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The Public School Forum's Friday Report

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The Public School Forum's Friday Report

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Ajouté le : 21 juillet 2011
Lecture(s) : 51
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The Public School Forum’s Friday Report
PDF versions can be found at www.ncforum.org
Volume 13, Issue 41
May 6, 2011
A Coalition of 39 State and Local Organizations Says
―Our Children Are Worth a Penny‖
Standing on the Capitol lawn, 39 statewide and local organizations representing parents,
educators and community groups, called on the General Assembly to stop slashing state
government by leaving the temporary one-cent sales tax in place for two more years.
Wearing badges that said ―Our Children Are Worth a Penny and We’re Already Paying
It,‖ the leaders of a number of the organizations announced that starting next week delegations
will daily be coming to Raleigh to meet with legislators and that dozens of local and regional
events calling on legislators to prevent deep cuts to education and public services will take place
around the state.
Tom Bradshaw, former Chair of the State Chamber and former Mayor of Raleigh, opened
the news conference by saying, ―The business community wants North Carolina to have world-
class schools.
We are not going to get and keep good jobs if we go backwards in education.‖
Debra Horton, Executive Director of the North Carolina Parent Teacher Organization
(PTA) said, ―Polls show that given a choice between deep cuts to our schools, colleges and
services and continuing to pay the one-cent tax we already pay, that people of North Carolina
would keep paying it.
It costs the average taxpayer less than a quarter a day and our kids are
worth much more than that.‖
Joe (Coach) White, the President of the North Carolina School Boards Association and
the former Chairman of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School Board, added, ―The cuts currently
under consideration are going to force local County Commissioners to either cut local services
dramatically or raise local taxes.
What is being considered is a reverse jobs bill – it will add
thousands to the unemployment rolls of counties across the state and drive up the need for more
services to out-of-work citizens.‖
Representing school/business partnerships and foundations, Martha Vick, the Executive
Director of the Wilson Education Partnership, a business and foundation-supported group
supporting schools, added, ―Our education system and the services our local and state
government provide are among the strongest economic development attractions North Carolina
has to offer.
Counties like Wilson are not going to attract good jobs with a mediocre education
system and inadequate public services.‖
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