Dinosaur Tracks
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335 pages
English

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Description

The latest advances in dinosaur ichnology are showcased in this comprehensive and timely volume, in which leading researchers and research groups cover the most essential topics in the study of dinosaur tracks. Some assess and demonstrate state-of-the-art approaches and techniques, such as experimental ichnology, photogrammetry, biplanar X-rays, and a numerical scale for quantifying the quality of track preservation. The high diversity of these up-to-date studies underlines that dinosaur ichnological research is a vibrant field, that important discoveries are continuously made, and that new methods are being developed, applied, and refined. This indispensable volume unequivocally demonstrates that ichnology has an important contribution to make toward a better understanding of dinosaur paleobiology. Tracks and trackways are one of the best sources of evidence to understand and reconstruct the daily life of dinosaurs. They are windows on past lives, dynamic structures produced by living, breathing, moving animals now long extinct, and they are every bit as exciting and captivating as the skeletons of their makers.


Introduction / Peter L. Falkingham, Daniel Marty, and Annette Richter
Part I. Approaches and Techniques for Studying Dinosaur Tracks
1. Experimental and Comparative Ichnology / Jesper Milàn and Peter L. Falkingham
2. Close-Range Photogrammetry for 3D Ichnology: The Basics of Photogrammetric Ichnology / Neffra Matthews, Tommy Noble, and Brent Breithaupt
3. The Early Cretaceous Dinosaur Trackways in Münchehagen (Lower Saxony, Germany): 3D Photogrammetry as Basis for Geometric Morphometric Analysis of Shape Variation and Evaluation of Material Loss during Excavation / Oliver Wings, Jens N. Lallensack, and Heinrich Mallison
4. Applying Objective Methods to Subjective Track Outlines / Peter L. Falkingham
5. Beyond Surfaces: A Particle-Based Perspective on Track Formation / Stephen M. Gatesy and Richard G. Ellis
6. A Numerical Scale for Quantifying the Quality of Preservation of Vertebrate Tracks / Matteo Belvedere and James O. Farlow
7. Evaluating the Dinosaur Track Record: An Integrative Approach to Understanding the Regional and Global Distribution, Scientific Importance, Preservation and Management of Tracksites / Luis Alcalá, Martin G. Lockley, Alberto Cobos, Luis Mampel, and Rafael Royo-Torres
Part II. Palaeobiology and Evolution from Tracks
8. Iberian Sauropod Tracks through Time: Variations in Sauropod Manus and Pes Morphologies / Diego Castanera, Vanda F. Santos, Laura Piñuela, Carlos Pascual, Bernat Vila, José I. Canudo, and José Joaquin Moratalla
9. The Flexion of Sauropod Pedal Unguals and Testing the Substrate Grip Hypothesis Using the Trackway Fossil Record / Lee E. Hall, Ashley E. Fragomeni, and Denver W. Fowler
10. Dinosaur Swim Track Assemblages: Characteristics, Contexts, and Ichnofacies Implications / Andrew R. C. Milner, and Martin G. Lockley
11. Two-Toed Tracks through Time: On the Trail of "Raptors" and their Allies / Martin G. Lockley, Jerry D. Harris, Rihui Li, Lida Xing, and Torsten van der Lubbe
12. Diversity, Ontogeny, or Both? A Morphometric Approach to Iguanodontian Ornithopod (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) Track Assemblages from the Berriasian (Lower Cretaceous) of North Western Germany / Jahn J. Hornung, Annina Böhme, Nils Schlüter, and Mike Reich
13. Uncertainty and Ambiguity in the Interpretation of Sauropod Trackways / Kent A. Stevens, Scott Ernst, and Daniel Marty
14. Dinosaur Tracks as "Four-Dimensional Phenomena" Reveal How Different Species Moved / Alberto Cobos, Francisco Gascó, Rafael Royo-Torres, Martin G. Lockley, and Luis Alcalá
Part III. Ichnotaxonomy and Trackmaker Identification
15. Analysing and Resolving Cretaceous Avian Ichnotaxonomy Using Multivariate Statistical Analyses: Approaches and Results / Lisa G. Buckley, Richard T. McCrea, and Martin G. Lockley
16. Elusive Ornithischian Tracks in the Famous Berriasian (Lower Cretaceous) "Chicken Yard" Tracksite of Northern Germany: Quantitative Differentiation between Small Tridactyl Trackmakers / Tom Hübner
Part IV. Depositional Environments and their Influence on the Track Record
17. Too Many Tracks: Preliminary Description and Interpretation of the Diverse and Heavily Dinoturbated Early Cretaceous "Chicken Yard" Ichnoassemblage (Obernkirchen Tracksite, Northern Germany) / Annette Richter and Annina Böhme
18. Dinosaur Tracks in Eolian Strata: New Insights into Track Formation, Walking Kinetics, and Trackmaker Behaviour / David B. Loope, and Jesper Milàn
19. Analysis of Desiccation Crack Patterns for Quantitative Interpretation of Fossil Tracks / Tom Schanz, Maria Datcheva, Hanna Haase, and Daniel Marty
20. A Review of the Dinosaur Track Record from Jurassic and Cretaceous Shallow Marine Carbonate Depositional Environments / Simone D'Orazi Porchetti, Massimo Bernardi, Andrea Cinquegranelli, Vanda Faria dos Santos, Daniel Marty, Fabio Massimo Petti, Paulo Sá Caetano, and Alexander Wagensommer
Dinosaur Track Terminology: A Glossary of Terms
List of Contributors
Index

