofen for pain, swelling, and soreness.

ACTIVITY
If you have surgery, resume your normal activities slowly after surgery. Recovery may take 2 months or more.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has a bunion that is interfering with normal activities.
• You develop signs of infection after treatment or surgery. Signs of infection include fever, tenderness, or pain.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

JUANETE (Hallux Abductus Valgus) (Bunion [Hallux-Valgus]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Un juanete es una protuberancia huesuda que ocurre en el borde exterior de la articulación en la base del dedo gordo del pie. Los juanetes pueden comenzar en la adolescencia, pero generalmente ocurren entre los 20 y 30 años. La frecuencia de juanetes en las mujeres es tres veces aquella de los hombres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Un dedo gordo que apunta hacia los otros dedos. Esto es llamado hallux abductus valgus.
• Engrosamiento de la piel sobre la protuberancia huesuda agrandada en la base del dedo gordo.
• Acumulación de líquido debajo del engrosamiento de la piel.
• Dolor y rigidez en el pie.
• Los síntomas progresan lentamente con el pasar de los años.

CAUSAS
El dedo gordo ha sido forzado a una posición incorrecta. Esto causa que la articulación sobresalga. El dedo gordo puede traslapar sobre uno o más de los otros dedos.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Antecedentes familiares de problemas en los pies (debilidad hereditaria en las articulaciones de los dedos de los pies).
• Pie plano.
• Artritis.
• Zapatos estrechos de tacón alto que comprimen los dedos.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Haga ejercicios diariamente para mantener los músculos de los pies y de las piernas en buenas condiciones.
• Use zapatos de punta ancha que calcen bien. No use tacones altos ni zapatos sin espacio suficiente para mantener los dedos en su posición normal.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Un juanete es permanente a menos que se opere para removerlo. El autocuidado puede ayudar a mejorar los síntomas.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Infección del juanete, especialmente en personas con diabetes.
• Inflamación y artritis en otras articulaciones a causa de la dificultad al caminar. Se puede desarrollar artritis debido a la presión anormal en el pie, la cadera y la columna.
• El juanete puede crecer nuevamente después de la cirugía.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le puede diagnosticar el juanete por su apariencia. Se puede hacer una radiografía de la articulación del dedo.
• El tratamiento generalmente involucra medidas de autocuidado y cirugía si es necesario.
• Use zapatos cómodos que calcen bien.
• Si hay hinchazón, enrojecimiento y dolor, no aplique presión en el dedo afectado.
• Antes de acostarse a dormir, separe el primer dedo de los otros con una almohadilla de espuma de caucho.
• Use una almohadilla gruesa, en forma de anillo, sobre el juanete y alrededor de éste. Use soportes para el arco para aliviar la presión en el juanete. éstos se consiguen en las farmacias o zapaterías.
• Se puede recetar una órtesis a la medida (para insertar en el zapato).
• Se puede recomendar cirugía (bunionectomía) cuando el juanete hace doloroso el caminar. El juanete es extirpado y el dedo puede ser enderezado. Instrucciones específicas serán provistas para autocuidado después de la cirugía.

MEDICAMENTOS
Use medicamentos de venta sin receta tales como aspirina o ibuprofeno para el dolor, la hinchazón y el enrojecimiento.

ACTIVIDAD
Si ha tenido cirugía, reanude las actividades normales lentamente después de la cirugía. La recuperación puede tomar 2 meses o más.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene un juanete que está interfiriendo con las actividades normales.
• Aparecen signos de infección después del tratamiento o de la cirugía. Los signos de infección incluyen fiebre, hipersensibilidad o dolor.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BURNS

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
A burn is an injury to the skin from contact with heat, radiation, electricity, sunlight, or chemicals. Sometimes internal organs may also be injured. The risk of damage is greatest with infants and young children.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Thin or superficial burns (1st-degree burns) are limited to the upper skin layer. They cause redness, tenderness, pain, and swelling.
• Partial thickness burns (2nd-degree burns) affect deeper skin layers. Symptoms are more severe and usually include blisters.
• Full thickness burns (3rd-degree burns) involve all skin layers. Skin is white and appears cooked. There may be no pain in the initial stages.

CAUSES

• Rise in skin temperature from heat sources such as fire, steam, or electricity. Open flame and hot liquid are the most common causes.
• Tissue injury caused by chemicals or radiation, including sunlight.
• Lightning strikes can cause internal burns with few external signs.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Stress, carelessness, smoking in bed, or excess alcohol use. All of these make accidents more likely.
• Jobs involving exposure to heat or radiation. This includes firefighting, police work, or factory work.
• Faulty electrical wiring.
• Hot water heaters set too high.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Fireproof your home. Install smoke alarms. Plan emergency exits and have regular fire drills.
• Wear protective gear around heat or radiation.
• Don’t touch uncovered electric wires.
• Teach children safety rules for matches, fires, electrical outlets, cords, and stoves.
• Use extension cords only when necessary.
• If you have small children, put safety covers on outlets. Get rid of frayed cords.
• Buy flame-resistant sleepwear for children.
• Use sunscreen. Find safe shelter if in lightning storm.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Most persons recover if the burns affect less than 50% of the body’s surface. With less severe burns, skin usually heals in 1 to 3 weeks.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Infection. Shock, due to loss of fluids from the body.
• Severe burns can cause serious health problems that can lead to death.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• For severe burns call 911 for emergency help.
• See your health care provider for burns that are less severe. The burn area will be examined and treatment given depending on the type of burn and size of the area affected. Special dressings and skin-care products may be prescribed.
• For minor burns treated at home:
– Place the burned area in cold water, hold it under running water, or use wet compresses on it for at least 5 minutes (longer for chemical burns). This will reduce pain and swelling. Don’t use ice on a burn.
– Use an aloe vera cream or antibiotic ointment (no butter). Wrap the area loosely with sterile gauze dressing to protect the area. Change the dressing each day.
– Don’t break blisters. This can cause infection.
– Keep the burned area higher than the rest of the body, if possible.
• Emergency care and a hospital stay are usually needed for severe burns. Complications, such as lung damage from smoke, may need treatment. There are special burn centers for the most serious cases. Surgery may be needed to graft skin, and rehabilitation may be needed after burns start healing.

MEDICATIONS

• You may take acetaminophen or ibuprofen for pain.
• Hospital care may include drugs to treat the burns, for pain, and to prevent infection. A tetanus booster is needed if it is not up to date.

ACTIVITY
Resume normal activity as soon as possible. This will help speed recovery.

DIET
No special diet for minor burns. Severe burns may require use of a feeding tube until symptoms improve.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You have a burn that does not heal in 6 days.
• Child under age 2 has a burn, even if it seems minor.
• You develop chills, fever, or increased pain, redness, swelling, or pus in the burn area.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

QUEMADURAS (Burns) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Una quemadura es una lesión en la piel por contacto con calor, radiación, electricidad, rayos solares o productos químicos. Algunas veces los órganos internos también pueden ser lesionados. El riesgo es mayor en bebés y niños pequeños.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Las quemaduras finas o superficiales (quemaduras de primer grado) se limitan a la capa superior de la piel. Producen enrojecimiento, hipersensibilidad, dolor e hinchazón.
• Las quemaduras de espesor parcial (quemaduras de segundo grado) afectan capas más profundas de la piel. Los síntomas son más graves y por lo general incluyen ampollas.
• Las quemaduras gruesas (quemaduras de tercer grado) afectan todas las capas de la piel. La piel está de un color blancuzco, tomando una apariencia de carne cocida. Es posible que en las primeras etapas no se sienta dolor.

CAUSAS

• Elevación de la temperatura de la piel a causa de una fuente de calor como fuego, vapor o electricidad. Las llamas y los líquidos calientes son la causa más común.
• Lesión de los tejidos causada por productos químicos o radiación, incluyendo los rayos solares.
• El impacto de un rayo puede causar quemaduras internas con pocos signos externos.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Estrés, descuido, fumar en la cama o consumo excesivo de bebidas al cohólicas. Todos estos aumentan la posibilidad de que ocurran accidentes.
• Trabajos que involucran la exposición al calor o a radiación, tales como bomberos, policías y trabajadores en fábricas.
• Cables eléctricos defectuosos.
• Tanques de agua caliente cuya temperatura ha sido fijada demasiado alta.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Tome medidas preventivas para proteger su hogar contra incendios. Instale detectores de humo. Prepare un plan de salidas de emergencia y practíquelo con regularidad.
• Use ropa protectora cuando esté cerca de calor o radiación.
• No toque cables eléctricos expuestos.
• Enseñe a los niños reglas de seguridad con respecto a cerillas, fuegos, tomacorrientes, cables eléctricos y estufas.
• Use cables de extensión solamente si es necesario.
• Si tiene niños pequeños, coloque cubiertas protectoras en los tomacorrientes. Deshágase de los cables eléctricos que estén en mal estado.
• Compre ropa de dormir a prueba de fuego para los niños.
• Use protector solar. Encuentre un refugio seguro si está en una tormenta eléctrica.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• La mayoría de las personas se recuperan si la extensión de las quemaduras se limita a menos que el 50% de la superficie del cuerpo.
• Con quemaduras menos graves, la piel por lo general se sana en 1 a 3 semanas.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Infección. Shock debido a la pérdida de líquidos del cuerpo.
• Las quemaduras graves pueden causar problemas serios que pueden conducir a la muerte.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Para quemaduras graves llame al 911 (emergencia). para primeros auxilios.
• Vea a su proveedor de atención médica para quemaduras que son menos graves. El área de la quemadura será examinada y le darán tratamiento de acuerdo al tipo de quemadura y tamaño del área afectada. Le pueden recetar vendajes especiales y productos para el cuidado de la piel.
• Para quemaduras leves tratadas en el hogar:
– Coloque el área quemada en agua fría, debajo de agua corriendo o use compresas húmedas por lo menos por 5 minutos (más tiempo para quemaduras producidas por productos químicos). Esto reducirá el dolor y la hinchazón. No utilice hielo en una quemadura.
– Utilice aloe vera o una pomada antibiótica (no mantequilla). Envuelva sin apretar mucho el área con un vendaje de gasa esterilizada para proteger el área. Cambie el vendaje cada día.
– No se apriete las ampollas. Esto puede causar infección.
– Si es posible, mantenga el área quemada de modo que esté más elevada que el resto del cuerpo.
• Cuidado de emergencia y hospitalización son generalmente necesarios para quemaduras graves. Complicaciones, como daño a los pulmones por el humo, pueden necesitar tratamiento. Existen centros especiales para quemaduras para casos más serios. Puede ser necesario cirugía para injertar piel y rehabilitación después que las quemaduras comiencen a curarse.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Puede tomar paracetamol o ibuprofeno para el dolor.
• El cuidado en el hospital puede incluir medicamentos para tratar las quemaduras, para el dolor y prevenir una infección. Una inyección de refuerzo para tétano es necesaria si no está al día.

ACTIVIDAD
Reanude las actividades normales tan pronto como sea posible. Esto ayudará a agilizar la recuperación.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial para quemaduras leves. Las quemaduras graves pueden requerir el uso de un tubo o sonda de alimentación hasta que los síntomas mejoren.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Tiene una quemadura que no sana en 6 días.
• Un niño menor de 2 años tiene una quemadura, incluso si es leve.
• Tiene escalofríos, fiebre; aumento del dolor, enrojecimiento, hinchazón o pus en el área de la quemadura.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

BURSITIS

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Bursitis is the inflammation (swelling and pain) of a bursa. A bursa is a soft, fluid-filled sac that serves as a cushion between tendons and bones. There are over 150 bursa in the human body. Areas usually affected are near the shoulders, elbows, knees, pelvis, hips, or heels (Achilles tendons).

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Pain, swelling, tenderness, and limited movement in the affected joint. Pain may spread into nearby areas of the body.
• A feeling of warmth over the affected joint.

CAUSES
Inflammation can be caused by overuse, injury, disease, or infection. Sometimes no cause is found.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Injury to a joint.
• Overuse of a joint.
• Exercising more than usual.
• Calcium deposits in shoulder tendons.
• Infection.
• Arthritis.
• Gout.
• People who suddenly increase their activity levels (“weekend warriors”).
• Not stretching properly or over-stretching.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Avoid injuries when possible. Don’t overuse muscles. Wear protective gear for contact sports.
• Warm-up before exercise. Cool-down after exercise.
• Stay physically fit.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
This is a common, but not serious problem. Symptoms usually improve in 7 to 14 days with treatment.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Prolonged healing time if the activity that led to the problem is resumed too soon.
• Chronic bursitis may occur due to repeated injuries or recurrent attacks of bursitis.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Self-care may be all that is needed.
– Use RICE therapy (rest, ice, compression, and elevation). Rest the affected joint. Use an ice pack to massage the area several times a day. Use compression by wearing an elastic bandage. Elevate the affected joint by resting it on a pillow.
– You may use heat, in addition to ice, if it feels better. Apply a hot, wet towel or use a heating pad. A deep-heating ointment may be helpful.
• See your health care provider if self-care does not help or symptoms are severe. Bursitis can be diagnosed by a physical exam. Medical tests are usually not done.
• Your health care provider may sometimes drain fluid from the joint with a needle. Surgery is rarely needed.
• Physical therapy may be recommended to maintain flexibility, mobility, and strength of the joint.

MEDICATIONS

• Use nonprescription acetaminophen or ibuprofen for mild pain.
• Your health care provider may prescribe:
– Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or creams.
– Antibiotics (if the bursa is infected).
– Prescription pain relievers for severe pain.
– Injection with a local anesthetic mixed with a corticosteroid drug.

ACTIVITY

• Rest the affected joint as much as possible. It may help to wear a sling or a brace, or to use crutches until the pain becomes easier to bear. Begin normal, slow joint movement as soon as pain permits.
• Follow directions for any recommended home exercise routines.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of bursitis that is severe or self-care methods do not help.
• New symptoms develop after treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

BURSITIS (Bursitis) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Bursitis es la inflamación (hinchazón y dolor) de una bursa, o bolsa sinovial. Una bursa es un saco suave, lleno de líquido que sirve como cojín entre los tendones y los huesos. Hay más de 150 bursas en el cuerpo humano. Las áreas comúnmente afectadas están cerca de los hombros, los codos, las rodillas, la pelvis, las caderas o los talones (tendones de Aquiles).

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Dolor, hinchazón, hipersensibilidad y movimiento limitado en la articulación afectada. El dolor puede extenderse a las áreas cercanas del cuerpo.
• Sensación de calor sobre la articulación afectada.

