The Naval History of the United States - Volume 2

The Naval History of the United States - Volume 2

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Naval History of the United States, by
Willis J. Abbot
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: The Naval History of the United States
Volume 2 (of 2)
Author: Willis J. Abbot
Illustrator: H. W. McVicar
W. C. Jackson
Release Date: August 24, 2008 [EBook #26416]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK NAVAL HISTORY ***
Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Christine P. Travers and
the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at
http://www.pgdp.net
Transcriber's note: Obvious printer's errors have been corrected, all other inconsistencies are as in the original. The
author's spelling has been maintained.
Page 993: "they were fired upon the Coreans" has been replaced by "they were fired upon by the Coreans".
Page 997: "the rescued part arrived in New York" has been replaced by "the rescued party arrived in New York".
The Table of Contents and the List of Illustration were not present in the original.
Battle of Lake Champlain.
THE NAVAL HISTORY
OF THE
UNITED STATES
BY WILLIS J. ABBOT
With Many Illustrations
BY H. W. McVICAR AND W. C. JACKSON
New York:
PETER FENELON COLLIER, PUBLISHER.
CONTENTS.
THE NAVAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. VOLUME TWO PART II.
CHAPTER XII.
Capture of the "Surveyor."—Work of the Gunboat ...

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Publié le 08 décembre 2010
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Naval History of the United States, by Willis J. Abbot
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: The Naval History of the United States Volume 2 (of 2)
Author: Willis J. Abbot
Illustrator: H. W. McVicar W. C. Jackson
Release Date: August 24, 2008 [EBook #26416]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK NAVAL HISTORY ***
Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Christine P. Travers and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
Transcriber's note: Obvious printer's errors have been corrected, all other inconsistencies are as in the original. The author's spelling has been maintained.
Page 993: "they were fired upon the Coreans" has been replaced by "they were fired upon by the Coreans".
Page 997: "the rescued part arrived in New York" has been replaced by "the rescued party arrived in New York".
The Table of Contents and the List of Illustration were not present in the original.
Battle of Lake Champlain.
THE NAVAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES
BY
WILLIS J. ABBOT
With Many Illustrations BY H. W. McVICAR AND W. C. JACKSON
New York: PETER FENELON COLLIER, PUBLISHER.
CONTENTS. THE NAVAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES.
VOLUME TWO
CHAPTER XII.
PART II.
Capture of the "Surveyor."—Work of the Gunboat Flotilla.—Operations on Chesapeake Bay.—Cockburn's Depredations.—Cruise of the "Argus."—Her Capture by the "Pelican."—Battle Between the "Enterprise" and "Boxer."—End of the Year 1813 on the Ocean.
CHAPTER XIII.
On the Lakes.—Close of Hostilities on Lakes Erie and Huron.—Desultory Warfare on Lake Ontario in 1813.—Hostilities on Lake Ontario in 1814.—The Battle of Lake Champlain.—End of the War upon the Lakes.
CHAPTER XIV. On the Ocean.—The Work of the Sloops-of-War.—Loss of the "Frolic."—Fruitless Cruise of the "Adams."—The "Peacock" Takes the "Épervier."—The Cruise of the "wasp."—She Captures the "Reindeer."—Sinks the "Avon."—Mysterious End of the "Wasp".
CHAPTER XV. Operations on the New England Coast.—The Bombardment of Stonington.—Destruction Of the United States Corvette "Adams."—Operations on Chesapeake Bay.—Work of Barney's Barge Flotilla.—Advance of the British Upon Washington.—Destruction of the Capitol.—Operations Against Baltimore.—Bombardment of Fort McHenry.
CHAPTER XVI.
Desultory Hostilities on the Ocean.—Attack Upon Fort Bowyer.—Lafitte the Pirate.—British Expedition Against New Orleans.—Battle of the Rigolets.—Attack On New Orleans, and Defeat of the British.—Work of the Blue-jackets.—Capture Of the Frigate "President."—The "Constitution" takes The "Cyane" and "Levant."—The "Hornet" Takes the "Penguin."—End of the War.
