Nutrition in Institutions

Nutrition in Institutions

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Livres
440 pages

Description

The importance of good nutrition for individual health and well-being is widely recognized, yet for a significant number of people who rely on institutions for food and nutrition, this importance has not always been a primary consideration. People, therefore, may find themselves consuming food they would not ordinarily choose to eat, with, in some cases, restricted choices precluding individual preferences and compromising health.

In recent years, there have been major advances in the quality of catering in some areas, particularly schools. Other institutions which have not been thrust into the media spotlight have fared less well in terms of policy drive and commitment.

This insightful new book looks in detail at five institutions: schools, hospitals, care homes for the elderly, prisons and the armed forces. As well as providing a fascinating history of the provision of food in each institution, each section considers:

  • current policy and standards and their implementation
  • adequacy of food provided with regard to the health status and dietary requirements of the people in the care of each institution
  • efficiency of catering organization and issues relating to contract tendering, expenditure and procurement

A broad spectrum of further relevant issues is also covered, including the meaning of food to those in institutions and determinants of choice.

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Informations

Publié par
Ajouté le 26 janvier 2009
Nombre de lectures 1
EAN13 9781444301670
Licence : Tous droits réservés
Langue English
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Contents
Dedication Acknowledgements Introduction
Part 1 Schools Maria Cross 1.1 Introduction 1.2 The health of UK schoolchildren 1.3 A history of school meal provision to 2001 1.3.1 Winning the war 1.3.2 The post-war years 1.3.3 The end of an era 1.3.4 New Labour, new Acts 1.4 Children’s diets prior to the introduction of nutritional standards in 2001 1.5 The 2001 national nutritional standards 1.6 Monitoring the 2001 standards 1.7 Nutritional adequacy and meeting standards 1.8 Children’s dietary choices – post introduction of 2001 nutritional standards 1.8.1 Opting out 1.8.2 New standards, old choices 1.9 Nutritional standards in Scotland 1.10 Nutritional standards in Wales 1.11 Nutritional standards in Northern Ireland 1.12 Government initiatives to improve the diets of children 1.12.1 The National Healthy Schools Programme 1.12.2 National School Fruit and Vegetable Scheme (NSFVS) 1.12.3 The Food in Schools programme 1.12.4 Whole school food policy 1.13 Non-government initiatives to improve food in schools 1.13.1 The Caroline Walker Trust 1.13.2 Soil Association –Food for Lifecampaign
xi xiii xv
1
1 3 6 8 9 10 12 14 16 19 20 22 22 23 26 27 27 28 29 31 32 33 33 34 34
vi
1.14
1.15 1.16
1.17 1.18 1.19 1.20 1.21 1.22
1.23
1.24 1.25
1.26 1.27
1.28
1.29 1.30
1.31
Contents
1.13.3 Focus on Food Campaign 1.13.4 The Health Education Trust 1.13.5 Garden Organic 1.13.6 Sustain 1.13.7 Feed Me Better campaign Therunuptothe2006food-basedstandardsand2008/09nutrient-basedstandards 1.14.1 The School Meals Review Panel 1.14.2 The School Food Trust Interim food-based standards for school lunches Food-basedstandardsforallotherschoolfoodanddrink1.16.1 Breakfast clubs 1.16.2 Breakfast clubs in Scotland 1.16.3 Breakfast clubs in Wales 1.16.4 Breakfast clubs in Northern Ireland 1.16.5 Vending machines 1.16.6 Tuck shops Nutrient-based standards Final food-based standards Diverse diets and special dietary needs Target Nutrient Specifications Monitoring the new standards Current system of meals provision 1.22.1 The dining environment 1.22.2 The cashless payment system Catering contracts 1.23.1 Local authority in-house catering 1.23.2 Local authority contract with a private catering company 1.23.3 School contract with its own private catering company 1.23.4 In-house school meals provision Catering staff Expenditure 1.25.1 School meal expenditure, pre- new standards 1.25.2 School meal expenditure, post new standards Procurement of school meals Free school meals 1.27.1 Poverty 1.27.2 The Hull experience 1.27.3 The Scottish free school meals campaign The lunch box 1.28.1 Additional snack foods Food and cooking in the national curriculum School food – post new standards 1.30.1 Meal uptake 1.30.2 Catering facilities 1.30.3 What children choose now Determinants of choice 1.31.1 Education 1.31.2 School Nutrition Action Groups 1.31.3 Peer influence
34 35 36 36 36
37 39 41 42 45 46 47 47 48 48 49 49 49 50 50 51 51 52 53 53 54 54 54 54 55 56 57 57 57 60 61 62 64 65 67 67 69 69 71 71 72 72 73 73
1.32 1.33 1.34 1.35
1.31.4 Family influence 1.31.5 Advertising 1.31.6 What children say Diet and behaviour Good practice School meals in Europe and the US 1.34.1 Dietary habits 1.34.2 Overweight and obesity 1.34.3 School meal provision – Europe 1.34.4 United States 1.34.5 The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) 1.34.6 School Breakfast Program (SBP) Discussion and conclusion
Contents
