Horns and Beaks
270 pages
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270 pages
English

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Description

New findings on Triceratops, Iguanodon, and other related dinosaurs


Horns and Beaks completes Ken Carpenter's series on the major dinosaur types. As with his volumes on armored, carnivorous, and sauropodomorph dinosaurs, this book collects original and new information, reflecting the latest discoveries and research on these two groups of animals. The Ornithopods include Iguanodon, one of the first dinosaurs ever discovered and analyzed, and perhaps the most common and best-documented group, the hadrosaurs or "duckbilled dinosaurs." The Ceratopsians include Triceratops, known for its distinctive three-horned skull and protective collar.

Contributors are Michael K. Brett-Surman, Kathleen Brill, Kenneth Carpenter, Benjamin S. Creisler, Tony DiCroce, Andrew A. Farke, Peter M. Galton, David Gilpin, Thomas M. Lehman, Nate L. Murphy, Christopher J. Ott, Gregory S. Paul, Xabier Pereda Suberbiola, Albert Prieto-Marquez, Bruce Rothschild, José Ignacio Ruiz-Omeñaca, Darren H. Tanke, Mark Thompson, David Trexler, and Jonathan R. Wagner.


Contributors
Preface
Acknowledgments

I. Beaked Dinosaurs: The Ornithopods
1. Callovosaurus leedsi, the Earliest Dryosaurid Dinosaur (Ornithischia: Euornithopoda) from the Middle Jurassic of England
José Ignacio Ruiz-Omeñaca, Xabier Pereda Suberbiola, and Peter M. Galton
2. Teeth of Ornithischian Dinosaurs (Mostly Ornithopoda) from the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) of the Western United States
Peter M. Galton
3. A Description of a New Ornithopod from the Lytle Member of the Purgatoire Formation (Lower Cretaceous) and a Reassessment of the Skull of Camptosaurus
Kathleen Brill and Kenneth Carpenter
4. Turning the Old into the New: A Separate Genus for the Gracile Iguanodont from the Wealden of England
Gregory S. Paul
5. A Possible New Basal Hadrosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation of Eastern Utah
David Gilpin, Tony DiCroce, and Kenneth Carpenter
6. Postcranial Osteology of the Hadrosaurid Dinosaur Brachylophosaurus canadensis from the Late Cretaceous of Montana
Albert Prieto-Marquez
7. "Leonardo," a Mummified Brachylophosaurus (Ornithischia: Hadrosauridae) from the Judith River Formation of Montana
Nate L. Murphy, David Trexler, and Mark Thompson
8. Discussion of Character Analysis of the Appendicular Anatomy in Campanian and Maastrichtian North American Hadrosaurids—Variation and Ontogeny
Michael K. Brett-Surman and Jonathan R. Wagner
9. Osteochondrosis in Late Cretaceous Hadrosauria: A Manifestation of Ontologic Failure
Bruce Rothschild and Darren H. Tanke
10. Deciphering Duckbills: A History in Nomenclature
Benjamin S. Creisler

II. Horned Dinosaurs: Ceratopsians
11. Cranial Anatomy and Biogeography of the First Leptoceratops gracilis (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) Specimens from the Hell Creek Formation, Southeast Montana
Christopher J. Ott
12. Cranial Osteology and Phylogenetic Relationships of the Chasmosaurine Ceratopsid Torosaurus latus
Andrew A. Farke
13. Growth and Population Age Structure in the Horned Dinosaur Chasmosaurus
Thomas M. Lehman
14. Bone Resorption, Bone Lesions, and Extracranial Fenestrae in Ceratopsid Dinosaurs: A Preliminary Assessment
Darren H. Tanke and Andrew A. Farke
15. "Bison" alticornis and O. C. Marsh's Early Views on Ceratopsians
Kenneth Carpenter

Index

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 14 novembre 2006
Nombre de lectures 0
EAN13 9780253027955
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 4 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0500€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Extrait