CAUSAS
La inflamación puede ser causada por el uso excesivo, lesión, enfermedad o infección. A veces no se encuentra causa alguna.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Lesión de una articulación.
• Uso excesivo de una articulación.
• Ejercitarse más de lo usual.
• Depósitos de calcio en los tendones del hombro.
• Infección.
• Artritis.
• Gota.
• Personas que aumentan su nivel de actividad súbitamente ("guerreros del fin de semana").
• No estirarse apropiadamente o estirarse de más.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Evite las lesiones cuando sea posible. No use los músculos excesivamente. Use equipo protector para los deportes de contacto.
• Haga ejercicios de calentamiento y enfriamiento respectivamente antes y después de hacer ejercicio.
• Manténgase en buen estado físico.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Este es un problema común, pero no es serio. Los síntomas generalmente mejoran en 7 a 14 días con tratamiento.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Tiempo prolongado de curación si se reanuda la actividad que llevó al problema demasiado pronto.
• Puede sufrir bursitis crónica debido a lesiones repetidas o ataques recurrentes de bursitis.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Puede que el autocuidado sea lo único que necesite
– Use terapia de descanso, hielo, compresión y elevación (o RICE, por sus siglas en inglés). Descanse la articulación afectada. Use bolsas de hielo para masajear el área varias veces al día. Aplique compresión usando un vendaje elástico. Eleve la articulación afectada descansándola en una almohada.
– Puede usar calor, en adición al hielo, si se siente mejor. Aplique una toalla mojada y caliente o use una almohadilla eléctrica. Un ungüento de calor también puede ser útil.
• Vea a su proveedor de atención médica si el autocuidado no ayuda o los síntomas son severos. La bursitis puede diagnosticarse mediante un examen físico. Generalmente no se hacen exámenes médicos.
• Puede que su proveedor de atención médica drene líquido de la articulación con una aguja. Raramente se requiere cirugía.
• Se puede recomendar terapia física para mantener la flexibilidad, movilidad y fuerza de la articulación.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Use paracetamol o ibuprofeno de venta sin receta para dolores leves.
• Su proveedor de atención médica puede recetarle:
– Cremas o medicamentos antiinflamatorios no esteroides.
– Antibióticos (si la bursa está infectada).
– Analgésicos con receta para el dolor severo.
– Inyección de un anestésico local mezclado con un medicamento corticosteroide (o corticoide).

ACTIVIDAD

• Descanse la articulación afectada tanto como sea posible. Puede ayudarle el usar un cabestrillo o usar muletas hasta que el dolor sea más fácil de soportar. Comience el movimiento normal, pero lento de la articulación tan pronto como el dolor se lo permita.
• Siga las direcciones recomendadas para cualquier rutina de ejercicios casera.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de bursitis que son severos o los métodos de autocuidado no funcionan.
• Aparecen síntomas nuevos después del tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página
C

CALCIUM IMBALANCE

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Calcium is a mineral that helps regulate the heartbeat, transmit nerve impulses, and contract muscles. It also helps form bone and teeth. Too much calcium (hypercalcemia) or too little calcium (hypocalcemia) can cause serious medical problems. The problems can sometimes be life-threatening. Most calcium is stored in the bones, but it is also found in the blood and cells.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Too little calcium:
– Muscle spasms, twitching, or cramping.
– Arms, hands, legs, and feet may tingle or feel numb.
– Seizures (convulsion).
– Heartbeat is irregular.
– High blood pressure.
• Too much calcium (often produces no symptoms):
– Feeling tired and sluggish.
– Loss of appetite.
– Vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration, and thirst.
– Heartbeat is irregular.
– Low blood pressure.
– Depression; mental changes (confused or delirious).
– Seizures or coma (in severe cases).

CAUSES

• Too little calcium:
– Parathyroid glands that are underactive. This can be caused by disease or damage to the parathyroid.
– Not getting enough calcium and vitamin D.
– The body doesn’t absorb calcium from the stomach.
– Severe burns or infections.
– Problems with the pancreas.
– Kidney failure.
– Low levels of certain minerals in your blood.
• Too much calcium:
– Parathyroid gland that is overactive.
– Broken bones and long periods of bed rest.
– Cancer of the bone marrow.
– Tumors that destroy bone.
– Certain drugs (e.g., thiazide diuretics).

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Too little calcium:
– Use of certain drugs such as diuretics.
– Injury, cancer, or surgery of the thyroid or parathyroid glands.
– Excess alcohol use.
– Poor nutrition.
• Too much calcium:
– Diet that is too high in dairy products or excess use of antacids that contain calcium.
– Kidney disease.
– Being inactive or confined to bed for long periods.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Eat a normal, well-balanced diet.
• Don’t drink alcohol, or limit it to 1 to 2 drinks a day.
• Don’t use nonprescription antacids on a regular basis.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Most cases can be cured in 1 week with treatment.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Heart attack.
• Bones may become weak and break easily.
• Kidney stones from high calcium.
• Ulcer from high calcium.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider may do a physical exam. Medical tests can include blood studies of calcium levels, x-rays of bones, and echocardiogram (a heart study).
• Treatment involves correcting the problem or treating the disorder causing the imbalance. This may be all that is required. In other cases, treatment may be needed to remove excess calcium or replace low calcium levels.

MEDICATIONS

• Drugs may be prescribed to raise or lower your calcium levels, depending on the need. Drugs may be given by mouth or through a needle placed in your vein (IV).
• Other drugs may be prescribed to treat a disorder that is the cause of the calcium imbalance.

ACTIVITY
After treatment, return to your normal activities slowly as symptoms improve.

DIET

• For mild, low calcium level, calcium supplements and vitamin D may be recommended. Get more protein, milk, and milk products in your diet.
• For a mild, high-calcium level, consume fewer dairy products and antacids that contain calcium.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of calcium imbalance.
• Symptoms get worse or they don’t improve with treatment.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

DESEQUILIBRIO DE CALCIO (Calcium Imbalance) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
El envenenamiento con monóxido de carbono ocurre después de aspirar monóxido de carbono (CO), un gas venenoso que es incoloro e inodoro. En los Estados Unidos, es la forma más común de envenenamiento accidental. El CO se produce al quemar combustibles como la gasolina, madera, petróleo o carbón. Las fuentes incluyen los gases de escape de los vehículos o botes motorizados, calentadores, calderas, parrillas de carbón, aparatos que queman gas, o herramientas, equipos a gas propano y humo de un fuego o incendios.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Deficiencia de calcio:
– Espasmos musculares, tic nervioso o calambres.
– Entumecimiento y hormigueo en los brazos, las piernas, las manos y los pies.
– Convulsiones.
– Latidos cardiacos irregulares.
– Presión arterial elevada.
• Exceso de calcio (frecuentemente no produce síntomas):
– Cansancio y letargo.
– Pérdida de apetito.
– Vómito, diarrea, deshidratación y sed.
– Latidos cardiacos irregulares.
– Presión arterial baja.
– Depresión, cambios mentales (confusión o delirio).
– Convulsiones o estado de coma (en casos graves).

CAUSAS

• Deficiencia de calcio:
– Glándulas paratiroides poco activas. Esto puede ser causado por una enfermedad o una lesión a las paratiroides.
– Consumo inadecuado de calcio y vitamina D.
– El cuerpo no absorbe calcio del estómago.
– Quemaduras o infecciones graves.
– Problemas con el páncreas.
– Insuficiencia renal.
– Niveles bajos de ciertos minerales en la sangre.
• Exceso de calcio:
– Glándulas paratiroides hiperactivas.
– Fracturas múltiples y permanencia prolongada en cama.
– Cáncer de la medula ósea.
– Tumores que destruyen los huesos.
– Ciertos medicamentos (p. ej., diuréticos con tiazida).

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Deficiencia de calcio:
– Uso de ciertos medicamentos tales como los diuréticos.
– Lesión, cáncer o cirugía en la glándula tiroides o en las paratiroides.
– Consumo excesivo de alcohol.
– Mala nutrición.
• Exceso de calcio:
– Dieta con un consumo excesivo de productos lácteos o de antiácidos que contienen calcio.
– Enfermedad renal.
– Inactividad o permanencia prolongada en cama.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Ingiera una dieta normal y bien balanceada.
• No consuma alcohol, o limite el consumo a de 1 a 2 tragos al día.
• No use regularmente antiácidos de venta sin receta.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
La mayoría de los casos se curan en una semana con tratamiento.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Ataque cardiaco.
• Fracturas de huesos débiles.
• Cálculos renales por nivel elevado de calcio.
• Úlcera por nivel elevado de calcio.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica puede hacerle un examen físico. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir análisis de sangre de los niveles de calcio, radiografías de los huesos y un ecocardiograma (un estudio del corazón).
• El tratamiento incluye corregir el problema o tratar el trastorno que está causando el desequilibrio. Esto puede que sea todo lo que se necesite. En otros casos, puede que necesite remover el exceso de calcio o reemplazar los niveles bajos de calcio.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se pueden recetar medicamentos para elevar o bajar los niveles de calcio, dependiendo de lo que se necesite. Los medicamentos pueden administrarse oralmente o a través de una aguja colocada en la vena (intravenosamente).
• Se pueden recetar medicamentos para tratar el trastorno que es la causa del desequilibrio de calcio.

ACTIVIDAD
Después del tratamiento, reanude lentamente las actividades normales a medida que los síntomas mejoren.

DIETA

• Para una deficiencia moderada de calcio, pueden recomendarse suplementos de calcio y vitamina D. Aumente el consumo de proteínas, leche y productos lácteos.
• Para un exceso moderado de calcio, limite el consumo de productos lácteos y de antiácidos que contengan calcio.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de desequilibrio de calcio.
• Los síntomas empeoran o no mejoran con el tratamiento.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

CANDIDIASIS OF SKIN

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Candidiasis is a fungal (or yeast) infection in skin folds, or in areas of skin that touch other areas of skin. It can affect the underarm area, spaces between fingers and toes, inner thighs, under the breasts, and over the base of the spine. It may affect the skin of the scrotum, vagina, and vaginal lips.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Plaques (patches or flat areas) on skin.
• Bright-red patches with poorly defined borders. They are often 2.5 to 5 inches across, but may be larger.
• Patches may weep or ooze.
• Skin appears moist and crusted.
• Itching is usually severe.
• Smaller patches may surround larger patches. They sometimes form small white blisters with pus inside.

CAUSES
It is caused by Candida , a type of fungus. Candida fungi actually live on the skin and normally cause no harm. If skin is damaged or there is excess moisture and warmth, the fungus germs can grow and cause infection. The infection can be spread from one person to another by direct contact, and less often, by sexual contact. Germs are also spread by sharing damp towels or washcloths.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Use of oral antibiotics.
• Use of any type of steroids.
• Diabetes.
• The elderly or infants (it causes diaper rash).
• Pregnant women or use of birth control pills.
• Using plastic pants in infants or pantyhose in women.
• Obesity.
• Existing skin infection or skin disorder.
• Weak immune system because of disease or drugs.
• Work that involves the skin being wet continuously.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Take antibiotics only when prescribed.
• Keep skin cool and dry.
• Avoid risk factors where possible.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• Usually curable in 2 weeks with treatment. Without treatment, healing may be slow.
• It is common for these fungal infections to recur.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Nail infection, causing them to thicken or crumble.
• Bacterial infection, in addition to the fungal infection.
• Infection spreading to the whole body (in those with weak immune systems).

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider can diagnose the infection by an exam of the affected skin area. Medical tests may include a study of a skin scraping or pus.
• Treatment involves drugs and self-care measures. Any skin condition that may have led to the candidiasis infection should be treated also.
• Keep skin cool and dry. Expose affected skin areas to air as much as possible.
• Wear loose cotton clothing. Avoid synthetic or wool fabrics. Change socks often if feet are affected.
• To avoid spreading germs, don’t go barefoot on wet floors where other people may walk. Don’t share towels. Clean the bathtub or shower after you use it.
• Protect skin from injury, but don’t bandage the affected skin.

MEDICATIONS
Antifungal drugs to be applied to the skin are usually prescribed. Gently massage a small amount into the affected area as directed. Use only enough to cover the affected area. Larger amounts don’t help. In more severe cases, an antifungal drug taken by mouth may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY
No limits, except to avoid heat and sweating.

DIET
No special diet. Eating yogurt or taking probiotic supplements may or may not help prevent yeast infections (research is unclear).

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of candidiasis.
• The following occur during treatment:
– Infection continues to spread despite treatment.
– Signs of secondary bacterial infection develop. Signs include pain, tenderness, redness, warmth, and oozing.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

CANDIDIASIS DE LA PIEL (Candidiasis of Skin) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La candidiasis es una infección fúngica (o por levaduras) en los pliegues de la piel o en las áreas de la piel que tocan otras áreas de la piel. Esta puede afectar el área debajo del brazo, los espacios entre los dedos de las manos y de los pies, el lado interior de los muslos, debajo de los senos y sobre la base de la columna vertebral. Puede afectar la piel del escroto, la vagina y los labios vaginales.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Placas (parches o áreas lisas) en la piel.
• Parches de color rojo brillante sin bordes bien definidos. A menudo miden de 2.5 a 5 pulgadas de diámetro pero pueden ser más grandes.
• Algunos parches exudan o supuran.
• La piel parece húmeda y con costras.
• Por lo regular la picazón es severa.
• Parches más pequeños pueden rodean los parches más grandes. Algunas veces forman pequeñas ampollas blancas con pus adentro.

CAUSAS
La infección en la piel es causada por la levadura del hongo Candida . El hongo Candida en realidad vive en la piel y generalmente no causa ningún daño. Si la piel es lesionada o si hay exceso de humedad y calor, los gérmenes del hongo pueden crecer y causar una infección. Esta infección puede ser propagada de una persona a otra por contacto directo y menos frecuentemente, por contacto sexual. Los gérmenes pueden también propagarse por compartir toallas húmedas.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Uso de antibióticos orales.
• Uso de cualquier tipo de esteroides.
• Diabetes.
• Personas mayores o infantes (causa erupción por el pañal).
• Mujeres embarazadas o usando pastillas anticonceptivas.
• Uso de pantalones plásticos en infantes o pantimedias en las mujeres.
• Obesidad.
• Infección existente de la piel o trastorno de la piel.
• Sistema inmunológico débil debido a una enfermedad o medicamentos.
• Trabajos que involucran que la piel esté húmeda continuamente.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Tome antibióticos únicamente cuando se los receten.
• Mantenga la piel fresca y seca.
• Evite los factores de riesgo cuando sea posible.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• Generalmente se cura en 2 semanas con tratamiento. Sin tratamiento, la curación puede ser lenta.
• Es común que estas infecciones fúngicas se repitan.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Infección en las uñas causando que se vuelvan gruesas o se desmoronen.
• Infección bacteriana en adición a la infección por el hongo.
• Dispersión de la infección a todo el cuerpo (en las personas con sistemas inmunológicos débiles).