Part 2 Hospitals Barbara MacDonald 2.1 Introduction 2.2 The development of workhouses 2.3 Food provision 2.3.1 Workhouse food 2.3.2 Hospital food 2.4 Current decade 2.4.1 Audit Commission 2.4.2 Better Hospital Food Programme 2.4.3 Assessment 2.4.4 Better Hospital Food Panel disbanded 2.5 Other initiatives 2.5.1 Protected mealtimes 2.5.2 Ward housekeepers 2.5.3 Modern matrons 2.5.4 Food wastage 2.5.5 Procurement and sustainable food 2.6 Alternative hospital catering facilities 2.6.1 Vending machines 2.7 Events in 2007 2.7.1 Royal College of Nursing (RCN) 2.7.2 National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA) 2.7.3 The Council of Europe Alliance (UK) 2.7.4 British Association for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (BAPEN) 2.7.5 Food Standards Agency (FSA) 2.8 Hospital food Scotland 2.8.1 Audit Scotland 2.8.2 Standards and assessment 2.9 Hospital food – Wales 2.9.1 Reports 2.9.2 Standards 2.9.3 Sustainability 2.10 Hospital food – Northern Ireland 2.10.1 Assessment 2.10.2 Future plans
vii
74 75 76 77 79 82 82 82 83 87 89 89 90
103
103 104 105 105 106 135 135 143 149 161 163 163 163 169 170 171 179 179 180 180 180 180 181 183 183 183 187 189 189 193 194 194 194 196
viii
Contents
2.11 Hospital food – Europe 2.11.1 Council of Europe 2.11.2 European Nutrition for Health Alliance (ENHA) 2.11.3 The Prague Declaration 2.12 Conclusion
Part 3 Care homes for the elderly Barbara MacDonald 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Workhouses 3.3 Reform and the development of care homes 3.3.1 1960s 3.3.2 1970s 3.3.3 1980s 3.3.4 1990s 3.4 Current decade 3.4.1 National Minimum Standards 3.4.2 Inspection 3.5 Other initiatives 3.5.1 Water 3.5.2 National Association of Care Catering and Sustain 3.6 Developments in 2007 3.6.1 British Association for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition 3.6.2 Food Standards Agency 3.6.3 Nutrition Action Summit & Action Plan 3.7 Scotland 3.7.1 Care standards 3.8 Wales 3.8.1 National Minimum Standards 3.9 Northern Ireland 3.9.1 Minimum standards 3.10 Europe 3.10.1 European Nutrition Day 3.10.2 Forum on undernutrition in care homes and home care 3.11 Useful resources 3.12 Conclusion
Part 4 Prisons Maria Cross 4.1 Introduction 4.2 The prison population 4.3 History of prison food 4.3.1 The eighteenth century 4.3.2 The nineteenth century and the Victorian era (1837–1901) 4.3.3 Twentieth century 4.4 Food today 4.4.1 The pre-select system 4.4.2 Northern Ireland 4.4.3 Dining environment
196 196 198 199 200
217
217 219 220 221 227 228 231 244 244 247 256 256 257 258 258 259 260 261 261 262 262 263 263 266 266 266 266 267
275
275 276 277 277 280 289 293 296 297 297
4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 4.9 4.10 4.11 4.12 4.13 4.14 4.15
Catering standards 4.5.1 Caterers as healthy eating providers 4.5.2 Specific nutrient standards 4.5.3 Menu planning 4.5.4 Minimum frequency of provision 4.5.5 Portion sizes 4.5.6 Variations in diet 4.5.7 Scotland 4.5.8 Northern Ireland Expenditure, procurement and staffing 4.6.1 Staffing 4.6.2 Prisoners in the kitchen 4.6.3 Scotland and Northern Ireland Monitoring standards 4.7.1 Internal monitoring 4.7.2 Prison service monitoring 4.7.3 External monitoring 4.7.4 Scotland 4.7.5 Northern Ireland Nutritional adequacy and meeting standards 4.8.1 Scotland 4.8.2 Northern Ireland 4.8.3 Prisoners’ views on food in prisons Good practice 4.9.1 Northern Ireland Whatprisonerschoosetoeat,andwhattheyknowabouthealthy eating The prison shop The health of people in prison 4.12.1 Exercise 4.12.2 Diabetes 4.12.3 Healthcare provision 4.12.4 Health in private prisons 4.12.5 Scotland 4.12.6 Northern Ireland Diet, nutrition and criminal behaviour Prisons worldwide 4.14.1 Health Discussion and conclusion
Part 5 Armed forces Maria Cross 5.1 Introduction 5.2 History of feeding the armed forces – the Army 5.2.1 Seventeenth century 5.2.2 Eighteenth century 5.2.3 Nineteenth and twentieth centuries 5.3 History of feeding the armed forces – the Navy 5.3.1 The Tudor era (1485–1603) and Stuart era (1603–1714) 5.3.2 The Georgian era (1714–1837) 5.3.3 Nineteenth and twenthieth centuries
Contents
ix
297 302 304 304 305 305 305 305 307 308 310 311 312 312 312 314 314 317 318 318 328 328 329 331 332
332 335 336 339 339 340 342 343 344 344 347 349 351
361
361 362 362 362 363 369 369 370 372
x
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7 5.8 5.9 5.10 5.11
5.12
5.13 5.14
Contents
Index
Current provision 5.4.1 Organisation 5.4.2 Pay-As-You-Dine and the core menu 5.4.3 JSP 456Defence Catering Manual Food and nutrient guidelines 5.5.1 Healthy catering 5.5.2 Menu planning The provision of food during operations 5.6.1 Types of ORP 5.6.2 Nutritional value of the ORP 5.6.3 The ORP in maritime operations 5.6.4 The ORP in air operations 5.6.5 Water supplies Monitoring of standards Catering costs Catering contracts and procurement Catering training Nutritional requirements of armed forces personnel 5.11.1 Expert Panel on Armed Forces Feeding (EPAFF) Nutrition education 5.12.1 The UK Armed Forces Personal Guide to Nutrition 5.12.2 Commanders’ Guide to Nutrition 5.12.3Guide to Fluid Intake Commanders’ During Military Operations in the Heat5.12.4 Armed Forces Nutritional Advisory Service (AFNAS) Competitions Discussion and conclusion
372 373 374 375 378 379 380 382 385 388 388 389 389 389 391 391 393 395 396 396 396 398
399 399 401 402
407