Governing Cities Through Regions

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English
418 pages
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Description

The region is back in town. Galloping urbanization has pushed beyond historical notions of metropolitanism. City-regions have experienced, in Edward Soja’s terms, “an epochal shift in the nature of the city and the urbanization process, marking the beginning of the end of the modern metropolis as we knew it.”


Governing Cities Through Regions broadens and deepens our understanding of metropolitan governance through an innovative comparative project that engages with Anglo-American, French, and German literatures on the subject of regional governance. It expands the comparative angle from issues of economic competiveness and social cohesion to topical and relevant fields such as housing and transportation, and it expands comparative work on municipal governance to the regional scale.


With contributions from established and emerging international scholars of urban and regional governance, the volume covers conceptual topics and case studies that contrast the experience of a range of Canadian metropolitan regions with a strong selection of European regions. It starts from assumptions of limited conversion among regions across the Atlantic but is keenly aware of the remarkable differences in urban regions’ path dependencies in which the larger processes of globalization and neo-liberalization are situated and materialized.


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Publié par
Date de parution 12 décembre 2016
Nombre de lectures 1
EAN13 9781771122610
Langue English
Poids de l'ouvrage 3 Mo

Informations légales : prix de location à la page 0,0057€. Cette information est donnée uniquement à titre indicatif conformément à la législation en vigueur.

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Governing Cities Through Regions
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Governing Cities Through Regions Canadian and European Perspectives
Roger Keil, Pierre Hamel, JulieAnne Boudreau, and Stefan Kipfer editors
Wilfrid Laurier University Press acknowledges the financial support of the Gov-ernment of Canada through the Canada Book Fund for its publishing activities. This work was supported by the Research Support Fund.
Library and Archives Canada Cataloguing in Publication  Governing cities through regions : Canadian and European perspectives / Roger Keil, Pierre Hamel, Julie-Anne Boudreau, and Stefan Kipfer, editors.
Includes bibliographical references and index. Issued in print and electronic formats. ISBN 978-1-77112-277-1 (paperback).—ISBN 978-1-77112-261-0 (pdf).— ISBN 978-1-77112-262-7 (epub)
 1. Metropolitan government—Canada—Case studies. 2. Metropolitan government—Europe—Case studies. 3. Regionalism—Canada—Case studies. 4. Regionalism—Europe—Case studies. I. Hamel, Pierre, 1947–, author, editor II. Keil, Roger, [date], author, editor III. Kipfer, Stefan, [date], author, editor IV. Boudreau, Julie-Anne, author, editor
JS1710.G65 2016
320.8’50971
C2016-903716-9 C2016-903717-7
Front cover image by Roger Keil. Cover and text design by Angela Booth Malleau. © 2017 Wilfrid Laurier University Press Waterloo, Ontario, Canada www.wlupress.wlu.ca
® This book is printed on FSC certified paper and is certified Ecologo. It contains post-consumer fibre, is processed chlorine free, and is manufactured using biogas energy.
Printed in Canada
Every reasonable effort has been made to acquire permission for copyright material used in this text, and to acknowledge all such indebtedness accurately. Any errors and omissions called to the publisher’s attention will be corrected in future printings.
No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, without the prior written consent of the publisher or a licence from the Canadian Copyright Licensing Agency (Access Copyright). For an Access Copyright licence, visit http://www.accesscopyright.ca or call toll-free to 1-800-893-5777.
Contents
Acknowledgements ix Section A: Conceptual, Comparative, and General Considerations  1 Regional Governance Revisited: Political Space, 3  Collective Agency, and Identity  Roger Keil, Pierre Hamel, Julie-Anne Boudreau, Stefan Kipfer, and Ahmed Allahwala  2 Social Agency and Collective Action in the 27  Structurally Transformed Metropolis:  Past and Future Research Agendas  Julie-Anne Boudreau and Pierre Hamel  3 Movements and Politics in the Metropolitan Region 41  Margit Mayer  4 Governing the Built Environment in European 65  Metropolitan Regions: Financialization,  Responsibilization, and Urban Competition  Susanne Heeg  5 The Global City-Region: A Constantly Emerging Scalar Fix 83  Bernd Belina and Ute Lehrer
Section B: Canadian Regions  6 Internalized Globalization and Regional Governance 101  in the Toronto Region  Roger Keil and Jean-Paul D. Addie  7 Governing the Networked Metropolis: The Regionalization 121  of Urban Transportation in Southern Ontario  Jean-Paul D. Addie
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Contents
8 “Build Toronto” (Not Social Housing): Neglecting 143  the Social Housing Question in a Competitive City-Region Teresa Abbruzzese 9 Shortcomings and Promises of Governing City-Regions 173  in the Canadian Federal Context: The Example of Montreal Pierre Hamel 10 Winnipeg: Aspirational Planning, Chaotic Development 197 Christopher Leo 11 Sustainability Fix Meets Growth Machine: 213 Attempting to Govern the Calgary Metropolitan Region Byron Miller 12 Provincial Distrust Weighs on Vancouver’s Regional 239  Governance Emmanuel Brunet-Jailly and Ève Arcand
Section C: European Regions  13 The Global City Comes Home: 259  Internalized Globalization in Frankfurt Rhine-Main  Roger Keil and Christoph Siegl  14Grand Paris: The Bumpy Road toward 283  Metropolitan Governance  Stefan Kipfer, Julie-Anne Boudreau, Pierre Hamel, and  Antoine Noubouwo  15 Genealogies of Urban-Regional Governance: 305  Journeys in a Post-Socialist City-Region  Mark Whitehead  16 Building Narratives of City-Regions: 319  The Case of Barcelona  Mariona Tomàs  17 The Resistible Rise of Italy’s Metropolitan Regions: 337 The Politics of Sub-National Government Reform  in Postwar Italy  Simon Parker  18 The Uncertain Development of Metropolitan Governance: 355  Comparing England’s First and Second City-Regions  Ian Gordon, Michael Harloe, and Alan Harding
19 Conclusion: North Atlantic Urban and Regional GovernanceJulie-Anne Boudreau, Pierre Hamel, Roger Keil, and Stefan Kipfer
Notes on Contributors Index
Contents
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Acknowledgements
this project startedwhen the financial crisis changed the world we live in. Urban regions have been the terrains, origins, and recipients of the fallout from this crisis all at once. The authors assembled in this volume have observed, researched, and analyzed “their” urban regions during the past decade as a collective enterprise. Initial meetings in Montreal, Toronto, and Paris set the stage for what turned out to be a longitudinal study of the governance of cities through regionalization in times of crisis. Those meetings and the investigations in various locales were assisted by many across a network of researchers from Vancouver to Katowice, from Manchester to Barcelona. We thank our European collaborators, Susanne Heeg at Goethe University in Frankfurt and Patrick Le Galès at Sciences Po, who hosted a memorable meeting of our group in Paris at the outset of our work. Some of the researchers for the project and authors in this book began as graduate students and have since moved on. We thank them for their enormous contribution to the success of this enterprise and for their long-lasting interest in the matters of regional governance that underlie this publication: Teresa Abbruzzese, Jean-Paul Addie, Ahmed Allahwala, Antoine Noubouwo, and Christoph Siegl. Others accompanied the project along the way. Among them were Isabelle Bordeleau and Julie Hagan in Montreal and Robert Fiedler, Vera Hoffmann, Evan MacDonough, Sarah Martin, Christine Mettler, and Helen Thang in Toronto. We also owe a big thanks to those who helped edit the manuscript as it evolved: Anna Coté, Jenny Lugar, Claire Major, and Daniel Taylor. The project was funded by a standard research grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. We are grateful for their support.
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