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le puede diagnosticar la infección examinado el área de piel afectada. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir un estudio de un raspado de piel o del pus.
• El tratamiento requiere medicamentos y medidas de autocuidado. Cualquier condición de la piel que puede haber conducido a la candi-diasis debe ser tratada también.
• Mantenga la piel fresca y seca. Exponga la piel afectada al aire fresco, tanto como sea posible.
• Use ropa de algodón que le quede suelta. Evite las telas de material sintético o de lana. Cámbiese los calcetines frecuentemente si los pies están afectados.
• Para evitar propagar los microorganismos, no camine descalzo en pisos mojados donde otros pueden caminar. No comparta toallas. Limpie el baño o la ducha después que lo use.
• Proteja la piel de lesiones, pero no vende la piel afectada.

MEDICAMENTOS
Por lo general se recetan medicamentos antifúngicos para aplicarse a la piel. Aplíquese una pequeña cantidad dándose un masaje suave en el sitio afectado, como se lo indiquen. Use solamente lo suficiente para cubrir el área. No ayuda usar más cantidad. En casos más graves medicamentos antifúngicos orales pueden ser recetados.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin restricciones, excepto evitar el calor y la traspiración.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial. El comer yogur o tomar suplementos probióticos puede que le ayude o no, a prevenir infecciones por hongo (la investigación es poco clara).

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de candidiasis.
• Durante el tratamiento ocurre lo siguiente:
– La infección continúa extendiéndose a pesar del tratamiento.
– Aparecen signos de infección bacteriana secundaria. Los signos incluyen dolor, hipersensibilidad, enrojecimiento, calor y supuración.
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

CANKER SORES (Aphthous Ulcers)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Canker sores are painful ulcers (sores) that occur in the lining of the mouth. They cannot be spread from one person to another. They may be confused with herpes infections. Canker sores affect both sexes, but are more common in women.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Ulcers are small, very painful, shallow, and covered by a gray membrane. Borders are surrounded by an intense red halo.
• Ulcers appear on lips, gums, inner cheeks, tongue, palate, and throat. Usually, 2 or 3 ulcers appear during an attack. As many as 10 to 15 ulcers is not uncommon.
• Ulcers may be so painful during first 2 or 3 days that they interfere with eating or speaking.
• Sometimes there is tingling or burning for 24 hours before the ulcer appears.
• In severe cases, fever, tiredness, or swollen lymph nodes may occur.

CAUSES
Exact cause is unknown.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Emotional or physical stress, anxiety, or premenstrual tension.
• Injury to the mouth lining caused by rough dentures, hot food, toothbrushing, or dental work.
• Irritation from foods, such as chocolate, citrus, acidic foods (e.g., vinegar, pickles), salted nuts, or potato chips.
• Changes in the body’s immune system.
• Family history of canker sores.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Brush teeth at least twice a day. Floss regularly to keep the mouth clean and healthy.
• Avoid risk factors where possible.
• Pay attention to your diet and when canker sores develop. Don’t eat foods that seem to trigger the sores.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Most will heal on their own in 2 weeks. It is common for them to recur. Recurrence can vary from a single canker sore 2 or 3 times a year, to frequent episodes of many sores.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
Rarely, dehydration may occur if eating and drinking are limited by the pain of the canker sores.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Usually all that is needed for treatment is self-care.
• If you are concerned about the sores, see your health care provider. Canker sores can normally be diagnosed by an exam of the mouth. A culture of the sores may be done to rule out herpes infection.
• Rinse the mouth 3 or more times a day with a salt solution (1/2 teaspoon salt to 8 oz. water) if this isn’t painful. You may try dabbing milk of magnesia on the canker sore several times a day. It can help relieve pain.
• If a canker sore is caused by a rough tooth, braces, or dentures, consult your dentist. The sore won’t heal until the cause is treated.

MEDICATIONS

• Nonprescription topical products are available that can help relieve canker sore discomfort.
• You may be prescribed an antibacterial mouth rinse, a corticosteroid ointment or rinse, a solution to control pain and irritation, or other drug therapy.

ACTIVITY
No limits.

DIET

• Avoid foods that irritate the sores. Drink lots of fluids. If possible, eat a well-balanced diet while healing.
• To avoid pain, sip liquids through straws. Foods that cause the least pain are milk, liquid gelatin, yogurt, ice cream, and custard.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has canker sores that don’t improve in 2 weeks.
• Other symptoms occur at the same time as canker sores.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ULCERAS BUCALES (Afta, o Estomatitis Aftosa) (Canker Sores [Aphthous Ulcers]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Afta son úlceras (llagas) dolorosas que aparecen en el revestimiento de la boca. No pueden ser propagadas de una persona a otra. Pueden ser confundidas con infecciones del herpes. Las úlceras bucales afectan a personas de ambos sexos, pero son más comunes en las mujeres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Ulceras pequeñas, muy dolorosas, superficiales y cubiertas por una membrana gris. Los bordes exhiben un halo de color rojo intenso.
• Ulceras que aparecen en los labios, las encías, dentro de las mejillas, la lengua, el paladar y la garganta. Generalmente, 2 ó 3 úlceras aparecen durante un brote. Pero no es extraño encontrar de 10 a 15 úlceras.
• Durante los primeros 2 ó 3 días las úlceras pueden ser tan dolorosas que dificulten el comer o hablar.
• En algunas ocasiones 24 horas antes de aparecer las úlceras se puede sentir una sensación de hormigueo o ardor.
• En casos graves, fiebre, cansancio o inflamación de los ganglios linfáticos pueden ocurrir.

CAUSAS
La causa exacta es desconocida.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Estrés emocional o físico; ansiedad o tensión premenstrual.
• Lesión en el revestimiento de la boca causada por dentaduras postizas ásperas, comidas calientes, cepillos de diente o trabajo dental.
• Irritación causada por alimentos, tales como el chocolate, cítricos, comidas ácidas (vinagre, encurtidos), nueces saladas o papitas fritas.
• Cambios en el sistema inmunológico del cuerpo.
• Antecedentes familiares de úlceras bucales.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Lávese los dientes al menos dos veces al día. Pásese el hilo dental re-gularmente para mantener la boca limpia y saludable.
• Evite los factores de riesgo cuando sea posible.
• Preste atención a la dieta y a cuándo las úlceras bucales aparecen. No coma alimentos que parecen provocar las úlceras.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
La mayoría de las úlceras sanan por sí solas en 2 semanas. Es común que los brotes recurran y varíen desde una sola úlcera 2 ó 3 veces al año, hasta episodios frecuentes de úlceras múltiples.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Deshidratación en casos donde se hace muy difícil comer y beber por el dolor de las úlceras bucales; esto ocurre rara vez.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Generalmente todo el tratamiento que se necesita es autocuidado.
• Si está preocupado acerca de las llagas, vea a su proveedor de atención médica. Las úlceras bucales generalmente son diagnosticadas por un examen bucal. Se puede hacer un cultivo de las úlceras para descartar la posibilidad de infecciones con herpes.
• Enjuáguese la boca 3 o más veces al día con una solución salada (1/2 cucharadita de sal en 8 onzas de agua) si no es doloroso. Usted puede tratar de aplicar suavemente leche de magnesia sobre las aftas varias veces por día. Puede ayudar a aliviar el dolor.
• Si la causa de las aftas es un diente áspero, frenillos o dentaduras postizas, consulte al dentista. La úlcera no cicatrizará hasta que se elimine lo que la provoque.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Productos tópicos sin prescripción que le pueden ayudar a aliviar las molestias de las aftas se encuentran disponibles.
• Se le puede prescribir un enjuague de boca antibacteriano, un ungüento o enjuague corticosteroide, una solución para controlar el dolor e irritación u otra terapia de medicamentos.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin restricciones.

DIETA

• Evite los alimentos que puedan irritar las aftas. Beba mucho líquido. Si es posible, coma una dieta bien equilibrada mientras se esté curando.
• Para evitar el dolor, beba sorbos de líquido a través de una pajita. Los alimentos que causan menos dolor son la leche, la gelatina líquida, el yogur, el helado y el flan.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene úlceras bucales que no mejoran en 2 semanas.
• Otros síntomas ocurren al mismo tiempo que las aftas.
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Carbon monoxide poisoning occurs after breathing in carbon monoxide (CO), a poison gas that has no color or smell. In the United States, it is the most common form of accidental poisoning. CO is produced when fuel such as gas, wood, oil, or coal is burned. Sources include motor vehicle or boat exhaust, space heaters, furnaces, charcoal grills, gas burning appliances or tools, propane-fueled equipment, and smoke from fires.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• The first symptoms may be mild and flu-like.
• Headache; feeling dizzy and tired.
• Nausea and vomiting; stomach pain.
• Feeling like you might faint; trouble with walking.
• Difficulty breathing; chest pain; changes in heartbeat.
• Seizure.
• Vision changes.
• Confusion, depression, and other behavior changes.
• Coma (loss of consciousness).

CAUSES
Carbon monoxide is breathed into the lungs. It gets into the blood system and prevents the flow of oxygen that the body needs for survival.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Furnaces or space-heating devices that do not work properly; a fireplace with a clogged chimney.
• Riding in the back of a pickup truck under a closed cover of some type.
• Poor venting (exhaust fumes escape into buildings or homes).
• Use of charcoal grill in enclosed place, such as a tent.
• Faulty motor vehicle exhaust system, or leaving a car running in a garage attached to a house.
• Winter months when heaters are in use and houses are more closed up.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Avoid the risk factors where you are able.
• Install a carbon monoxide alarm in your home. If it goes off, leave the house right away and call 911.
• Make sure the furnace, fireplaces, gas appliances, and heaters in your home work properly. Call your gas company if you think there may be a gas leak.
• Have a smoke alarm and fire extinguisher for each floor of your home. Develop an emergency exit plan.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES

• In milder cases with quick treatment, recovery is complete and without complications.
• Some patients have delayed symptoms weeks later. They may feel extra tired, have memory problems, feel confused, or have mood and behavior changes.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Poisoning can result in damage to the brain, heart, or lungs, and death. Children, the elderly, and those with lung disease are at high risk for adverse effects.
• Pregnant women may suffer miscarriage, early labor, fetal death, or a child with cerebral palsy.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• If CO poisoning is suspected, move yourself or victim to fresh air. Seek emergency help.
• This type of poisoning cannot be treated at home. Medical care is needed. Your health care provider will do a physical exam and test your blood for carbon monoxide. Other medical tests may be done for more severe symptoms.
• For mild cases, the symptoms usually disappear after you breathe in pure oxygen through a mask for a few hours.
• Some patients with more severe symptoms will require the use of breathing support in a hospital.
• Rarely, a patient is placed in a sealed chamber where high-pressure oxygen is used for treatment.
• The source of the carbon monoxide needs to be found and repaired or replaced.
• To learn more: Consumer Product Safety Commission; (800) 638-2772; website: www.cpsc.gov or the Medline Plus website: www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/carbonmonoxidepoisoning.html .

MEDICATIONS
Usually not needed. Drugs may be used for seizures if they occur.

ACTIVITY
Limits will depend on how severe the symptoms are.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning. Seek emergency help!
• Symptoms get worse, recur, or new symptoms occur after recovery.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ENVENENAMIENTO CON MONOXIDO DE CARBONO (Carbon Monoxide Poisoning) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
El envenenamiento con monóxido de carbono ocurre después de aspirar monóxido de carbono (CO), un gas venenoso que es incoloro e inodoro. En los Estados Unidos, es la forma más común de envenenamiento accidental. El CO se produce al quemar combustibles como la gasolina, madera, petróleo o carbón. Las fuentes incluyen los gases de escape de los vehículos o botes motorizados, calentadores, calderas, parrillas de carbón, aparatos que queman gas, o herramientas, equipos a gas propano y humo de un fuego o incendios.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Los primeros síntomas pueden ser leves y parecidos a los de la influenza.
• Dolor de cabeza, sentirse mareado y cansado.
• Náusea y vómitos; dolor de estómago.
• Sentir que va a desmayarse, dificultad para caminar.
• Dificultad para respirar, dolor de pecho y cambios en el ritmo cardiaco.
• Convulsiones.
• Cambios en la vista.
• Confusión, depresión y otros cambios de comportamiento.
• Coma (pérdida del conocimiento).

CAUSAS
El monóxido de carbono se respira hasta los pulmones. Entonces entra en el sistema sanguíneo y previene el flujo de oxígeno que el cuerpo necesita para sobrevivir.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Hornos, calderas o aparatos calentadores que no funcionan apro-piadamente; una chimenea que tiene el tubo de escape tapado.
• Ir en la parte de atrás de una camioneta debajo de algún tipo de cubierta.
• Ventilación pobre (gases de escape entran al interior de los edificios u hogares).
• Uso de una parrilla de carbón en un lugar cerrado, tal como una tienda de campaña.
• Sistema de escape de gases defectuoso en un vehículo de motor, o dejar el auto encendido en un garaje conectado a un hogar.
• Los meses invernales, cuando se usa la calefacción y las casas están más cerradas.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Evite los factores de riesgo cuando sea posible.
• Instale detectores de monóxido de carbono en su hogar. Si la alarma suena, salga de la casa inmediatamente y llame al 911.
• Asegúrese que la caldera, la chimenea, los aparatos de gas y los calentadores en su hogar funcionan apropiadamente. Llame a la compañía de gas si cree que puede haber una fuga de gas.
• Tenga un detector de humo y un extintor de incendios en cada piso de su hogar. Desarrolle un plan de escape de emergencia.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS

• En casos más leves con tratamiento pronto, la recuperación es completa y sin complicaciones.
• Algunos pacientes tienen síntomas retrasados semanas más tarde. Estos pueden sentirse extraordinariamente cansados, tener problemas de memoria, sentirse confundidos o tener cambios de ánimo o personalidad.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• El envenenamiento puede resultar en daño al cerebro, al corazón, a los pulmones y en la muerte. Los niños, las personas mayores y aquellos con enfermedad pulmonar tienen un alto riesgo de efectos adversos.
• Las mujeres embarazadas pueden sufrir un aborto, parto temprano, muerte fetal o un niño con parálisis cerebral.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Si sospecha un envenenamiento con CO, muévase usted o mueva a la víctima al aire fresco. Busque ayuda de emergencia.
• Este tipo de envenenamiento no puede ser tratado en el hogar. Se necesita atención médica. Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y analizará la sangre para detectar monóxido de carbono. Se pueden hacer otros exámenes médicos para los síntomas más severos.
• Para los casos leves, los síntomas generalmente desaparecen después de respirar oxígeno puro a través de una máscara por unas cuantas horas.
• Algunos pacientes con síntomas más severos requerirán el uso de equipo de respiración asistida en un hospital.
• Rara vez, se puede colocar al paciente en una cámara sellada en la cual se usa oxígeno a alta presión para el tratamiento.
• La fuente del monóxido de carbono debe ser encontrada y reparada o reemplazada.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: Consumer Product Safety Commission, (800) 638-2772, sitio web: www.cpsc.gov o el sitio web de Medline Plus, www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/carbonmonoxidepoisoning.html .

MEDICAMENTOS
Generalmente no son necesarios. Se pueden usar medicamentos para las convulsiones, si ocurren.

