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An atlas of classical geography

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174 pages
:AN ATLASOPGEOGRAPHY.CLASSICALCONSTRUCTED BYWILLIAM HUGHES,AND EDITED BYGEORGE LONG.PROFESSOR OF ANCIENT LANGUAGES IN THE UNIVERSITYFORMERLY OF VIRGINIAWITHA SKETCH OF CLASSICAL GEOGRAPHY,AND OTHER ADDITIONS,BY THE AMERICAN EDITOR.CONTAININGFIFTY-TWO MAPS AND PLANS ON TWENTY-SIX PLATES,WITH AN INDEX OF PLACES.PHILADELPHIABLANCHAED & LEA,185 7.OOiIZSlEntered, according to the Act of Congress, in the year 1856, byBLANCHARD & LEA,in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania,& P. G. Collins.Printel \.j T. K.AMERICAN PUBLISHERS' NOTICE.In reproducing the present work, various additions have been thought desirable. Forreasons adduced in his Preface, Mr. Long inserted no boundaries in the maps. Impos-sible as it may be, at this distance of time, to determine with absolute accuracy thelimits of contiguous territories, it yet was felt that without some indication of theiras generally received by classical scholars, the studentposition, would frequently feelwant of an assistance to which he had become accustomed;the and they have accord-ingly been introduced from standard authorities.The interest attaching to the gradual development of geographical knowledgeamong the ancients, has seemed to render desirable the introduction of the charts col-lected on Plate showing at a glance the progress of1, information from the earliesttimes, the studentand enabling to comprehend and appreciate ...
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: AN ATLAS OP GEOGRAPHY.CLASSICAL CONSTRUCTED BY WILLIAM HUGHES, AND EDITED BY GEORGE LONG. PROFESSOR OF ANCIENT LANGUAGES IN THE UNIVERSITYFORMERLY OF VIRGINIA WITH A SKETCH OF CLASSICAL GEOGRAPHY, AND OTHER ADDITIONS, BY THE AMERICAN EDITOR. CONTAINING FIFTY-TWO MAPS AND PLANS ON TWENTY-SIX PLATES, WITH AN INDEX OF PLACES. PHILADELPHIA BLANCHAED & LEA, 185 7. OOiI ZSl Entered, according to the Act of Congress, in the year 1856, by BLANCHARD & LEA, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, & P. G. Collins.Printel \.j T. K. AMERICAN PUBLISHERS' NOTICE. In reproducing the present work, various additions have been thought desirable. For reasons adduced in his Preface, Mr. Long inserted no boundaries in the maps. Impos- sible as it may be, at this distance of time, to determine with absolute accuracy the limits of contiguous territories, it yet was felt that without some indication of their as generally received by classical scholars, the studentposition, would frequently feel want of an assistance to which he had become accustomed;the and they have accord- ingly been introduced from standard authorities. The interest attaching to the gradual development of geographical knowledge among the ancients, has seemed to render desirable the introduction of the charts col- lected on Plate showing at a glance the progress of1, information from the earliest times, the studentand enabling to comprehend and appreciate the ideas of the writers of successive periods. Plate has26 likewise been added, presenting topographical plans, on an enlarged scale, of various places of interest, which may serve to elucidate passages in numerous classical authors. These additions have been selected from Icadin^^ authorities, such as Kiefert, Forbiger, and Johnston. With the view of rendering the work a convenient text-book for the student, a condensed sketch of Classical Geography has been prefixed, compiled and adapted principally from the recent manual of Professor Pillans, of Edinburgh. In this the has been, notobject to present a complete enumeration of places, but mei-ely to furnish (iii) iv AMERICAN PUBLISHERS' NOTICE. such supplementary information as cannot be embodied in the ir:aps. No allusion has been made Sacredto Geography, a subject too extensive and too important to be dis- missed within the limits necessarily assigned to the Insketch. revising the Index, the opportunity has occasionally been found of marking the quantity of a syllable left un- accented by Mr. Long; and this has been done whenever practicable. In many in- stances, however, places of little note, whose nvames do not occur among the poets, are necessarily uncertain. Every care has been taken throughout to obtain entire accuracy, in the most careful revision of both maps and text by the gentleman who has made the additions and superintended the press. The publishers trust that their efforts have not been misdi- rected, and that they will be found to have succeeded in producing an Atlas in every way suited to the increasing requirements of the improved classical scholars]) of theip age. Philadelphia, August, 185G. ; PREFACE. The Maps in this Atlas have been constructed by William Hughes from the best authorities; and they have been engraved under his superintendence. The original drawings and the engraved maps have been revised by George Long. No pains have been spared to make the maps correct and though; it is impossible to avoid some errors in a work of this kind, it is hoped that there are not many. Such as may be discovered will corrected.be The distriliution of the suljject-matter of this ancient Atlas differs from that of other Atlases in several respects. The map of the Roman Provinces is one example of this there are several other maps which will not be found in theand common Atlases. This Atlas is intended for the use of students both at schools and at college ; and though it does not contain every name, it contains everything that a classical student can want. No attempt has been made''' to show the exact boundaries of the political divisions and subdivisions of countries, wdiich cannot be done, in small maps at least, with sufficient accuracy and many; in cases it cannot be done at all. A student must learn what these boundaries are, so far as they can be ascertained, either from works on Ancient Geography, or from the instruction of a teacher. The best method of teaching Geography in schools is by oral on the Map, followed by examination. GEORGE LONG. * wi See American Publishei's' Notice. (V)