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Occupational Injuries From Electrical Shock and Arc Flash Events

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This brief presents information on occupational injuries from electric shock and arc flash events through a review of literature, electrical incident data, and similar sources. It includes pertinent information such as the nature of the incident, adherence to safety requirements, use of appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), and extent of injury.

Chapters address arc flash and shock hazards, and the need for empirical incident data on the actual hazards that may be experienced when equipment faults or adverse electrical events occur. Certain tasks where the risk of an arc flash or shock hazard may be lower, such as normal operation of properly installed and maintained equipment, may not require the use of any special PPE. Some of this risk reduction is based on anecdotal data, and the brief details why future research challenges will need more empirical incident data on the actual hazards and associated injuries that may be experienced when equipment faults or adverse electrical events occur.

Designed for professionals and researchers in fire protection engineering, workplace electrical tasks, or workplace safety, this brief offers a thorough overview of the trends in electrical injuries and the costs related to those injuries.



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This brief presents information on occupational injuries from electric shock and arc flash events through a review of literature, electrical incident data, and similar sources. It includes pertinent information such as the nature of the incident, adherence to safety requirements, use of appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), and extent of injury.
Chapters address arc flash and shock hazards, and the need for empirical incident data on the actual hazards that may be experienced when equipment faults or adverse electrical events occur. Certain tasks where the risk of an arc flash or shock hazard may be lower, such as normal operation of properly installed and maintained equipment, may not require the use of any special PPE. Some of this risk reduction is based on anecdotal data, and the brief details why future research challenges will need more empirical incident data on the actual hazards and associated injuries that may be experienced when equipment faults or adverse electrical events occur.
Designed for professionals and researchers in fire protection engineering, workplace electrical tasks, or workplace safety, this brief offers a thorough overview of the trends in electrical injuries and the costs related to those injuries.