ACTIVIDAD
Los límites dependerán de cuán severos son los síntomas.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de envenenamiento con monóxido de carbono. ¡Busque ayuda de emergencia!
• Los síntomas empeoran o reaparecen, u aparecen síntomas nuevos después de la recuperación.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

CARCINOID SYNDROME

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Carcinoid syndrome is a group of symptoms caused by a tumor (carcinoid). Carcinoids are called “cancers in slow motion” because of their slow growth. These tumors most often develop in the intestinal tract (e.g., small intestine, colon, or appendix) or lungs. The tumors produce certain hormones (e.g., serotonin). When the tumor is within the intestine, the hormones are removed from the body by the liver. If the tumor has spread to the liver, it can no longer remove them. The hormones then travel through the body and cause the carcinoid syndrome symptoms. If the tumors occur outside the intestinal tract (e.g., lungs), carcinoid syndrome can develop without spread to the liver. The syndrome more often affects older adults ages 50 to 70.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Because the tumors grow slowly, there may be no apparent symptoms.
• Symptoms may be triggered by physical or emotional stress, eating, and/or drinking hot liquids or alcohol.
• Flushing on the head, neck, and chest. It may last minutes or hours. Skin may turn bluish after flushing.
• Diarrhea with abdominal cramps.
• Breathing problems (similar to asthma) and wheezing.
• Heart palpitations or irregular heartbeat.
• May have high or low blood pressure.
• Swelling of the face, hands, or feet.
• Weight loss.
• Intestinal obstruction may cause fever along with stomach pain and tenderness.

CAUSES
Unknown.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Older adults.
• Family history of multiple endocrine neoplasia, type 1 (a hereditary disorder).

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Cannot be prevented at present.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
In some, it can be cured with surgery. In others, the problem may progress, recur, or relapse.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Low blood pressure. It can increase risk of falls and injury.
• Carcinoid heart disease.
• Intestinal obstruction.
• Carcinoid crisis (a severe episode of the symptoms).
• Renal failure.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms. Blood and urine studies are done to look for certain hormones and chemicals. Different imaging tests are done to locate the tumor and check for any disease spread.
• Treatment varies and depends on the location and size of the tumor, person’s health, age, and preferences.
• Surgery can bring about a cure if the entire tumor is removed. If the entire tumor cannot be removed, surgery can be done to remove a portion as large as possible. This helps relieve symptoms.
• Hepatic artery embolization may be used to cut off blood supply to the tumor. Radiofrequency ablation uses heat to kill the cancer cells. Other procedures may be done depending on any complications.
• Avoid emotional stress that can trigger symptoms.
• To learn more: American Cancer Society; (800) ACS-2345; website: www.cancer.org or National Cancer Institute; (800) 4-CANCER; website: www.cancer.gov .

MEDICATIONS

• Your health care provider may prescribe:
– Antidiarrheal drugs.
– Anticancer drugs (chemotherapy).
– Drugs to prevent serotonin production.
– Biologic therapy to stimulate the immune system.
– Drugs to prevent flushed skin.
– Multivitamins and niacin supplements.

ACTIVITY
Mild physical activity is usually not harmful. Avoid intense physical activity that can trigger symptoms.

DIET

• Increased protein intake in the diet is often advised.
• Avoid alcohol and foods that trigger symptoms.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of carcinoid syndrome.
• Symptoms become worse or drugs used for treatment cause unexpected side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

SINDROME CARCINOIDE (Carcinoid Syndrome) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
El síndrome carcinoide es un grupo de síntomas causados por un tumor (carcinoide). Los carcinoides se llaman "cánceres en movimiento lento" debido a su crecimiento lento. Estos tumores a menudo se desarrollan en el tracto intestinal (p. ej., el intestino delgado, el colon o el apéndice) o los pulmones. Los tumores producen ciertas hormonas (p. ej., serotonina). Cuando el tumor se encuentra dentro del intestino, el hígado extrae las hormonas del cuerpo. Si el tumor se ha propagado al hígado, este ya no los puede extraer. Entonces las hormonas viajan a través del cuerpo y producen los síntomas del síndrome carcinoide. Si los tumores aparecen fuera del tracto intestinal (p. ej., en los pulmones), el síndrome carcinoide se puede desarrollar sin propagarse al hígado. El síndrome afecta con más frecuencia a los adultos mayores entre los 50 y 70 años de edad.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Debido a que los tumores crecen lentamente, puede no haber síntomas aparentes.
• Los síntomas pueden ser producidos por estrés físico o emocional, la comida, y / o beber líquidos calientes o bebidas alcohólicas.
• Enrojecimiento en la cabeza, cuello y pecho. Puede durar minutos u horas. La piel se puede volver azulada después del enrojecimiento.
• Diarrea con cólicos abdominales.
• Problemas respiratorios (similares al asma) y respiración sibilante.
• Palpitaciones del corazón o latidos irregulares.
• Puede tener presión arterial elevada o baja.
• Hinchazón de la cara, manos o pies.
• Pérdida de peso.
• Una obstrucción intestinal puede producir fiebre acompañada de dolor y sensibilidad estomacal.

CAUSAS
Desconocidas.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Adultos mayores.
• Antecedentes familiares de neoplasia endocrina múltiple (NEM) tipo 1 (un trastorno hereditario).

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
En la actualidad no se puede prevenir.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
En algunos casos, puede curarse con cirugía. En otros, el problema puede progresar, recurrir o recaer.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Presión sanguínea baja.
• Puede aumentar el riesgo de caídas y lesiones.
• Enfermedad cardiaca carcinoide.
• Obstrucción del intestino.
• Crisis carcinoide (un episodio grave de los síntomas).
• Insuficiencia renal

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas. Se realizan estudios de la sangre y la orina en busca de ciertas hormonas y sustancias químicas. Se realizan diferentes pruebas de imágenes para localizar el tumor y detectar si la enfermedad se ha diseminado.
• El tratamiento varía y depende de la localización y tamaño del tumor, la salud, edad y preferencias de la persona.
• La cirugía puede llevar a una cura si se extirpa enteramente el tumor. Si no se puede extirpar el tumor entero, se puede llevar a cabo cirugía para extirpar una porción tan grande como sea posible. Esto ayuda a aliviar los síntomas.
• Se puede utilizar embolización arterial hepática para obstruir el suministro de sangre al tumor. La ablación por radiofrecuencia usa el calor para eliminar las células cancerosas. Se pueden utilizar otros proce-dimientos dependiendo de cualquier complicación.
• Evite el estrés emocional, ya que puede desencadenar los síntomas.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: American Cancer Society, 800-ACS-2345; sitio web: www.cancer.org, o a National Cancer Institute, 800-4-CANCER; sitio web: www.cancer.gov .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Su proveedor de atención médica puede recetarle:
– Medicamentos antidiarreicos.
– Medicamentos anticancerosos (quimioterapia).
– Medicamentos para evitar la producción de serotonina.
– Terapia biológica para estimular el sistema inmunológico.
– Medicamentos para evitar el enrojecimiento de la piel.
– Medicamentos con cortisona para reducir la inflamación.
– Suplementos vitamínicos y niacina.

ACTIVIDAD
La actividad física moderada generalmente no hace daño. Evite hacer ejercicios vigorosos que pueden desencadenar los síntomas.

DIETA

• Con frecuencia se recomienda el aumento de proteína en la dieta.
• Evite las bebidas alcohólicas y los alimentos que puedan inducir los síntomas.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tienen síntomas del síndrome carcinoide.
• Los síntomas empeoran o el uso de los medicamentos del tratamiento produce efectos secundarios inesperados.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

CARCINOMA, BASAL CELL

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a cancer that develops in the skin’s basal layer. The basal layer is at the bottom of the skin’s outer layer (epidermis). BCC is the most common type of skin cancer. It usually involves the skin exposed to sun (e.g., face, ears, backs of hands, shoulders, and arms). Adults over age 40 are most often affected, and men more than women.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• The skin cancer can vary in size and appearance. It usually grows slowly over months or even years.
• A sore that does not heal within 3 weeks or heals and recurs. It may bleed, ooze, or have a crust.
• An area or patch of skin that is reddish or irritated. It might have a crust.
• A shiny, pearly looking bump on the skin. The color is usually pink, red, or white. On some people, the color may be tan, black, or brown and look like a mole.
• A skin growth that is pink with a slightly raised, rolled border. The center is crusted and is lower than the border. Tiny blood vessels may be seen as it grows larger.
• An area that looks like a white or yellow scar. The skin is shiny and looks tight. This type is more rare.

CAUSES
The cause appears to be ultraviolet damage to skin cells. Genetic factors also play a role.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sun exposure. Tanning lamps or booths are also risks. UV rays damage the skin. The effect is cumulative over a lifetime.
• People with fair skin or those who sunburn easily.
• Living in an area where there is lots of sunlight.
• Older adults and males more than females.
• Radiation therapy.
• Family history of skin cancers.
• Previous skin cancer.
• Other, more rare risk factors.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Limit exposure to sunlight. Protect skin with a hat, clothing, and sunscreen with SPF of 15 or more. Reapply sunscreen every 2 hours during sun exposure.
• Perform a skin self-exam once a month. Check for new growths or changes in growths already present.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Curable in almost all cases with early diagnosis and treatment. People who have had skin cancer are at higher risk for new skin cancers elsewhere on the skin.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Rarely, skin cancer may recur or spread.
• Complications or scarring from the surgery.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will examine the affected skin area. All or part of the affected skin tissue may be removed for a biopsy. The tissue is then viewed under a microscope to see if it is cancerous.
• Treatment varies with appearance, extent, and location of the skin cancer. The treatment method chosen will often be decided by you and your health care provider together. Options can include:
– Curettage and electrodesiccation—local anesthetic applied, then cutting out or shaving of the cancer, followed by high-frequency electrical current to destroy tissue with heat.
– Surgical excision—local anesthetic is applied, skin is marked for surgery, and a scalpel is used for excision.
– Moh’s surgery—a special type of surgery used to treat high-risk cancers, especially on the head and face.
– Cryosurgery—use of liquid nitrogen to freeze and kill the cells. A local anesthetic is sometimes used.
– Topical drug therapy—available in some cases.
– Laser treatment’sometimes used.
– Radiation treatment—used if cancer location requires it, such as locations near lips and eyelids.
– Photodynamic therapy—uses drugs and special light.
• A skin graft or flap may be used to repair the skin.
• Your health care provider will advise you of any follow-up care needed after the treatment procedure.
• To learn more: American Cancer Society; (800) ACS-2345; website: www.cancer.org or National Cancer Institute; (800) 4-CANCER; website: www.cancer.gov .

MEDICATIONS
Topical drugs (chemotherapy) may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY
No limits.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has signs of skin cancer.
• After treatment, any new skin symptoms develop.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

BASALIOMA (Carcinoma de Células Basales, Carcinoma Basocelular) (Carcinoma, Basal Cell) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
El basalioma (o BCC, por sus siglas en inglés) es un cáncer de la piel que afecta la capa basocelular. La capa basocelular es la capa más profunda de la capa exterior de la piel (epidermis). El basalioma es el tipo de cáncer de la piel más común. Normalmente este afecta la piel expuesta al sol (p. ej., la cara, orejas, dorso de las manos, hombros y brazos). Con mayor frecuencia afecta a adultos mayores de 40 años y afecta a más hombres que mujeres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• El cáncer de la piel puede variar en tamaño y apariencia. Generalmente crece lentamente durante meses o incluso años.
• Una llaga que no sana dentro de tres semanas o se sana y reaparece. Puede sangrar, supurar o tener una costra.
• Un área o parche en la piel que está enrojecida o irritada. Puede tener una costra.
• Una protuberancia brillosa en la piel que se ve perlada. El color normalmente es rosado, rojo o blanco. En otras personas, el color puede ser bronceado, negro o marrón y parece un lunar.
• Una protuberancia en la piel color rosado con los bordes levemente levantados y enrollados. El centro es encostrado y más bajo que los bordes. Vasos sanguíneos pequeños pueden ser vistos a medida que crece.
• Un área que se ve como una cicatriz blanca o amarrilla. La piel es bri-llosa y aparece tiesa. Este tipo es más raro.

CAUSAS
La causa parece ser el daño ocasionado por los rayos ultravioletas a las células de la piel. Factores genéticos también juegan un papel.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Radiación ultravioleta (UV) por exposición al sol. Las lámparas o cabinas bronceadoras también son un riesgo. Los rayos UV dañan la piel. El efecto es acumulativo a lo largo de la vida.
• Personas con tez clara o aquellos que se queman fácilmente con el sol.
• Vivir en un área donde hay mucha luz solar.
• Adultos mayores y los hombres más que las mujeres.
• Radioterapia .
• Antecedentes familiares de cánceres de la piel.
• Previo cáncer de la piel.
• Otros factores de riesgo menos comunes.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Limite la exposición al sol. Proteja la piel de la exposición a los rayos solares con un sombrero, ropa y crema protectora con un factor de protección solar (SPF, por sus siglas en inglés) de 15 o más. Aplíquese crema protectora cada 2 horas durante la exposición a los rayos solares.
• Revísese la piel una vez al mes. Revise si hay crecimientos nuevos o cambios en los crecimientos existentes.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Es curable en casi todos los casos con diagnosis y tratamiento tempranos. Personas que han tenido cáncer en la piel tienen un mayor riesgo de cáncer en la piel en otra parte de la piel.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• En raras ocasiones el cáncer de la piel puede volver a ocurrir o expandirse.
• Complicaciones o cicatrices por la cirugía.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica examinará el área afectada de la piel. Todo, o parte del tejido de la piel afectada puede ser removido para una biopsia. El tejido es entonces analizado bajo un microscopio para encontrar si es canceroso.
• La selección del tratamiento varía según la apariencia, extensión y ubicación del cáncer de la piel. El método de tratamiento escogido es frecuentemente decidido por usted y su proveedor de atención médica. Las opciones pueden incluir:
– Legrado y electrocoagulación –se aplica anestesia local, y después se corta o se raspa el cáncer, seguido esto de una corriente eléctrica de alta frecuencia que destruye el tejido por medio de calor–.
– Extirpación quirúrgica –se aplica anestesia local, después se marca la piel para la cirugía y se utiliza un bisturí para la extirpación–.
– Cirugía Mohs –un tipo especializado de cirugía utilizado para tratar cánceres de alto riesgo, especialmente en la cabeza y la cara–.
– Criocirugía –uso de nitrógeno líquido para congelar y matar las células. Algunas veces se usa anestesia local–.
– Terapia de medicamentos tópicos –disponible en algunos casos–.
– Tratamiento de láser –es algunas veces usado–.
– Tratamiento de radiación –se usa si la ubicación del cáncer lo requiere, tales como aquellos ubicados cerca de los labios y párpados–.
– La terapia fotodinámica usa fármacos y una luz especial.
• Se puede usar un injerto o lengüeta de piel para reparar la piel.
• Su proveedor de atención médica le aconsejará acerca de los cuidados necesarios después del procedimiento.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: American Cancer Society, 800-ACS-2345; sitio web: www.cancer.org o National Cancer Institute, (800) 4-CANCER; sitio web: www.cancer.gov .

