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Frost & Sullivan Debate: Personal or Public? - The Future of Urban Mobility in a Low Carbon World

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Frost & Sullivan Debate: Personal or Public? - The Future of Urban Mobility in a Low Carbon World PR Newswire LONDON, June 13, 2012 - While Car Manufacturers will Transform into Service Providers, Governments Need to Promote a Sustainable and Cost-efficient Transport Solution LONDON, June 13, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- The mobility share of the car as a means of transport has recently been declining. A 2011 survey conducted by Frost & Sullivan in 23 mega cities globally revealed that the share of public transport as well as push bikes has increased by around one to 2 per cent within one year. At the same time, car ownership per 1000 people in the cities of the developed world remains the same, and in some cases, is even falling. This was one of the key themes of the discussion during Frost & Sullivan's debate 'Personal or Public? Urban Mobility in a Low Carbon World', taking place at the House of Lords in London this afternoon. The first day of the two-day congress was opened by Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Transport, Mr. Norman Baker MP. "The UK is well placed to lead the race in low carbon road technology," said Mr. Baker during his keynote speech. "Overall, we need to cut carbon and create growth, and that is why the UK government is committed to do with a GBP 560 million sustainable transport fund. If we want to achieve the government targets of 80 per cent reduction carbon emissions we need to pull all the levers." Mr.
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Frost & Sullivan Debate: Personal or Public? -
The Future of Urban Mobility in a Low Carbon
World
PR Newswire
LONDON, June 13, 2012
- While Car Manufacturers will Transform into Service Providers,
Governments Need to Promote a Sustainable and Cost-efficient
Transport Solution
LONDON
,
June 13, 2012
/PRNewswire/ -- The mobility share of the car as a
means of transport has recently been declining. A 2011 survey conducted by
Frost & Sullivan in 23 mega cities globally revealed that the share of public
transport as well as push bikes has increased by around one to 2 per cent
within one year. At the same time, car ownership per 1000 people in the cities
of the developed world remains the same, and in some cases, is even falling.
This was one of the key themes of the discussion during Frost & Sullivan's
debate
'Personal or Public? Urban Mobility in a Low Carbon World'
,
taking place at the House of Lords in
London
this afternoon. The first day of the
two-day congress was opened by Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for
Transport, Mr. Norman Baker MP.
"The UK is well placed to lead the race in low carbon road technology," said Mr.
Baker during his keynote speech. "Overall, we need to cut carbon and create
growth, and that is why the UK government is committed to do with a
GBP 560
million
sustainable transport fund. If we want to achieve the government
targets of 80 per cent reduction carbon emissions we need to pull all the
levers."
Mr. Baker suggested that integration is the way forward: "The debate or answer
is not personal versus private transport, but integrated."
To brace themselves for the inevitable threat presented by declining car
ownership and rising car sharing schemes, car manufacturers are in the
process of transforming themselves into service providers by offering
integrated mobility solutions. Major car companies like BMW, Peugeot and
Daimler are unveiling integrated mobility-on-demand solutions. Vehicle
manufacturers today are measuring their mobility share and not their market
share anymore.
Owning a car is a difficult endeavour for the young people of today. Car
insurance, especially for young drivers (18 to 25 year olds) has soared, making
it impossible for them to own a car. In the UK, drivers under the age of 21 have
seen their average annual cost of cover rise to more than
2,000 pounds
Sterling
. The challenge for the governments is therefore, to pre-empt a
landscape of declining opportunities for the car industry, by understanding and
prioritising investment, and promoting sustainable and cost efficient transport
solutions. Greater buy-in and understanding among users and customers is
crucial, if policy is to nurture and encourage sustainable travel practices among
urbanites of the future.
"The industry needs the support of the policy holders and relief from some of