CHAPTER XVII.
Privateers and Prisons of the War.—The "Rossie."—Salem Privateers.—The "Gen. Armstrong" Gives Battle To a British Squadron, and Saves New Orleans.—Narrative of a British Officer.—The "Prince de Neufchatel."—Experiences Of American Prisoners of War.—The End.
CHAPTER XVIII.
The Long Peace Broken by the War With Mexico.—Activity of the Navy.—Captain Stockton's Stratagem.—The Battle at San Jose.—The Blockade.—Instances of Personal Bravery.—The Loss of the "Truxton."—Yellow Fever in the Squadron.—The Navy at Vera Cruz.—Capture of Alvarado.
CHAPTER XIX.
The Navy in Peace.—Surveying the Dead Sea.—Suppressing the Slave Trade.—The Franklin Relief Expedition.—Commodore Perry in Japan. —Signing of the Treaty.—Trouble in Chinese Waters.—The Koszta Case.—The Second Franklin Relief Expedition.—Foote at Canton.—"Blood is Thicker Than Water".
PART III. BLUE JACKETS OF '61.
CHAPTER I. The Opening of the Conflict.—The Navies of the Contestants.—Dix's Famous Despatch.—The River-gunboats.
CHAPTER II. Fort Sumter Bombarded.—Attempt of the "Star of the West" to Re-enforce Anderson.—The Naval Expedition to Fort Sumter.—The Rescue of the Frigate "Constitution."—Burning the Norfolk Navy-Yard.
CHAPTER III.
Difficulties of the Confederates in Getting a Navy.—Exploit of the "French Lady."—Naval Skirmishing on the Potomac.—The Cruise of the "Sumter"
CHAPTER IV. The Potomac Flotilla.—Capture of Alexandria.—Actions at Matthias Point.—Bombardment of the Hatteras Forts.
CHAPTER V. The "Trent"Affair.—Operations in Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds.—Destruction of the Confederate Fleet.
CHAPTER VI. Reduction of Newbern.—Exploits of Lieut. Cushing.—Destruction of the Ram "Albemarle".
CHAPTER VII.
The Blockade-runners.—Nassau and Wilmington.—Work of the Cruisers.
CHAPTER VIII.
Du Pont's Expedition to Hilton Head and Port Royal.—The Fiery Circle.
CHAPTER IX. The First Ironclad Vessels in History.—The "Merrimac" Sinks the "Cumberland," and Destroys the "Congress."—Duel between the "Monitor" and "Merrimac".
CHAPTER X. The Navy in the Inland Waters.—The Mississippi Squadron.—Sweeping the Tennessee River.
CHAPTER XI. Famous Confederate Privateers,—The "Alabama," the "Shenandoah," the "Nashville".
CHAPTER XII.
Work of the Gulf Squadron.—The Fight at the Passes of the Mississippi.—Destruction of the Schooner "Judah."—The Blockade of Galveston, and Capture of the "Harriet Lane".
CHAPTER XIII.
The Capture of New Orleans.—Farragut's Fleet passes Fort St. Philip and Fort Jackson.
CHAPTER XIV. Along the Mississippi.—Forts Jackson and St. Philip Surrender.—The Battle at St. Charles.—The Ram "Arkansas."—Bombardment and Capture of Port Hudson.
CHAPTER XV. On To Vicksburg.—Bombardment of the Confederate Stronghold.—Porter's Cruise in the Forests.
CHAPTER XVI.
Vicksburg Surrenders, and the Mississippi is opened.—Naval Events along the Gulf Coast.
CHAPTER XVII.
Operations About Charleston.—The Bombardment, the Siege, and the Capture.
CHAPTER XVIII.
The Battle of Mobile Bay.
CHAPTER XIX.
The Fall of Fort Fisher.—The Navy ends its Work.
PART IV. BLUE JACKETS IN TIME OF PEACE.
CHAPTER I. Police Service on the High Seas.—War Service in Asiatic Ports.—Losses by the Perils of the Deep.—A Brush With the Pirates.—Admiral Rodgers at Corea.—Services in Arctic Waters.—The Disaster at Samoa.—The Attack on the "Baltimore's" Men at Valparaiso.—Loss of the "Kearsarge."—The Naval Review.
CHAPTER II. The Naval Militia.—AVolunteer Service which in Time of War will be Effective.—How Boys are Trained for the Life of a Sailor.—Conditions of Enlistment in the Volunteer Branch of the Service.—The Work of the Seagoing Militia in Summer.
CHAPTER III.
How the Navy Has Grown.—The Cost and Character of Our New White Ships of War.—Our Period of Naval Weakness and our Advance to a Place among the Great Naval Powers.—The New Devices of Naval Warfare.—The Torpedo, the Dynamite Gun, and the Modern Rifle.—Armor and its Possibilities.