Horns and Beaks
LIFE OF THE PAST James O. Farlow, editor
Horns and Beaks
Ceratopsian and Ornithopod Dinosaurs
Edited by Kenneth Carpenter
INDIANA UNIVERSITY PRESS Bloomington and Indianapolis
This book is a publication of Indiana University Press 601 North Morton Street Bloommgton, IN 47404-3797 USA
http://iupress.indiana.edu
Telephone orders    800-842-6796 Vax orders              812-855-7931 Orders by e-mail     iuporder@indiana.edu
© 2007 by Indiana University Press
All rights reserved
No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. The Association of American University Presses’ Resolution on Permissions constitutes the only exception to this prohibition.
The paper used in this publication meets the minimum requirements of American National Standard for Information Sciences—Permanence of Paper for Printed Library Materials, ANSI Z39.48-1984.
Manufactured in the United States of America
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Horns and beaks : Ceratopsian and Ornithopod dinosaurs / edited by Kenneth Carpenter.           p. cm. — (Life of the past)     Includes bibliographical references and index.     ISBN 0-253-34817-X (cloth : alk. paper)   1. Ornithischia. 2. Ceratopsidae. I. Carpenter, Kenneth, 1949- II. Series.     QE862.O65H675 2007     567.914—dc22
2006016496
1 2 3 4 5 12 11 10 09 08 07
Contents
Contributors
Preface
Acknowledgments
PART ONE: Beaked Dinosaurs: The Ornithopods
1 • Callovosaurus leedsi , the Earliest Dryosaurid Dinosaur (Ornithischia: Euornithopoda) from the Middle Jurassic of England
José Ignacio Ruiz-Omeñaca, Xabier Pereda Suberbiola, and Peter M. Galton
2 • Teeth of Ornithischian Dinosaurs (Mostly Ornithopoda) from the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) of the Western United States
Peter M. Galton
3 • A Description of a New Ornithopod from the Lytle Member of the Purgatoire Formation (Lower Cretaceous) and a Reassessment of the Skull of Camptosaurus
Kathleen Brill and Kenneth Carpenter
4 • Turning the Old into the New: A Separate Genus for the Gracile Iguanodont from the Wealden of England
Gregory S. Paul
5 • A Possible New Basal Hadrosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation of Eastern Utah
David Gilpin, Tony DiCroce, and Kenneth Carpenter
6 • Postcranial Osteology of the Hadrosaurid Dinosaur Brachylophosaurus canadensis from the Late Cretaceous of Montana
Albert Prieto-Marquez
7 • “Leonardo,” a Mummified Brachylophosaurus (Ornithischia: Hadrosauridae) from the Judith River Formation of Montana
Nate L. Murphy, David Trexler, and Mark Thompson
8 • Discussion of Character Analysis of the Appendicular Anatomy in Campanian and Maastrichtian North American Hadrosaurids—Variation and Ontogeny
Michael K. Brett-Surman and Jonathan R. Wagner
9 • Osteochondrosis in Late Cretaceous Hadrosauria: A Manifestation of Ontologic Failure
Bruce Rothschild and Darren H. Tanke
10 • Deciphering Duckbills: A History in Nomenclature
Benjamin S. Creisler
PART TWO: Horned Dinosaurs: Ceratopsians
11 • Cranial Anatomy and Biogeography of the First Leptoceratops gracilis (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) Specimens from the Hell Creek Formation, Southeast Montana
Christopher J. Ott
12 • Cranial Osteology and Phylogenetic Relationships of the Chasmosaurine Ceratopsid Torosaurus latus
Andrew A. Farke
13 • Growth and Population Age Structure in the Horned Dinosaur Chasmosaurus
Thomas M. Lehman
14 • Bone Resorption, Bone Lesions, and Extracranial Fenestrae in Ceratopsid Dinosaurs: A Preliminary Assessment
Darren H. Tanke and Andrew A. Farke
15 • “ Bison “ alticornis and O. C. Marsh’s Early Views on Ceratopsians
Kenneth Carpenter
Index
Contributors
Michael K. Brett-Surman, Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, The Smithsonian Institution, 10th & Constitution Avenue, Washington, DC 20560 USA
Kathleen Brill, Department of Earth Sciences, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80205 USA
Kenneth Carpenter, Department of Earth Sciences, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80205 USA
Benjamin S. Creisler, 1705 Belmont 602, Seattle, WA 98122 USA
Tony DiCroce, Department of Earth Sciences, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80205 USA
Andrew A. Farke, Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, T8 040 Health Sciences Center, Stony Brook, NY 11794 USA
Peter M. Galton, College of Naturopathic Medicine, University of Bridgeport, Bridgeport, CT 06601 USA