MEDICAMENTOS
Medicamentos tópicos (quimioterapia) pueden ser recetados.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin restricciones.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene signos de cáncer en la piel.
• Después del tratamiento, se desarrolla cualquier síntoma nuevo en la piel.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

CARCINOMA, SQUAMOUS CELL

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Squamous cell carcinoma is a cancer that develops in the skin’s squamous cells. These cells make up the skin’s outer layer (epithelium). The cancer usually involves the skin of the face, ears, backs of hands, shoulders, and arms. Adults over age 40 are most often affected, and men more often than women. It is the second most common type of skin cancer.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• A sore that does not heal within 3 weeks. It may bleed or ooze or have a crust.
• An area or patch of skin that is reddish or irritated. It might have a crust.
• A shiny, pearly looking skin bump. The color is usually pink, red, or white. On some people, the color may be tan, black, or brown and look like a mole.
• A skin growth that is pink with a slightly raised, rolled border. The center is crusted and is lower than the border. Tiny blood vessels may be seen as it grows larger.
• An area that looks like a white or yellow scar. The skin is shiny and looks tight. This type is more rare.

CAUSES
The cause appears to be ultraviolet damage to skin cells. Genetic factors also play a role.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sun exposure. Tanning lamps or booths are also risks. UV damages the skin. The effect is cumulative over a lifetime.
• People with fair skin or those who sunburn easily.
• Living in an area where there is lots of sunlight.
• Older adults and males more than females.
• Radiation therapy.
• Family history of skin cancers.
• Previous skin cancer.
• Other, more rare risk factors.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Limit exposure to sunlight. Protect skin with a hat, clothing, and sunscreen with SPF of 15 or more. Reapply sunscreen every 2 hours during sun exposure.
• Perform a skin self-exam once a month. Check for new growths or changes in growths already present.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Curable in almost all cases with early diagnosis and treatment. People who have had skin cancer are at higher risk for new skin cancers elsewhere on the skin.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Rarely, skin cancer may recur or spread.
• Complications or scarring from the surgery.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will examine the affected skin area. All or part of the affected skin tissue may be removed for a biopsy. The tissue is then viewed under a microscope to see if it is cancerous.
• Treatment varies with appearance, extent, and location of the skin cancer. The treatment method chosen will often be decided by you and your health care provider together. Options can include:
– Curettage and electrodesiccation—local anesthetic applied, then cutting out or shaving of the cancer, followed by high-frequency electrical current to destroy tissue with heat.
– Surgical excision—local anesthetic is applied, skin is marked for surgery, and a scalpel is used for excision.
– Moh’s surgery—a special type of surgery used to treat high-risk cancers, especially on the head and face.
– Cryosurgery—use of liquid nitrogen to freeze and kill the cells. A local anesthetic is sometimes used.
– Topical drug therapy—available in some cases.
– Laser treatment’sometimes used.
– Radiation treatment—used if cancer location requires it, such as locations near lips and eyelids.
– Photodynamic therapy—uses drugs and special light.
• A skin graft or flap may be used to repair the skin.
• Your health care provider will advise you of any follow-up care needed after the treatment procedure.
• To learn more: American Cancer Society; (800) ACS-2345; website: www.cancer.org or National Cancer Institute; (800) 4-CANCER; website: www.cancer.gov .

MEDICATIONS
Topical drugs (chemotherapy) may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY
No limits.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has signs of skin cancer.
• After treatment, any new skin symptoms develop.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

CARCINOMA DE CELULAS ESCAMOSAS (Carcinoma, Squamous Cell) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Carcinoma de células escamosas es un cáncer de la piel que se desarro-lla en las células escamosas. Estas células forman la superficie externa de la piel (epitelio). El cáncer normalmente afecta la piel de la cara, orejas, dorso de las manos, hombros y brazos. Afecta con más frecuencia a los adultos mayores de 40 años y afecta a más hombres que mujeres. Es el segundo tipo de cáncer de la piel más común.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Una llaga que no sana en tres semanas. Puede sangrar, supurar o tener una costra.
• Un área o parche en la piel que está enrojecido o irritado. Puede tener una costra.
• Una protuberancia brillosa en la piel que se ver perlada. El color normalmente es rosado, rojo o blanco. En otras personas, el color puede ser bronceado, negro o marrón y parece un lunar.
• Una protuberancia en la piel color rosado con los bordes levemente levantados y enrollados. El centro está encostrado y más bajo que los bordes. Vasos sanguíneos pequeños pueden ser vistos a medida que crece.
• Un área que se ve como una cicatriz blanca o amarilla. La piel es bri-llosa y se ve tirante. Este tipo es más raro.

CAUSAS
La causa parece ser el daño ocasionado por los rayos ultravioletas a las células de la piel. Factores genéticos también juegan un papel.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Radiación ultravioleta (UV) por exposición al sol. Las lámparas o cabinas bronceadoras también son un riesgo. Los rayos UV dañan la piel. El efecto es acumulativo a lo largo de la vida.
• Personas con tez clara o aquellos que se queman fácilmente con el sol.
• Vivir en un área donde hay mucha luz solar.
• Adultos mayores y los hombres más que las mujeres.
• Radioterapia .
• Antecedentes familiares de cánceres de la piel.
• Previo cáncer de la piel.
• Otros factores de riesgo menos comunes.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Limite la exposición al sol. Proteja la piel de la exposición a los rayos solares con un sombrero, ropa y crema protectora con un factor de protección solar (SPF, por sus siglas en inglés) de 15 o más. Aplíquese crema protectora cada 2 horas durante la exposición a los rayos solares.
• Revísese la piel una vez al mes. Revise si hay crecimientos nuevos o cambios en los crecimientos existentes.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Es curable en casi todos los casos con diagnosis y tratamiento tempranos. Personas que han tenido cáncer en la piel tienen un mayor riesgo de cáncer en la piel en otra parte de la piel.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• En raras ocasiones, el cáncer de la piel puede recurrir o expandirse.
• Complicaciones o cicatrices por la cirugía.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica examinará el área afectada de la piel. Todo o parte del tejido de la piel afectada puede ser removido para una biopsia. El tejido es entonces analizado bajo un microscopio para encontrar si es canceroso.
• La selección del tratamiento varía según la apariencia, extensión y ubicación del cáncer de la piel. El método de tratamiento escogido es frecuentemente decidido por usted y su proveedor de atención médica. Las opciones pueden incluir:
– Legrado y electrocoagulación –se aplica anestesia local, y después se corta o se raspa el cáncer, seguido esto de una corriente eléctrica de alta frecuencia que destruye el tejido por medio de calor–.
– Extirpación quirúrgica –se aplica anestesia local, después se marca la piel para la cirugía y se utiliza un bisturí para la extirpación–.
– Cirugía Mohs –un tipo especializado de cirugía utilizado para tratar cánceres de alto riesgo, especialmente en la cabeza y la cara–.
– Criocirugía –uso de nitrógeno líquido para congelar y matar las células. Algunas veces se usa anestesia local–.
– Terapia de medicamentos tópicos –disponible en algunos casos–.
– Tratamiento de láser –es algunas veces usado–.
– Tratamiento de radiación –se usa si la ubicación del cáncer lo requiere, tales como aquellos ubicados cerca de los labios y párpados–.
– La terapia fotodinámica usa fármacos y una luz especial.
• Se puede usar un injerto o lengüeta de piel para reparar la piel.
• Su proveedor de atención médica le aconsejará acerca de los cuidados necesarios después del procedimiento.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: American Cancer Society, 800-ACS-2345; sitio web: www.cancer.org o National Cancer Institute, (800) 4-CANCER; sitio web: www.cancer.gov .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Medicamentos tópicos (quimioterapia). pueden ser recetados.
• Antibióticos para prevenir infección de la piel pueden ser recetados.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin restricciones.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene signos de cáncer en la piel.
• Después del tratamiento se desarrolla cualquier síntoma nuevo en la piel.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

CARDIAC ARREST

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Cardiac arrest is the total loss of heart-pumping action. Delay of treatment for only 3 to 5 minutes may cause death or permanent brain damage. Up to age 45, it is more common in men. After age 45, the incidence is equal in men and women.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Brief dizziness; then fainting and unconsciousness.
• No pulse. Usually breathing also stops.
• Skin color becomes bluish-white. The pupils of the eye may get bigger.
• Seizures.
• Loss of bowel and bladder control (sometimes). Simple fainting may seem like a cardiac arrest, but heartbeat and breathing continue.

CAUSES
Heart stops beating suddenly. This may be due to a heart that is beating too fast, too slow, or that has an irregular heartbeat. Other causes include electrical shock, drowning, choking, trauma, or respiratory arrest (lungs stop working).

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Heart attack or heart disease.
• Pulmonary embolism (a blood clot to the lung).
• Lack of blood circulation and profound shock caused by uncontrolled bleeding or overwhelming infection.
• Loss of oxygen from drowning, choking, or from anesthesia during surgery.
• Potassium or fluid imbalance in the blood.
• Diabetes.
• Use of certain heart medicines.
• Use of medicines that help with fluid retention. These can cause low potassium in the blood.
• Use of any drug that raises blood pressure in a heart patient. This can include cold capsules, decongestant tablets, and nasal sprays.
• Using drugs of abuse, such as cocaine and intravenous drugs.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Live a healthy lifestyle. Get regular exercise, eat a healthy diet, maintain ideal weight for height, and don’t smoke.
• If you have heart disease or other risk factors, follow your treatment instructions carefully.
• Have family members and close friends learn CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation).

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
The victim may survive if emergency medical treatment is given in the first few minutes. The outcome depends on what caused the cardiac arrest.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
Death or permanent brain damage if heart action cannot be resumed in 3 to 5 minutes. Most patients die before reaching an emergency care center.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Rescuers should start CPR if the victim is unconscious (unresponsive), not moving, and not breathing. Even if the victim takes occasional gasps, rescuers should suspect cardiac arrest has occurred and should start CPR.
• Emergency medical care involves shocking the heart back into a normal heartbeat. This process is called defibrillation.
• Ensure that you and your family members learn CPR. Call your local Red Cross or hospital for information. You may save a life.
• If you have heart disease or have risk factors, wear a medical alert identification (a bracelet or neck tag).
• Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are being placed in public places (such as airports). They can be used by anyone to help a person who is having cardiac arrest.

MEDICATIONS
Drugs may be prescribed to treat the cause of cardiac arrest once the crisis is over.

ACTIVITY
After recovery, activities should be resumed gradually. Follow your health care provider’s instructions.

DIET
Don’t give fluids or foods to anyone with signs of cardiac arrest. He or she could choke.

CALL FOR EMERGENCY HELP

• If the victim is not conscious and not breathing:
– Call 911 (emergency) for an ambulance or medical help.
– Yell for help. Don’t leave the victim.
– Perform CPR.
– Don’t stop CPR until help arrives.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

PARO CARDIACO (Cardiac Arrest) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
El paro cardiaco es la pérdida total de la función de bombeo del corazón. Una demora de tan solo 3 a 5 minutos en el tratamiento puede causar la muerte o daño cerebral permanente. Hasta los 45 años, es más común en los hombres. Después de los 45 años, la incidencia es la misma en los hombres y las mujeres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Leve mareo, después un desmayo y pérdida del conocimiento.
• No hay pulso. Generalmente la respiración también para.
• Piel azulada blancuzca. Pupilas pueden estar dilatadas.
• Convulsiones.
• Pérdida del control del intestino y la vejiga (a veces). Un simple desmayo puede parecerse a un paro cardíaco, pero la diferencia es que el pulso y la respiración continúan.

CAUSAS
El corazón para de latir repentinamente. Esto puede deberse a que el corazón está latiendo muy rápido, muy lento o tiene un latido irregular. Otras causas pueden incluir un shock eléctrico, ahogo, haberse atragantado, trauma o paro respiratorio (los pulmones paran de funcionar).

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Ataque cardiaco o enfermedad cardiaca.
• Embolismo pulmonar (un coágulo de sangre en el pulmón).
• Falta de circulación sanguínea y shock profundo causado por una hemorragia incontrolable o una infección devastadora.
• Pérdida de oxígeno por ahogo, haberse atragantado o por la anestesia durante una cirugía.
• Desequilibrio de potasio o fluidos en la sangre.
• Diabetes.
• Uso de ciertos medicamentos para el corazón.
• Uso de medicamentos que ayudan con la retención de líquido. Estos pueden causar niveles bajos de potasio en la sangre.
• Cualquier medicamento que eleve la presión sanguínea en un paciente con problemas cardiacos. Estos pueden incluir cápsulas para resfrío, pastillas descongestionantes y atomizadores nasales.
• Abuso de drogas, como la cocaína y drogas intravenosas.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Lleve un estilo vida saludable. Haga ejercicio regularmente, coma una dieta saludable, mantenga el peso ideal para su altura y no fume.
• Si sufre del corazón u tiene otros factores de riesgo, siga sus instrucciones del tratamiento cuidadosamente.
• Haga que sus familiares y amigos más cercanos aprendan resucitación cardiopulmonar (o CPR, por sus siglas en inglés).

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
La víctima puede sobrevivir si tratamiento médico de emergencia es dado en los primeros minutos. El desenlace final depende de lo que causó el paro cardiaco.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Muerte o daño cerebral permanente si no se logra restablecer la acción del corazón en 3 a 5 minutos. La mayoría de los pacientes mueren antes de llegar a un centro de cuidado de emergencia.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Los rescatadores deben comenzar resucitación cardiopulmonar (CPR) si la víctima está inconsciente (no responde), no se mueve y no respira. Aun si la víctima jadea ocasionalmente, los rescatadores deben sospechar que tuvo un paro cardiaco y deben empezar CPR.
• El cuidado de emergencia involucra un choque eléctrico al corazón para que regresen los latidos normales. Este proceso se llama desfibrilación.
• Cerciórese que usted y sus familiares aprendan resucitación cardiopulmonar. Para más información llame a la Cruz Roja o al hospital de su zona. Puede llegar a salvar una vida.
• Si tiene problemas cardiacos o corre ese riesgo, use una identificación de alerta médica (brazalete o collar).
• Desfibriladores automáticos externos son colocados en lugares públicos (como en aeropuertos). Cualquiera puede usarlos para ayudar a una persona que está teniendo un paro cardiaco.

MEDICAMENTOS
Se pueden recetar medicamentos para tratar la causa del paro cardiaco una vez que haya pasado la crisis.

ACTIVIDAD
Después de haberse recuperado, debe reanudar las actividades en forma gradual. Siga las instrucciones de su proveedor de atención médica.

DIETA
No administre líquidos ni alimentos a alguien que presente signos de un paro cardiaco. La persona puede ahogarse.

