Partition Vocal score, chansons et madrigaux of pour Fifteenth Century

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Pratiquez la partition de morceau chansons et madrigaux of pour Fifteenth Century Vocal score, composition de Various. Cette partition renaissance célèbre dédiée aux instruments suivants: 1 - 3 voix
Cette partition est constituée de plusieurs mouvements et une subtile association d'instruments.
Retrouvez encore tout un choix de musique pour 1 - 3 voix sur YouScribe, dans la rubrique Partitions de musique de la renaissance.
Rédacteur: The Plainsong and Mediaeval Music Society
Edition: London: Bernhard Quaritch, 1891

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ISONGS AND MADRIGALS
OF THE
FIFTEENTH CENTURY.
'^'^ ^iii/i^i.S?
300 Copies printed, which this is No. ^.izHofA COLLECTION
OF
SONGS
AND
MADRIGALS
BY
ENGLISH COMPOSERS
OF THE CLOSE OF THE
FIFTEENTH CENTURY.
PREPARED FOR THE MEMBERS OF
THE PLAIN MEDIAEVAL MUSIC SOCIETY.SONG AND
LONDON:
OUARITCH, PICCADILLY, W.PUBLISHED BY BERNARD 15,
1891.;
PREFACE.
^ contained in this volume,/ ^HE Songs and Madrigals and exemplifying
JL the closethe state English Musical Art at the century,of of fifteenth
taken MSS. in the British Museum, which are well known toare from
antiquarians but not to musicians in general. It is hoped that the specimens
here given may create a wider interest than now exists in Mediceval English
Mtisic, and so the publication by degrees in extenso all our earlyjustify of
music still in existence. Some Madrigals were reproducedthe by Staffordof
translation tlie old notation isSmith in the year ij'jg, but his oftenof
defective and unreliable. No. by King Henry P'lII., is given in they,
anform in which it appears on Add. MSS. 3ig22 as instrumentalfol. ^j of
piece ; but on the same MS. a shorter version is given with wordsfol. 4g of
— i' containsas the Madrigal " love now reigned The same MS. a versionIf
""the song Ah I the sighs as the middle part a Madrigal, but witIt theofof
to suit the cottnterpoint.melody somewhat modified
The words the Madrigals have not been altered except in spelling and,of
where a was necessaryin one instance, modification for a modern audience.
They are not reproduced on the Plates the ancient notation, as, unless thisof
were done in absolute facsimile, no value would attach to the reproduction.
The text is very irregularly written in the original, but in theoften trans-
lation the syllables have been allocated as closely as possible to their proper
notes. The words the Songs have and verses omittedof been more modernized,
are printed their original The accompanimentsthey therefore belo'cv in form.
Songs have beento the written specially this work by Dr. C. W. Pearce.forSONGS AND MADRIGALS OF THE
FIFTEENTH CENTURY.
I—THE MUSIC.
the songs are unbarred, andthe Original Manuscript unaccompanied.
IN
are characterized generally by a natural and gracefulThe melodies
words, whilst their diatonicmusical expression of the simplicity will be
ears unaccustomed to anything but theparticularly grateful to chromatic
gorgeousness of modern music. Three of the seven are distinctly pastoral J
lost her Kye," "In May," and "The littleviz:—"Kitt hath pretty nightingale."
music might almost be described as the counterpart in sound ofTheir some of
of Watteau. The remainingthe well-known Arcadian scenes four are more
amorous nature, and express the love sighs as faithfullyor less of an as though
been written but yesterday. Several of the songsthe music had have such
somewhat difficultan extended vocal range that it is to assign them to any
"particular kind of voice {see In May") ; hence it is not unlikely that these
particularmay have been written specially for some singer of the day, a
which has tended to exercise a power over composerscircumstance of all
musicians oftimes ; and from which influence the present time are not
one or two places, the leap of a fourth is successivelyexempt. In taken twice
direction, thus formingin the same the interval of a seventh with but one
its two— melodic progression regardednote between a which is at the present
day as being rather unvocal.