Sujets

Informations

Publié par
Date de parution 15 août 2016
Nombre de lectures 5
EAN13 9780253021144
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 6 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0500€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

Extrait

Dinosaur Tracks
LIFE OF THE PAST James O. Farlow, editor
DINOSAUR TRACKS
THE NEXT STEPS
EDITED BY
Peter L. Falkingham
Daniel Marty
Annette Richter
INDIANA UNIVERSITY PRESS Bloomington Indianapolis
This book is a publication of
Indiana University Press
Office of Scholarly Publishing
Herman B Wells Library 350
1320 East 10th Street
Bloomington, Indiana 47405 USA
iupress.indiana.edu
2016 by Indiana University Press
All rights reserved
No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying and recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. The Association of American University Presses Resolution on Permissions constitutes the only exception to this prohibition.
The paper used in this publication meets the minimum requirements of the American National Standard for Information Sciences - Permanence of Paper for Printed Library Materials, ANSI Z39.48-1992.
Manufactured in China
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Names: Falkingham, Peter L., editor. | Marty, Daniel, 1973- editor. | Richter, Annette, editor.
Title: Dinosaur tracks : the next steps / edited by Peter L. Falkingham, Daniel Marty, and Annette Richter.
Description: Bloomington : Indiana University Press, [2016] | Series: Life of the past | Includes bibliographical references and index.
Identifiers: LCCN 2016011885 (print) | LCCN 2016015807 (ebook) | ISBN 9780253021021 (cloth) | ISBN 9780253021144 (ebook)
Subjects: LCSH: Dinosaur tracks - Congresses. | Footprints, Fossil - Congresses.
Classification: LCC QE861.6.T72 D45 2016 (print) | LCC QE861.6.T72 (ebook) | DDC 567.9 - dc23
LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2016011885
1 2 3 4 5 21 20 19 18 17 16
Published with the generous support of:

Nieders chsisches Ministerium f r Wissenschaft und Kultur

Landesmuseum Hannover Das WeltenMuseum

Klosterkammer Hannover
Contents
C
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Peter L. Falkingham, Daniel Marty, and Annette Richter
Part 1. Approaches and Techniques for Studying Dinosaur Tracks
1
Experimental and Comparative Ichnology
Jesper Mil n and Peter L. Falkingham
2
Close-Range Photogrammetry for 3-D Ichnology: The Basics of Photogrammetric Ichnology
Neffra Matthews, Tommy Noble, and Brent Breithaupt
3
The Early Cretaceous Dinosaur Trackways in M nchehagen (Lower Saxony, Germany): 3-D Photogrammetry as Basis for Geometric Morphometric Analysis of Shape Variation and Evaluation of Material Loss during Excavation
Oliver Wings, Jens N. Lallensack, and Heinrich Mallison
4
Applying Objective Methods to Subjective Track Outlines
Peter L. Falkingham
5
Beyond Surfaces: A Particle-Based Perspective on Track Formation
Stephen M. Gatesy and Richard G. Ellis
6
A Numerical Scale for Quantifying the Quality of Preservation of Vertebrate Tracks
Matteo Belvedere and James O. Farlow
7
Evaluating the Dinosaur Track Record: An Integrative Approach to Understanding the Regional and Global Distribution, Scientific Importance, Preservation, and Management of Tracksites
Luis Alcal , Martin G. Lockley, Alberto Cobos, Luis Mampel, and Rafael Royo-Torres
Part 2. Paleobiology and Evolution from Tracks
8
Iberian Sauropod Tracks through Time: Variations in Sauropod Manus and Pes Morphologies
Diego Castanera, Vanda F. Santos, Laura Pi uela, Carlos Pascual, Bernat Vila, Jos I. Canudo, and Jos Joaquin Moratalla
9
The Flexion of Sauropod Pedal Unguals and Testing the Substrate Grip Hypothesis Using the Trackway Fossil Record
Lee E. Hall, Ashley E. Fragomeni, and Denver W. Fowler
10
Dinosaur Swim Track Assemblages: Characteristics, Contexts, and Ichnofacies Implications
Andrew R. C. Milner and Martin G. Lockley
11
Two-Toed Tracks through Time: On the Trail of Raptors and Their Allies
Martin G. Lockley, Jerald D. Harris, Rihui Li, Lida Xing, and Torsten van der Lubbe
12
Diversity, Ontogeny, or Both? A Morphometric Approach to Iguanodontian Ornithopod (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) Track Assemblages from the Berriasian (Lower Cretaceous) of Northwestern Germany
Jahn J. Hornung, Annina B hme, Nils Schl ter, and Mike Reich
13
Uncertainty and Ambiguity in the Interpretation of Sauropod Trackways
Kent A. Stevens, Scott Ernst, and Daniel Marty
14
Dinosaur Tracks as Four-Dimensional Phenomena Reveal How Different Species Moved
Alberto Cobos, Francisco Gasc , Rafael Royo-Torres, Martin G. Lockley, and Luis Alcal
Part 3. Ichnotaxonomy and Trackmaker Identification
15
Analyzing and Resolving Cretaceous Avian Ichnotaxonomy Using Multivariate Statistical Analyses: Approaches and Results
Lisa G. Buckley, Richard T. McCrea, and Martin G. Lockley
16
Elusive Ornithischian Tracks in the Famous Berriasian (Lower Cretaceous) Chicken Yard Tracksite of Northern Germany: Quantitative Differentiation between Small Tridactyl Trackmakers
Tom H bner
Part 4. Depositional Environments and Their Influence on the Track Record
17
Too Many Tracks: Preliminary Description and Interpretation of the Diverse and Heavily Dinoturbated Early Cretaceous Chicken Yard Ichnoassemblage (Obernkirchen Tracksite, Northern Germany)
Annette Richter and Annina B hme
18
Dinosaur Tracks in Eolian Strata: New Insights into Track Formation, Walking Kinetics, and Trackmaker Behavior
David B. Loope and Jesper Mil n
19
Analysis of Desiccation Crack Patterns for Quantitative Interpretation of Fossil Tracks
Tom Schanz, Maria Datcheva, Hanna Haase, and Daniel Marty
20
A Review of the Dinosaur Track Record from Jurassic and Cretaceous Shallow Marine Carbonate Depositional Environments
Simone D Orazi Porchetti, Massimo Bernardi, Andrea Cinquegranelli, Vanda Faria dos Santos, Daniel Marty, Fabio Massimo Petti, Paulo S Caetano, and Alexander Wagensommer
Paleoenvironment Reconstructions of Vertebrate Tracksites in the Obernkirchen Sandstone, Lower Cretaceous of Northwest Germany
Jahn J. Hornung, Annette Richter, and Frederik Spindler
Dinosaur Track Terminology: A Glossary of Terms
Daniel Marty, Peter L. Falkingham, and Annette Richter
Index
List of Contributors
Acknowledgments
A
THIS BOOK WAS DEVELOPED FROM A DINOSAUR TRACK symposium that was organized and held in April 2011 in Obernkirchen, Germany, on behalf of the Nieders chsisches Landesmuseum Hannover (Lower Saxony State Museum Hannover). The enthusiasm generated during the short span of the symposium resulted in the idea for a new up-to-date dinosaur track book. Many of the symposium participants - leading researchers in the field of dinosaur ichnology - authored chapters in this book. We heartily acknowledge all of the authors for their excellent papers and patience throughout the process of bringing this wide-ranging book to publication, as well as the numerous reviewers that have contributed to the high quality of the peer-reviewed chapters. Thanks also to the Nieders chsisches Ministerium f r Wissenschaft und Kultur (Lower Saxony Ministry for Science and Culture), which has underwritten a substantial portion of the costs associated with the publication of this book, notably the color figures throughout the book. The Klosterkammer Hannover also deserves our gratidtude for financing extra color paintings, including the cover picture. Finally, our thanks go to Jim Farlow and Bob Sloan (both of Indiana University Press) for their outstanding support for the project from its earliest inception.
Dinosaur Tracks
0.1. (Top) Nocturnal view of the Early Cretaceous moderately to heavily dinoturbated Chicken Yard level at the Obernkirchen tracksite. (Bottom) Group photo of the congress attendants during the conference at the Renaissance Castle of H lsede.

Introduction
I
Peter L. Falkingham, Daniel Marty, and Annette Richter
THE DINOSAURIA ARE ONE OF THE MOST MORPHOLOGI cally diverse groups of terrestrial vertebrates (Alexander, 1989), spanning several orders of magnitude in size from the smallest hummingbird to the largest sauropods. Ancestrally bipedal, groups within the Dinosauria evolved into a range of habitually and facultatively bipedal and quadrupedal animals. Their skeletons have been found on every continent (Weishampel, Dodson, and Osm lska, 2004), and their fossilized footprints are known from all except Antarctica.
The public perception of dinosaurs comes almost exclusively via their skeletons, and much of our knowledge about how these enigmatic animals looked and lived comes from osteological information. But the bones can only reveal so much, being as they are the product of a dead animal. Footprints and traces, on the other hand, are made by an animal during its life and can therefore shed light on paleobiological aspects that are not preserved in osteological remains - aspects such as behavior, locomotion, or paleoecology.
Vertebrate tracks are biogenic sedimentary structures and not body fossils or biological objects in the common sense. They result from the complex interaction of three factors: the sediment (its consistency and resistance to deformation), the foot dynamics (i.e., the kinematics and kinetics, or motions and forces, of the distal-most limb), and the anatomy of the foot (Padian and Olsen, 1984; Minter, Braddy, and Davis, 2007; Falkingham, 2014). Once fo

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