LLAME PIDIENDO AYUDA DE EMERGENCIA

• Si la víctima está inconsciente y no respira:
– Llame al 911 (emergencia) para pedir una ambulancia o asistencia médica.
– Grite pidiendo ayuda. No deje a la víctima.
– Haga CPR (resucitación cardiopulmonar).
– No deje de dar resucitación cardiopulmonar hasta que la ayuda llegue.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

CARDIOMYOPATHY

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Cardiomyopathy is an inflammatory disorder of the heart muscle. Damage to the heart muscle causes the heart to enlarge and weaken and not be able to pump enough blood to the body. In addition, blood moves more slowly through an enlarged heart, allowing blood clots to form. Cardiomyopathy may affect adults of any age and is more common in males.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• If the condition is severe enough to cause heart failure, the following symptoms may occur:
– Rapid and abnormal heartbeat.
– Shortness of breath (may be worse when lying down or being physically active).
– Swollen legs, feet, and ankles.
– Feeling tired and weak.
– Chest pain.
– Loss of appetite (but, a weight gain may occur).
– Dizziness or fainting.
– Cough.

CAUSES
There are different types of cardiomyopathy. They can be caused by a variety of heath problems. Sometimes, no cause is found.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Coronary artery disease.
• Abuse of cocaine, heroin, organic solvents, etc.
• Alcoholism.
• Cancer treatment.
• Certain infections or other medical disorders.
• Chronic rapid heart rate.
• Family history of cardiomyopathy.
• Heart tissue damage from a previous heart attack.
• Heart valve problems.
• Long-term high blood pressure.
• Metabolic disorders (e.g., thyroid disease or diabetes).
• Myocarditis, or inflammation of the walls of the heart.
• Nutritional deficiency.
• Pregnancy.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Avoid risk factors, where possible.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Sometimes, the heart damage cannot be reversed. Improvement can occur. Treatment may help relieve symptoms and prevent further damage. Some patients may be considered for a heart transplant.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Congestive heart failure (can be life-threatening).
• Blood clots.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms and activities. Medical tests may include chest x-ray, heart function studies, and blood tests. A tube-like instrument may be inserted into the heart and a biopsy (removal of a sample of heart tissue for testing) may be done.
• The goals of treatment are to help the symptoms and to prevent complications. Treatment steps may involve lifestyle changes, drug therapy, and surgery.
• Lifestyle changes can include stopping the use of alcohol and cigarette smoking, diet changes, weight loss, and limiting physical activity.
• Surgery may include implanting a pacemaker to change the heart rate and pattern. Surgery to remove part of the thickened heart wall or replace heart valves may be needed.
• A heart transplant may be recommended if other treatments are not successful. A long wait for a transplant is normal. A mechanical device may be used to temporarily help the heart’s pumping function.

MEDICATIONS
Drugs may be prescribed to improve heart function, to slow and regulate the heart rate, get rid of extra fluid, lower blood pressure, relax blood vessels, and suppress the immune system.

ACTIVITY
Follow medical advice about physical activity limits and when it is safe to resume sexual relations.

DIET

• Eat a diet that is low in salt and fat. Avoid alcohol.
• Begin a weight-loss diet if you weigh more than is healthy for your body type.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has cardiomyopathy symptoms.
• Symptoms return after treatment.
• You have chest pain.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

CARDIOMIOPATIA (Cardiomyopathy) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La cardiomiopatía es un trastorno inflamatorio del músculo del corazón. El músculo del corazón dañado causa que el corazón se agrande y debilite y que no sea capaz de bombear suficiente sangre al cuerpo. En adición, la sangre se mueve más lentamente a través del corazón agrandado, permitiendo la formación de coágulos. La cardiomiopatía puede afectar a adultos de todas las edades y es más común en los hombres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Si el trastorno es lo suficientemente grave para causar un fallo cardiaco, los siguientes síntomas pueden ocurrir:
– Latido cardiaco rápido y anormal.
– Falta de aire (puede empeorar al acostarse o cuando está activo físicamente).
– Hinchazón de las piernas, los pies y los tobillos.
– Sentirse cansado y débil.
– Dolor de pecho.
– Pérdida de apetito (un aumento de peso, sin embargo, puede ocurrir).
– Mareos o desmayos.
– Tos.

CAUSAS
Hay diferentes tipos de cardiomiopatía. Pueden ser causadas por diversos problemas de salud. En algunas ocasiones, no se encuentra la causa.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Enfermedad de la arteria coronaria.
• Abuso de la cocaína, heroína, solventes orgánicos, etc.
• Alcoholismo.
• Tratamiento del cáncer.
• Ciertas infecciones u otros trastornos clínicos.
• Ritmo cardiaco rápido crónico.
• Antecedentes familiares de cardiomiopatía.
• Daño al tejido del corazón debido a un ataque cardiaco previo.
• Problemas de válvulas del corazón.
• Alta tensión arterial de largo plazo.
• Trastornos metabólicos (p. ej., enfermedad de la tiroides o diabetes).
• Miocarditis o inflamación de las paredes del corazón.
• Deficiencia nutricional.
• Embarazo.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
Evite los factores de riesgo cuando sea posible.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Algunas veces, el daño al corazón no es reversible. La mejoría puede ocurrir, en otras ocasiones. El tratamiento puede ayudar a aliviar los síntomas y prevenir mayores daños. Algunos pacientes pueden ser consi-derados para un trasplante de corazón.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Fallo cardiaco congestivo (puede poner en peligro la vida).
• Coágulos sanguíneos.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le hará un examen físico y le preguntará acerca de sus síntomas y actividades. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir una radiografía del pecho, estudios de la función cardiaca y análisis de sangre. Un instrumento que parece un tubo puede insertarse en el corazón para hacer una biopsia (remoción de una muestra de tejido del corazón para examinarlo).
• Las metas del tratamiento son aliviar los síntomas y prevenir complicaciones. Las medidas de tratamiento incluyen cambios en el estilo de vida, terapia de medicamentos y cirugía.
• Los cambios en el estilo de vida incluyen dejar de consumir alcohol y de fumar cigarrillos, cambios en la dieta, pérdida de peso y limitar las actividades físicas.
• La cirugía puede incluir la implantación de un marcapaso para cambiar el latido y patrón cardiaco. Se puede necesitar cirugía para remover parte de la pared cardiaca engrosada o reemplazar las válvulas del corazón.
• Se puede recomendar un trasplante de corazón si los otros tratamientos no son exitosos. Una larga espera para el trasplante es normal. Se puede usar un aparato mecánico temporalmente para ayudar la función de bombeo del corazón.

MEDICAMENTOS
Se pueden recetar medicamentos para mejorar la función del corazón, disminuir y regular el latido cardiaco, eliminar el fluido adicional, bajar la presión sanguínea, relajar los vasos sanguíneos y suprimir el sistema inmunológico.

ACTIVIDAD
Siga el asesoramiento médico acerca de los límites para la actividad física y acera de cuándo es seguro reanudar las relaciones sexuales.

DIETA

• Ingiera una dieta que sea baja en sal y grasa. Evite el alcohol.
• Comience una dieta de pérdida de peso si pesa más de lo que es saludable para su tipo de cuerpo.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de cardiomiopatía.
• Los síntomas regresan después del tratamiento.
• Tiene dolor de pecho.
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common nerve disorder that affects the hands and wrists. The carpal tunnel is a tunnel-like passageway located on the palm side of the wrist. It is made up of ligaments and bones. It surrounds the median nerve and tendons that go to the thumb and first two fingers. It usually affects adults and occurs in women much more than men.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Symptoms usually start gradually and often affect the thumb and the index and middle fingers. The dominant hand is usually affected first.
• Tingling or numbness in part of the hand.
• Sharp pains that shoot from the wrist up the arm, especially at night.
• Burning sensations in the fingers.
• Morning stiffness or cramping of hands.
• Thumb weakness.
• Inability to make a fist.

CAUSES
It is often the result of a combination of factors that increase pressure on the median nerve and tendons in the carpal tunnel. The median nerve becomes irritated, which leads to the hand symptoms.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Types of work that cause stress on the wrist (e.g., repetitive tasks, vibration, etc.) may increase risks. (Many people develop the condition regardless of the type of work they do.). Research is ongoing about the relationship of carpal tunnel syndrome and work.
• Women (possibly due to a smaller carpal tunnel).
• Certain medical or physical conditions may increase risk. These include arthritis, diabetes, hypothyroidism, alcoholism, obesity, menopause, pregnancy, or others.
• Wrist injury, fracture, dislocation, or other conditions that can cause inflammation in the wrist.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• There are no specific preventive measures.
• Get treatment for any medical risk factors.
• Seek medical care at the onset of any hand symptoms.
• Reduce the risk of hand injury at work. Take frequent breaks. Learn ways to do the work with less stress on the hands and wrists. Use good posture. Relax the grip. Keep hands warm. Perform hand and wrist exercises.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
With treatment and time, most people will recover completely.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
If the condition is severe and untreated, permanent damage in the hand may occur.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider will examine your hand and wrist. Questions will be asked about your symptoms and daily activities. Medical tests may be done to see how well the median nerve is functioning or to check for an underlying disorder.
• Treatment for any underlying condition will be prescribed. Conservative treatment for the carpal tunnel symptoms is usually tried first. Surgery is an option.
• Activities that are causing your symptoms need to be changed or stopped if at all possible.
• Rest the affected hand and wrist for 2 weeks (or as advised). Use ice or warm and cold soaks if they help with symptoms.
• Wearing a splint on the affected wrist for 4 to 6 weeks may be advised. The splint can keep the wrist in a neutral position at rest. Splints may be worn at night, during the day, or both day and night.
• Surgery to free the pinched nerve may be needed. The procedure may be done as an outpatient. Physical therapy will then help rebuild wrist strength.

MEDICATIONS

• You may take aspirin or ibuprofen to reduce pain and inflammation.
• Anti-inflammatory drugs or cortisone injections at the wrist to reduce inflammation may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY
Once symptoms get better, begin a routine of both aerobic and weight-training exercise to improve fitness.

DIET
Eat a normal, well-balanced diet. A weight loss diet is recommended if overweight is a problem.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome.
• Symptoms don’t improve in 2 weeks after treatment.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

SINDROME DEL TUNEL CARPIANO (Carpal Tunnel Syndrome) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
El síndrome del túnel carpiano es un trastorno neurológico común que afecta las manos y las muñecas. El túnel carpiano es un corredor como un túnel y está ubicado en el lado palmar de la muñeca. Está compuesto de ligamentos y huesos. Rodea al nervio mediano y a los tendones que van al pulgar y los dedos índice y medio. Generalmente afecta a los adultos y ocurre en las mujeres mucho más que en los hombres.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Los síntomas en general comienzan gradualmente y a menudo afectan al pulgar y a los dedos índice y medio. Generalmente la mano dominante es la primera en ser afectada.
• Hormigueo o entumecimiento en parte de la mano.
• Dolor punzante que se dispara desde la muñeca hacia arriba en el brazo, especialmente durante la noche.
• Sensación de ardor en los dedos.
• Rigidez o calambres de las manos en la mañana.
• Debilidad en el pulgar.
• Imposibilidad de cerrar el puño.

CAUSAS
A menudo es el resultado de una combinación de factores que aumentan la presión sobre el nervio mediano y los tendones en el túnel car-piano. El nervio mediano se irrita, lo que conduce a los síntomas de la mano.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Los tipos de trabajo que causan estrés sobre la muñeca (p. ej., tareas repetitivas, vibraciones, etc.) pueden aumentar los riesgos. (Muchas personas desarrollan la condición independientemente del tipo de trabajo que hacen). Continúan las investigaciones sobre la relación del síndrome del túnel carpiano y el trabajo.
• Las mujeres (posiblemente debido al tamaño más pequeño del túnel carpiano).
• Ciertas condiciones médicas o físicas pueden aumentar el riesgo. Estas incluyen la artritis, diabetes, hipotiroidismo, alcoholismo, obesidad, menopausia, embarazo u otros.
• Lesiones de la muñeca, fractura, dislocación u otras condiciones que pueden inflamar la muñeca.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• No existen medidas preventivas específicas.
• Obtenga atención médica para cualquier factor de riesgo.
• Busque atención médica al comienzo de cualquier síntoma en las manos.
• Reduzca el riesgo de lesiones en la mano en el trabajo. Tome descansos frecuentes. Aprenda cómo hacer su trabajo poniendo menos estrés sobre las manos y muñecas. Mantenga una buena postura. Relaje el agarro. Mantenga las manos tibias. Realice ejercicios para las manos y muñecas.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Con el tratamiento y el tiempo, la mayoría de las personas se recuperan completamente.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Si la condición es grave y no se trata, se puede producir daño permanente en la mano.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de salud le examinara la mano y la muñeca. Se le harán preguntas sobre sus síntomas y actividades cotidianas. Se le podrán hacer pruebas clínicas para determinar cuán bien funciona el nervio mediano o si hay un trastorno subyacente.
• Se le prescribirá un tratamiento para cualquier condición subyacente. Generalmente, en primer lugar se prueba un tratamiento conservativo para los síntomas del túnel carpiano. La cirugía es una opción.
• Es necesario cambiar o dejar de hacer las actividades que producen sus síntomas.
• Descanse la mano afectada y la muñeca por 2 semanas (o como se le indique). Use hielo o remojos en agua tibia o fría si ayudan con los síntomas.
• Se le puede recomendar el uso de una tablilla en la muñeca afectada de 4 a 6 semanas. La tablilla puede mantener la muñeca en descanso en una posición neutral. Se puede usar la tablilla en la noche, durante el día, o tanto durante el día como en la noche.
• Puede ser necesario llevar a cabo cirugía para liberar al nervio afectado. El procedimiento puede ser realizado como paciente ambulatorio. La fisioterapia le ayudará a continuación a restaurar la fuerza de la muñeca.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Usted puede tomar aspirina o ibuprofeno para reducir el dolor y la inflamación.
• Se le pueden prescribir medicamentos antiinflamatorios o inyecciones de cortisona en la muñeca para reducir la inflamación.

ACTIVIDAD
Una vez que los síntomas mejoren, empiece una rutina de ejercicios aeróbicos y levantamiento de pesas para mejorar el estado físico.

DIETA
Consuma una dieta normal, bien balanceada. Se le recomienda una dieta para perder peso si el sobrepeso es un problema.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de síndrome del túnel carpiano.
• Los síntomas no mejoran en 2 semanas después del tratamiento.
• Se desarrollan síntomas nuevos inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

CATARACT

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
A cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye. The lens is a clear, flexible structure near the front of the eyeball. It helps to keep vision in focus and screens and refracts light. Cataracts may form in one or both eyes. If they form in both eyes, their growth rate may be very different. They can take several months or several years to develop. They do not spread from one eye to the other. Cataracts occur most often in older adults.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Blurred vision. It may be worse in bright light. The blurring may first become apparent while driving at night, when lights seem to scatter or have halos.
• Difficulty reading.
• Faded colors.
• Poor night vision.
• Double or multiple vision.
• Opaque, milky-white pupil (advanced stages only).
• Frequent changes in prescription for eyeglasses.