David Gilpin, Department of Earth Sciences, Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver, CO 80205 USA
Thomas M. Lehman, Department of Geosciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 USA
Nate L. Murphy, Judith River Dinosaur Institute, P.O. Box 429, Malta, MT 59538 USA
Christopher J. Ott, University of Wisconsin-Madison Geology Museum, 1215 W Dayton St., Madison, WI 53706
Gregory S. Paul, 3109 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21218
Xabier Pereda Suberbiola, Universidad del País Vasco/EHU, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Departamento de Estratigrafía y Paleontología, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao, Spain
Albert Prieto-Marquez, Department of Biological Science, Conradi Building, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 USA
Bruce Rothschild, Arthritis Center of Northeast Ohio, 5500 Market St., Youngstown, OH 44512 USA
José Ignacio Ruiz-Omeñaca, Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra, Area de Paleontología, 59 Zaragoza, Spain
Darren H. Tanke, Dinosaur Research Program, Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology, Box 7500, Drumheller, Alberta T0J 0Y0 Canada
Mark Thompson, Judith River Dinosaur Institute, P.O. Box 429, Malta, MT 59538 USA
David Trexler, Two Medicine Dinosaur Center, P.O. Box 786, Bynum, MT 59419 USA
Jonathan R. Wagner, Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1100, Austin, TX 78712-0254 USA
Preface
The past decade has seen a considerable amount of research done on dinosaurs. Some of the most exciting of this work has been presented in this series by Indiana University Press: The Armored Dinosaurs (2001), Mesozoic Vertebrate Life (2001, edited with Darren Tanke), The Carnivorous Dinosaurs (2005), and Thunder-Lizards (2005, edited with Virginia Tidwell). This volume is the last in the series of edited volumes and deals with current research in ornithischian dinosaurs other than the armored ones. Horns and Beaks presents some historical insights as well as some descriptive studies. As before, I hope there is a little of something for everyone.
Acknowledgments
This last in the series on the latest research in dinosaurs was made possible by the support of Jim Farlow and Bob Sloan, Indiana University Press. Thanks to Karen Hellekson, copyeditor, and Miki Bird, managing editor at Indiana University Press.
Thanks also to the contributing authors for their patience.
Part One Beaked Dinosaurs: The Ornithopods
1. Callovosaurus leedsi , the Earliest Dryosaurid Dinosaur (Ornithischia: Euornithopoda) from the Middle Jurassic of England
J OSÉ I GNACIO R UIZ -O MEÑACA , X ABIER P EREDA S UBERBIOLA , AND P ETER M. G ALTON
Abstract
Callovosaurus leedsi (Lydekker 1889), based on an isolated femur from the Oxford Clay (Middle Jurassic, Callovian) of Peterborough, England, is reinterpreted as a dryosaurid. It represents the oldest record of this poorly known group of ornithopods. Callovosaurus was previously regarded variously as a hypsilophodontid, camptosaurid, or iguanodontid, but the femur shows a combination of characters typical of dryosaurids: bowed shaft; proximally placed pendant fourth trochanter; pit for insertion of the M. caudifemoralis longus well developed and separated from the fourth trochanter; and anterior intercondylar groove. Further, the concave excavation posteriorly proximal to medial condyle meets the medial surface of the distal end at a sharp edge, and the lateral condyle is transversely reduced with a rounded ledge lateral to it. Callovosaurus differs from Dryosaurus and Valdosaurus in the more expanded, transversely flattened anterior trochanter. Moreover, it differs from Valdosaurus in the shallow anterior intercondylar groove and the very slightly concave internal surface of the distal end.
Introduction
Lydekker (1889) described a left femur from the Oxford Clay near Peterborough, England as a new species of Camptosaurus, C. leedsi. In addition to the original (BMNH R1993; collection of Mr. A. N. Leeds, purchased in 1892), Lydekker (1890) also mentioned a cast of the femur (BMNH R1608, made in 1888). Gilmore (1909: 290) noted that C. leedsi is similar to Camptosaurus , but “if referable at all to an American genus, its closest affinities, as indicated by the femur, are with Dryosaurus .” Galton (1972, 1974) placed C. leedsi in the Hypsilophodontidae as being closely related to Dryosaurus Marsh 1894 and th

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