CAUSES

• The lens of the eye is made up of water and protein. The protein is arranged in a certain way that keeps the lens clear and lets light pass through it. A cataract forms when some of the protein clumps together and begin to cloud a small area of the lens. Over time, it grows larger and affects vision.
• Congenital (present at birth) cataracts can occur.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Natural aging.
• Illnesses with high blood sugar, such as diabetes.
• Prolonged exposure to sunlight.
• Chronic eye disease.
• Exposure to some types of radiation.
• Family history of cataracts.
• Smoking.
• Use of steroid drugs.
• Surgery for other eye problems.
• Injury to the eye (cataract can occur years later).

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
No specific preventive measures. Getting medical care for eye disorders, wearing sunglasses (that filter UV light) outside during the day, and not smoking may help reduce the risk or delay cataract development. Research is ongoing for methods to prevent cataracts (e.g., use of antioxidants such as vitamin C).

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
Some cataracts never impair vision enough to require surgery. During the time cataracts are forming, frequent eyeglass changes may help vision. Cataracts that cause vision problems can be cured with surgery.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Loss of vision.
• Postsurgery complications. These include inflammation, infections, bleeding, loss of vision, and light flashes. These can usually be treated successfully.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Cataracts are usually diagnosed with an exam done by an eye doctor (ophthalmologist).
• Treatment depends on amount of vision problems. Surgery to remove the cataracts is the only cure.
• If vision is not too badly affected, wear eyeglasses that provide maximum benefit. Wear sunglasses during the day for outside activities. Use a magnifying glass to read if needed. Improve the lighting in your home.
• Surgery to remove cataracts is recommended if vision loss interferes with daily activities, such as reading, watching television, or driving.
• Surgery may be done on an inpatient or outpatient basis. Usually one eye is operated on at a time (if cataracts are in both eyes). The eye lens is usually removed and replaced with an artificial lens. Different types of surgery are available. Your options will be explained to you. After surgery, you will be given instructions for home care.

MEDICATIONS
Eye drops or drugs taken by mouth may be prescribed after your surgery.

ACTIVITY
No limits. Don’t drive at night if your vision is poor.

DIET
Eat a healthy diet with plenty of fruits and green, leafy vegetables. It helps overall health and may be helpful in preventing cataracts.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF
(Or notify your eye care provider).
• You or a family member has symptoms of cataracts.
• Any eye symptoms develop after cataract surgery.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

CATARATAS (Cataract) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Las cataratas son una opacidad del cristalino del ojo. El cristalino del ojo es una estructura flexible y trasparente situada cerca de la parte delantera del globo ocular. Ayuda a enfocar la vista y a filtrar y refractar los rayos de luz. Las cataratas pueden formarse en uno o ambos ojos. Si aparecen en ambos ojos, la rapidez con que se desarrollan puede variar bastante. Pueden tomar varios meses o años para desarrollarse. Estas no se transmiten de un ojo al otro. Las cataratas ocurren más frecuentemente en las personas mayores.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Visión turbia que puede empeorarse ante luces brillantes. Al principio la turbidez puede surgir al manejar de noche, dando la impresión de que las luces se dispersan o tienen halos.
• Dificultad para leer.
• Colores desgastados.
• Visión pobre en la noche.
• Visión doble o múltiple.
• Pupila opaca, de color blanco-lechoso (solamente en etapas avanzadas).
• Cambios frecuentes en la receta de los anteojos.

CAUSAS

• El cristalino del ojo está formado de agua y proteína. La proteína está arreglada de cierta manera que mantiene el cristalino claro y permite que luz pase a través de él. Una catarata se forma cuando la proteína se acumula y comienza a opacar una pequeña área del cristalino. Con el pasar del tiempo, esta crece y afecta la visión.
• Pueden ocurrir cataratas congénitas (presentes desde el nacimiento).

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Proceso natural de envejecimiento.
• Enfermedades relacionadas con el azúcar alto en la sangre, tales como la diabetes.
• Exposición prolongada a los rayos del sol.
• Enfermedad crónica de los ojos.
• Exposición a ciertos tipos de radiación.
• Antecedentes familiares de cataratas.
• Fumar.
• Uso de medicamentos esteroides.
• Cirugía para otros problemas en los ojos.
• Lesión en el ojo (las cataratas pueden ocurrir años después).

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
No hay medidas preventivas específicas. Obtener cuidado médico para los trastornos de los ojos, usar gafas para el sol (con filtro para la luz ultravioleta) cuando esté afuera durante el día y no fumar puede ayudar a reducir el riesgo o retrasar el desarrollo de las cataratas. Las investigaciones continúan en busca de métodos para prevenir las cataratas (p. ej., uso de antioxidantes como la vitamina C).

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Algunas cataratas no deterioran la visión lo suficiente como para necesitar cirugía. Mientras las cataratas se están formando, un cambio frecuente de los anteojos puede ayudar a la visión. Las cataratas que causan problemas con la visión pueden ser curadas con cirugía.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Pérdida de la visión.
• Complicaciones después de la cirugía. éstas pueden incluir inflamación, infecciones, sangrado, pérdida de la visión y destellos de luz. Generalmente estas pueden tratarse exitosamente.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Generalmente las cataratas son diagnosticadas por un examen de los ojos por un especialista de ojos (oftalmólogo).
• El tratamiento depende del grado de los problemas de visión. Cirugía para extirpar las cataratas es la única cura.
• Si la visión no está demasiado deteriorada, use anteojos que proporcionen beneficios máximos. Use anteojos para el sol durante el día cuando haga actividades en el exterior. Si es necesario, use una lupa para leer. Mejore la iluminación en su hogar.
• Se recomienda la cirugía para remover las cataratas si la pérdida de la visión interfiere con las actividades diarias, como el leer, ver televisión y manejar.
• La operación puede hacerse con hospitalización o como paciente ambulatorio. Generalmente se opera un ojo a la vez (si tiene cataratas en ambos ojos). Por lo general se remueven el cristalino del ojo y se reemplaza con un cristalino artificial. Hay diferentes tipos de cirugías disponibles. Le explicarán sus opciones. Después de la cirugía le darán instrucciones para el autocuidado.

MEDICAMENTOS
Se pueden recetar gotas para los ojos o medicamentos orales para después de la cirugía.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin restricciones. No maneje de noche si no ve bien.

DIETA
Consuma una dieta saludable con abundancia de frutas y verduras de hojas verdes. Eso ayuda a la salud en general y puede ser de ayuda en la prevención de las cataratas.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI
(O consulte a su proveedor de cuidado de los ojos)

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de cataratas.
• Se desarrollan síntomas en los ojos después de la cirugía para las cataratas.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

CELIAC DISEASE (Gluten Enteropathy; Non-Tropical Sprue)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Celiac disease is a digestive disorder that damages the intestines and prevents the body from getting nutrients from food. It occurs when foods that contain gluten, a protein found in grains (wheat, rye, and barley), cause an immune reaction in the body. Symptoms may begin at any age in a child or an adult. Symptoms often start during infancy or early childhood after the child begins eating food with gluten. In adults, symptoms may develop gradually over months or even years.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Symptoms vary from person to person and from one episode to another.
• Weight loss or slowed weight gain in an infant following the introduction of cereal to the diet.
• Poor appetite. Weight loss in older children or adults.
• Loose, pale, bulky, bad-smelling stools; frequent gas.
• Swollen abdomen; stomach pain. Muscle cramps.
• Mouth ulcers.
• Anemia or vitamin deficiency, with fatigue, pale skin, skin rash, or bone pain.
• Mildly bowed legs in children.
• Vague tiredness and weakness. Swollen legs.
• Irritability, depression, or anxiety.
• Adults tend to have fewer of the digestive symptoms and more of other, general types of symptoms.

CAUSES
The exact cause is unknown. It is an autoimmune disorder because the body’s own immune system causes the damage to the lining of the small intestine. A person inherits the tendency to get celiac disease.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Family history of celiac disease. A person’s risk is about 10% if a first-degree relative has celiac disease.
• The disease may be triggered, or becomes active, after surgery, with pregnancy or childbirth, a viral infection, or severe emotional stress.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Cannot be prevented at present.
• Continuing to breast-feed at the time cereal is first given to an infant appears to reduce the risk.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
With a strict, gluten-free diet, most persons with celiac disease can expect a normal life. Improvement of symptoms begins in 2 to 3 weeks.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• If untreated, malnutrition and anemia can occur.
• Celiac disease patients are more likely to have other autoimmune disorders, diabetes, dermatitis herpetiformis, certain cancers, and other medical problems.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider may do a physical exam and ask questions about your symptoms and diet. Medical tests may include blood, urine, and stool studies. A biopsy may be done (small sample of tissue is taken from the small intestine for viewing under a microscope). Sometimes, diagnosis is based on a person going on a gluten-free diet to see if the symptoms stop.
• The only treatment is a gluten-free diet.
• To learn more: Celiac Sprue Association, PO Box 31700, Omaha, NE 68131; (877) 272-4272; website: www.csaceliacs.org or Celiac Disease Foundation, 13251 Ventura Blvd., Studio City, CA 91604; (818) 990-2354 (not toll free); website: www.celiac.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Iron and folic acid for anemia may be prescribed.
• Calcium and multiple-vitamin supplements for deficiencies may be recommended.
• Cortisone drugs to reduce the body’s inflammatory response may be prescribed.

ACTIVITY
No limits.

DIET
Gluten-free diet. Gluten is found in wheat, rye, barley, and possibly oats. It is difficult to exclude gluten from the diet completely. Be patient while becoming familiar with the diet. A dietitian can help you with a diet plan.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or your child has symptoms of celiac disease.
• Symptoms don’t decrease after 3 weeks of eating a gluten-free diet.
• Symptoms recur after they have been absent.
• The child fails to regain lost weight or grow and develop as expected.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ENFERMEDAD CELIACA (Celiaquia; Intolerancia al Gluten; Esprue no Tropical) (Celiac Disease [Gluten Enteropathy; Non-Tropical Sprue]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La enfermedad celíaca es un trastorno digestivo que daña los intestinos y previene que el cuerpo absorba nutrientes de los alimentos. Esto ocurre cuando alimentos que contienen gluten, una proteína que se encuentra en los granos (trigo, centeno y cebada), causan una reacción inmunológica en el cuerpo. Los síntomas pueden comenzar a cualquier edad en un niño o en un adulto. Los síntomas a menudo comienzan durante la infancia o niñez temprana, después que el niño comienza a consumir alimentos con gluten. En los adultos, los síntomas se pueden desarrollar gradualmente en el curso de meses o incluso años.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Los síntomas varían de persona a persona y de un episodio a otro.
• Pérdida de peso o poco aumento de peso en infantes después de la introducción de cereal en la dieta.
• Falta de apetito. Pérdida de peso en niños mayores o adultos.
• Excremento blando, claro, voluminoso, maloliente; gas frecuente.
• Abdomen hinchado; dolor de estómago. Retortijones de los músculos.
• Ulceras en la boca.
• Anemia o deficiencia vitamínica, con fatiga, piel pálida, erupción cutánea o dolor en los huesos.
• Piernas un poco arqueadas.
• Fatiga y debilidad vagas. Piernas hinchadas.
• Irritabilidad, depresión o ansiedad.
• Los adultos tienden a tener menos síntomas digestivos y más de los otros tipos generales de síntomas.

CAUSAS
Se desconoce la causa exacta. Es un trastorno autoinmune porque el propio sistema inmunológico del cuerpo causa el daño al revestimiento del intestino delgado. Una persona hereda la tendencia a sufrir de la enfermedad celíaca.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Antecedentes familiares de enfermedad celíaca. El riesgo de una persona es de alrededor del 10% si un pariente de primer grado tiene la enfermedad celíaca.
• La enfermedad puede ser desencadenada, o activarse, después de una cirugía, con un embarazo o parto, una infección viral o estrés emocional intenso.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• En la actualidad, no puede prevenirse.
• Continuar dándole el pecho cuando se le empieza a dar cereal a un infante parece reducir el riesgo.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Con una dieta estricta y libre de gluten, la mayoría de las personas con enfermedad celíaca pueden esperar una vida normal. La mejoría de los síntomas comienza en 2 a 3 semanas.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Sin tratamiento, puede ocasionar desnutrición y anemia.
• Los pacientes con la enfermedad celíaca tienen más probabilidad de tener otros trastornos autoinmunes, diabetes, dermatitis herpetiforme, ciertos cánceres y otros problemas médicos.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica le puede hacer un examen físico y le hará preguntas acerca de sus síntomas y su dieta. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir análisis de sangre, orina y excreta. Se puede hacer una biopsia (se toma una pequeña muestra de tejido del intestino delgado para examinarse bajo el microscopio). A veces, el diagnóstico está basado en hacer que el paciente siga una dieta libre de gluten para ver si los síntomas desaparecen.
• El único tratamiento es una dieta libre de gluten.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: Celiac Sprue Association, P.O. Box 31700, Omaha, NE 68131; (877) 272-4272; sitio web: www.csaceliacs.org . O Celiac Disease Foundation, 13251 Ventura Blvd., Studio City, CA 91604, (818) 990-2354 (no es llamada libre), sitio web: www.celiac.org .

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se puede recetar hierro y ácido fólico para la anemia.
• Se puede recomendar calcio y suplementos multivitamínicos para las deficiencias.
• Se pueden recetar medicamentos de cortisona para reducir la respuesta inflamatoria del cuerpo.

ACTIVIDAD
Sin restricciones.

DIETA
Dieta libre de gluten. El gluten se encuentra en el trigo, el centeno, la cebada, y posiblemente la avena. Es difícil eliminar el gluten completamente de la dieta. Tenga paciencia mientras se familiariza con la dieta. Un nutricionista puede ayudarle con su plan.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o su niño tiene síntomas de enfermedad celíaca.
• Los síntomas no mejoran después de 3 semanas de estar consumiendo una dieta libre de gluten.
• Los síntomas retornan después de haber estado ausentes.
• El niño no recupera el peso perdido o no crece ni se desarrolla como es de esperar.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

CELLULITIS (Erysipelas)

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Cellulitis is an inflammation of the skin and the tissues just below the skin (subcutaneous). It is most likely to occur on the face, arms, lower legs, and anal area. It can affect all age groups, including children.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Tenderness, warmth, swelling, and redness in an area of the skin. A thin red line may extend from the area toward the heart. Fluid or pus may leak out.
• Fever, chills, sweating, and a general ill feeling.
• Lymph glands nearest the area may be swollen.

CAUSES
Infection with bacteria, or rarely, a fungal infection. It can begin with a minor injury to the skin that is invaded by the bacteria. The infection leads to inflammation, which is the body’s response to infection. Cellulitis cannot be passed from one person to another.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Chronic illness, such as diabetes.
• Weak immune system due to illness or drugs.
• Any injury that breaks the skin.
• Use of drugs by injection.
• Burns.
• Surgical wound infection.
• Skin disorders (eczema or psoriasis) or infections that cause skin symptoms, such as chickenpox.
• Poor blood circulation.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

• Keep the skin clean.
• Avoid skin damage. Use protective clothing or proper gear for work or sports where injuries may occur.
• Wear shoes that fit well. Avoid going barefoot in areas where there may be risk of injury.
• If the skin is injured, wash the area with soap and water. Check the injured skin for the next few days to make sure it is healing. If not, seek medical care.
• Avoid swimming if you have any sores on your skin.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
With treatment, symptoms will begin to improve in 2 to 3 days, and complete recovery occurs in 7 to 10 days. Complications are rare, but may develop in those with chronic disease or weak immune systems.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS

• Blood poisoning, if bacteria enter the bloodstream.
• Brain infection, if the condition occurs on the central part of the face.
• Infection of the bone, muscle, and tissue beneath the affected areas.
• Vein or lymph gland inflammation.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your health care provider can usually diagnose the disorder by a physical exam of the affected area. Medical tests may include blood tests and study of a sample of fluid removed from the affected skin.
• Treatment is with drugs for the infection, rest, and hospital care, if needed.
• Soak the area in warm water to help it heal. This may also reduce pain and swelling.
• Elevate the affected area. Rest the arm or leg on a pillow. Don’t move that area of your body unless you have to. This can help reduce swelling.
• If too much fluid is lost from the skin, you may need hospital care. Replacement fluids will be given through a tube into a vein under the skin.

MEDICATIONS

• Antibiotics will be prescribed for infection. They may be taken by mouth or injection. Complete the entire dose prescribed, even if symptoms disappear quickly.
• Use acetaminophen or ibuprofen for minor pain and fever.

ACTIVITY
Get extra rest until symptoms improve. Then return to your normal level of activity.

DIET
No special diet.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You or a family member has symptoms of cellulitis.
• The following occur during treatment:
– High fever and chills.
– Pain, redness, or swelling increases.
– Red streaks continue to extend, despite treatment.
– Vomiting.
• New, unexplained symptoms develop. Drugs used in treatment may produce side effects.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

ERISIPELA (Cellulitis [Erysipelas]) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
La erisipela es una inflamación de la piel y de los tejidos justo debajo de la piel (subcutáneos). Es más común en la cara, los brazos, la parte baja de las piernas y el área del ano. Puede afectar a personas de todas las edades, incluyendo los niños.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Hipersensibilidad, calor, hinchazón y enrojecimiento en el área de la piel. Una fina línea roja puede extenderse del área afectada hacia el corazón. Puede tener secreciones de fluidos o pus.
• Fiebre, escalofríos, transpiración y sensación de malestar general.
• Las glándulas linfáticas cerca del área afectada pueden estar inflamadas.

CAUSAS
Infección bacteriana o, rara vez, una infección por hongos. Puede comenzar con una lesión leve en la piel que es infectada por bacterias. La infección conduce a la inflamación, la cual es la respuesta del cuerpo a la infección. La erisipela no puede ser transmitida de una persona a otra.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Enfermedades crónicas, tales como diabetes.
• Sistema inmunológico débil debido a una enfermedad o medicamentos.
• Cualquier lesión que rasgue la piel.
• Uso de medicamentos inyectables.
• Quemaduras.
• Infección de una herida quirúrgica.
• Trastornos de la piel (eccema o psoriasis) o infecciones que causan síntomas en la piel, tales como varicela.
• Circulación sanguínea pobre.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS

• Mantenga la piel limpia.
• Evite lastimarse la piel. Use ropa o equipos protectores para trabajos o deportes donde lesiones pueden ocurrir.
• Use zapatos que le calcen bien. Evite caminar descalzo en áreas donde puede estar en riesgo de lesiones.
• Si la piel es lesionada, lávese el área con agua y jabón. Inspeccione la piel lesionada por los próximos días para asegurarse que está sanando. Si no, busque cuidado médico.
• Evite nadar si tiene cualquier úlcera en la piel.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
Con tratamiento, los síntomas comenzarán a sanar en 2 a 3 días y la recuperación total ocurrirá en 7 a 10 días. Las complicaciones son raras, pero pueden aparecer en personas con enfermedades crónicas o sistemas inmunológicos débiles.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES

• Envenenamiento de la sangre, si la bacteria entra en la corriente sanguínea.
• Infección cerebral, si el trastorno ocurre en la parte central de la cara.
• Infección en el hueso, músculo y tejido debajo de las áreas afectadas.
• Inflamación de una vena o una glándula linfática.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• Su proveedor de atención médica generalmente puede diagnosticar el trastorno examinando el área afectada. Los exámenes médicos pueden incluir análisis de sangre y un estudio de fluidos extraídos de la piel afectada.
• El tratamiento es con medicamentos para la infección, descanso y hospitalización, si es necesario.
• Remoje el área en agua tibia para ayudar a la curación. Esto también puede ayudar a reducir el dolor y la hinchazón.
• Eleve el área afectada. Descanse el brazo o la pierna en una almohada. No mueva el área del cuerpo a menos que tenga que hacerlo. Esto puede ayudar a reducir la hinchazón.
• Si pierde mucho fluido por la piel, puede que necesite hospita-lización. Se efectuará el reemplazo de los fluidos a través de un tubo dentro de una vena debajo de la piel.

MEDICAMENTOS

• Se recetarán antibióticos para la infección. éstos pueden administrarse por boca o inyección. Complete la dosis recetada, incluso si los síntomas desaparecen rápidamente.
• Use paracetamol o ibuprofeno para dolores leves y fiebre.

ACTIVIDAD
Obtenga descanso adicional hasta que los síntomas mejoren. Luego regrese a su nivel normal de actividades.

DIETA
Ninguna en especial
AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted o un miembro de su familia tiene síntomas de erisipela.
• Durante el tratamiento ocurre lo siguiente:
– Fiebre alta y escalofríos.
– El dolor, enrojecimiento o hinchazón aumentan.
– Estrías rojas que siguen extendiéndose, a pesar del tratamiento.
– Vómitos.
• Se presentan síntomas nuevos e inexplicables. Los medicamentos usados en el tratamiento pueden producir efectos secundarios.
NOTAS ESPECIALES:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
Notas adicionales al dorso de esta página

CEREBRAL PALSY

BASIC INFORMATION

DESCRIPTION
Cerebral palsy (CP) refers to a group of life-long disorders that affect muscle movement and body coordination. Cerebral refers to the brain and palsy refers to a disorder of movement. Most children with cerebral palsy are born with it, but symptoms may not appear for months or years. The number and severity of the symptoms and vary widely among children with CP.

FREQUENT SIGNS & SYMPTOMS

• Drooling, difficulty with sucking or swallowing.
• Lack of normal muscle tone (floppy).
• Slow development (holding head up, turning over, crawling, sitting, reaching with hand, walking, talking).
• Unusual body postures, stiffness, muscle spasms, and uncontrolled and abnormal body movements.
• Poor coordination or balance.
• Impaired hearing, vision, or speech. Crossed eyes.
• Convulsions (seizures).
• Dental problems.
• Bowel and bladder control problems.
• Normal or above normal intelligence or degrees of mental retardation.

CAUSES
Damage to motor areas of the brain that disrupts its ability to adequately control movement and posture. The reason for the damage is often unknown. In most cases, the damage occurs before birth, but it can occur during or after childbirth. Cerebral palsy is not inherited.

RISK INCREASES WITH

• Prematurity and low birthweight.
• Breech birth, multiple births (e.g., twins), complicated labor and delivery, maternal bleeding late in pregnancy, or mother exposed to toxins during pregnancy.
• Birth injury, including severe oxygen shortage.
• Congenital malformation of the nervous system.
• Severe jaundice in an infant.
• Rh incompatibility (a blood disorder).
• Stroke in a fetus or newborn, or seizures in newborn.
• Low Apgar score (a rating scale done on newborns).
• An infection in the mother during pregnancy, such as rubella (German measles), toxoplasmosis, and others.
• Mothers who have thyroid problems, seizure disorder, mental retardation, or drug and alcohol abuse.
• Brain disease (meningitis or encephalitis) in infant.
• Head injuries during infancy or childhood.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES
Get treatment for, or avoid, preventable risk factors. Get good medical care during pregnancy and don’t smoke, use alcohol, or abuse drugs. Protect infants from accidents or injuries.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES
It is not progressive and children will vary widely in the severity of the condition. A child with CP may have high intelligence despite major muscular disability. Those with less-severe impairment can lead relatively normal, productive lives. Children with severe impairments may require special care.

POSSIBLE COMPLICATIONS
Joint deformities; problems with nutrition, speech, vision, or hearing; mental retardation; or seizures.

DIAGNOSIS & TREATMENT

GENERAL MEASURES

• Your child’s health care provider will do a physical exam. Medical tests include testing motor skills and reflexes. Tests are also done to rule out other disorders.
• You and your child’s health care team will decide on a program of care based on your child’s special needs. The program will change over time as the child matures and the needs change.
• The program can include drug therapy, physical therapy, occupational and speech therapy, behavior therapy, and emotional help. Braces, casts, mechanical aids, hearing aids, and surgery help some specific problems.
• Parents often join a support group to seek help.
• To learn more: United Cerebral Palsy Foundation, 1660 L St. NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036; (800) 872-5827; website: www.ucp.org .

MEDICATIONS

• Drugs may be prescribed to ease spasticity, to reduce abnormal movements, for seizures, or other problems.
• Stool softeners can be used for constipation.

ACTIVITY
Limits or abilities will depend on degree of impairment.

DIET
Eating and swallowing may be difficult. Special diets and feeding techniques may be needed.

NOTIFY OUR OFFICE IF

• You are concerned about your child’s development or suspect cerebral palsy.
• After diagnosis, you have concerns about your child.
Special notes:
________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
More notes on the back of this page

PARALISIS CEREBRAL (Cerebral Palsy) (Spanish)

INFORMACION BASICA

DESCRIPCION
Parálisis cerebral (o CP, por sus siglas en inglés) se refiere a un grupo de trastornos que duran toda la vida y que afectan los movimientos musculares y la coordinación del cuerpo. Cerebral se refiere al cerebro y parálisis se refiere al trastorno del movimiento. La mayoría de los niños con parálisis cerebral han nacido con esta condición, pero puede que los síntomas no se manifiesten por meses o años. El número y la gravedad de los síntomas varían ampliamente entre los niños afectados.

SIGNOS & SINTOMAS FRECUENTES

• Babeo, dificultad al chupar o al tragar.
• Falta de tono muscular normal (músculos blandos).
• Desarrollo lento (mantener la cabeza erguida, darse vuelta, gatear, sentarse, alcanzar con la mano, caminar, hablar).
• Posturas del cuerpo poco comunes, rigidez, espasmos musculares y movimientos corporales incontrolables y anormales.
• Coordinación o equilibrio pobre.
• Visión, audición o habla deteriorada. Ojos bizcos.
• Convulsiones (ataques).
• Inteligencia normal, por encima de lo normal o diversos grados de retardación mental.

CAUSAS
Daño a las áreas motoras del cerebro que perturban su habilidad de controlar adecuadamente los movimientos y la postura. La razón del daño frecuentemente es desconocida. En la mayoría de los casos, el daño ocurre antes del nacimiento, pero puede ocurrir durante o después del parto. La parálisis cerebral no es hereditaria.

EL RIESGO AUMENTA CON

• Nacimiento prematuro y poco peso de nacimiento.
• Parto de nalgas, parto múltiple (gemelos), labor y parto complicados, sangrado maternal tarde en el embarazo, o la madre estuvo expuesta a toxinas durante el embarazo.
• Lesión al nacer, incluyendo una severa escasez de oxigeno.
• Deformación congénita del sistema nervioso.
• Ictericia grave en un infante.
• Incompatibilidad de Rh (un trastorno de la sangre).
• Apoplejía del feto o recién nacido, o convulsiones en el recién nacido.
• Puntuación baja en la escala de Apgar (una escala hecha en los recién nacidos).
• Una infección en la madre durante el embarazo, tal como la rubeola, toxoplasmosis y otras.
• Madres que tienen problemas de la tiroides, trastornos de convulsiones, retardación mental o abuso de drogas y alcohol.
• Enfermedad cerebral (meningitis o encefalitis) en el infante.
• Lesiones en la cabeza durante la infancia o la niñez.

MEDIDAS PREVENTIVAS
Obtenga tratamiento o evite los factores de riesgo prevenibles. Obtenga cuidado médico durante el embarazo y no fume, no use al-cohol ni abuse de drogas. Proteja a los infantes de accidentes o lesiones.

RESULTADOS ESPERADOS
No es progresiva y los niños variarán ampliamente en la severidad de su condición. Un niño con parálisis cerebral puede tener inteligencia alta a pesar de su incapacidad muscular mayor. Aquellos con menos impe-dimentos pueden llevar una vida productiva y relativamente normal. Los niños con impedimentos severos pueden requerir cuidado especial.

COMPLICACIONES POSIBLES
Deformidades articulares, problemas con la nutrición, habla, visión o audición; retardación mental o convulsiones.

DIAGNOSIS & TRATAMIENTO

MEDIDAS GENERALES

• El proveedor de atención médica del niño le hará un examen físico. Los exámenes médicos incluyen probar las destrezas motoras y los reflejos. También se harán exámenes para descartar otros trastornos.
• Usted y el proveedor de atención médica del niño decidirán acerca del programa de cuidado basándose en las necesidades especiales del niño. El programa cambiará a través del tiempo a medida que el niño madura y las necesidades cambian.
• El programa puede incluir terapia de medicamentos, terapia física, terapia ocupacional y del habla, terapia de comportamiento y ayuda emocional. Los aparatos de ortodoncia, yesos, aparatos ortopédicos, aparatos para escuchar y cirugía pueden ayudar algunos problemas específicos.
• Los padres frecuentemente se unen a grupos de apoyo para conseguir ayuda.
• Para obtener más información, diríjase a: United Cerebral Palsy Foundation, 1660 L. St. NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036; (800) 872-5827; sitio web: www.ucp.org .

MEDICAMENTOS
Se pueden recetar medicamentos para aliviar la espasticidad, reducir los movimientos anormales, ataques de convulsiones u otros problemas. Se pueden usar laxantes para el estreñimiento.

ACTIVIDAD
Los límites o habilidades dependerán del grado de incapacidad.

DIETA
El comer y tragar puede ser difícil. Pueden requerirse dietas y técnicas alimenticias especiales.

AVISENOS AL CONSULTORIO SI

• Usted está preocupado acerca del desarrollo de su niño o sospecha par&