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ORGANIZATION AL COMMUNICATION

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115 pages
  • redaction - matière potentielle : the questions
  • redaction
114 ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION They'll negotiate; they're corporate. Johnny in Johnny Mnemonic This chapter looks at interpersonal and group communication, especially as they relate to professional settings. Interpersonal communication refers to one-on-one or small group interactions. Research generally suggests that this type of communication is influential in changing opinions, dealing with resistance and apathy to issues, and generally maintaining harmony in social situations – more so than its opposite, mass communication.
  • cultural values
  • subordinates
  • cooperative orientation
  • globe model
  • scoring cultures
  • roles
  • team
  • group
  • problem
  • individual
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Mastering Standardized Tests
Student EditionCopyright © by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
Permission is granted to reproduce the material contained herein on the condition
that such material be reproduced only for classroom use; be provided to students,
teachers, and families without charge; and be used solely in conjunction with the
Glencoe Science program. Any other reproduction, for use or sale, is prohibited
without prior written permission of the publisher.
Send all inquiries to:
Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
8787 Orion Place
Columbus, OH 43240-4027
ISBN 0-07-873029-5
Printed in the United States of America.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 045 08 07 06 05Contents
Introduction
What is in this book?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1
Task Regimen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Test-Taking Tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Unit 1: Science and Technology
Chapter 1: The Nature of Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Chapter 2: Science, Technology, and Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Unit 2: Motion, Forces, and Energy
Chapter 3: Motion, Acceleration, and Forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Chapter 4: The Laws of Motion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Chapter 5: Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Chapter 6: Work and Machines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Chapter 7: The Earth–Moon–Sun System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Chapter 8: The Solar System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Unit 3: Energy in Motion
Chapter 9: Heat and States of Matter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Chapter 10: Waves. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Chapter 11: Sound and Light . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Chapter 12: Earth’s Internal Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Unit 4: Forms of Energy
Chapter 13: Electricity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Chapter 14: Magnetism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60Chapter 15: Electromagnetic Radiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Chapter 16: Energy Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Chapter 17: Weather and Climate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Unit 5: Matter and Earth Materials
Chapter 18: Classification of Matter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Chapter 19: Properties of Atoms and Periodic Table . . . . . . . . . 80
Chapter 20: Earth Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Chapter 21: Earth’s Changing Surface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Unit 6: Interactions of Matter
Chapter 22: Chemical Bonds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Chapter 23: Chemical Reactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Chapter 24: Solutions, Acids, and Bases. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Chapter 25: Nuclear Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Chapter 26: Stars and Galaxies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108Introduction
What is in this book?
Welcome to the Student Edition of Mastering Standardized Tests for Physical
Science with Earth Science.
There are three distinct sections in this workbook:
• Introduction: Methods
This introduction provides you with methods to tackle test questions. Using the
methods in this introduction, you will learn how to use the process of elimination,
how to identify important information in the tests’ graphs, charts, and tables, as well
as other skills that can help you succeed on tests. Carefully study the methods in this
introduction before you begin the test questions in this workbook.
This workbook was written to accompany your textbook. For every chapter in your
textbook, there are two types of tests in this workbook.
• Chapter Test: Content Mastery
For every chapter in the textbook, this workbook contains a Chapter Test. Each
Chapter Test is made up of multiple-choice questions designed to assess your
knowledge and understanding of the material in the corresponding chapter of the
textbook.
• Standardized Test Practice: Test Preparation
For every chapter in the textbook, this workbook contains a correspondingest Practice. The questions in this section are designed to prepare you
for national science tests such as the TerraNova, the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills (ITBS),
and the Stanford Achievement Test, Tenth Edition (SAT-10). The format of the
questions found in these practice tests is very similar to the format of the questions
found in the actual national science tests.
Physical Science with Earth Science Introduction • 1
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.Methods of Content Review and Test Preparation
A unique four-part Task Regimen and helpful Test-Taking Tips designed to
maximize the benefits of using this workbook are presented in this section. Each of the
four tasks is designed to help you identify challenges and improve your performance.
Each task has an assignment for you to do on your own at home and one to do in
class. The homework and the in-class activities will often be coordinated, so it is
important that you concentrate on both equally.
Remember, the entire goal of this workbook is to benefit YOU!
Before you begin this workbook, take a minute to answer the following questions.
On the blank lines, write in any other questions or ideas you might have. Remember
to discuss your questions with your teacher so that you can be fully informed
about the test.
1. Is the standardized test timed, or will I have unlimited time?
2. Am I allowed to write on the test? If not, do I need to bring scratch paper?
3. Where will the test be held? Is it in a room that tends to be cold, and should I
bring a sweater?
4.
5.
2 • Introduction Physical Science with Earth Science
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.Task Regimen
Task I
Objective: To use the Chapter Tests to review science material from your
textbook
At-Home Goal: To identify parts of the textbook you need to review further
In-Class Goal: To receive explanations about details from the textbook chapter and
help with content that you need to review further
Task I Example 1
At-Home Assignment
Which type of wind generally moves from the
For each question you missed southwest to the northeast in the northern
in the Chapter Test, find the hemisphere?
pages in the textbook that
f. polar easterlies
cover the material.
g. jet stream
If you cannot find the
h. sea breeze
information, write out three
j. prevailing westerlies
questions about the material
that you did not understand. Note the page in the textbook where this
information can be found.
In-Class Assignment
Work in a group to review the
textbook material and the
missed questions. Have your
teacher explain any questions
or concepts that your group
does not understand.
How It Will Help You
By receiving personal attention,
you will be able to have all of
your specific questions
answered and explained.
Reviewing the missed questions
will help you make sure that
you understand your mistakes.
Physical Science with Earth Science Introduction • 3
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.Task II
Objective: To use the Standardized Test Practices as preparation for actual
standardized tests
In-Class Goal: To practice working on test-like questions in a realistic test-taking
environment
At-Home Goal: To analyze your mistakes and identify any questions on which you
need more work
Task II Example 2
In-Class Assignment
Test Element 1 Element 2 Element 3 Element 4
Take the test in a
Conductivity Yes Yes No No
realistic test-taking
Physical Shiny solid
Shiny solid Colorless gas Yellow gasenvironment. appearance stored in oil
Very Reacts with Reacts withReactivity Unreactive
reactive non-metals alkali metalsAt-Home Assignment
A fifth element also was tested. It did not conduct, itWith an answer key
reacted with alkali metals, and it was a gas. Thisfrom your teacher,
element behaved most similarly toreview your test. Using
your textbook, review F Element 1 Carefully consider the
any incorrect answers. information in the table. None G Element 2Put a question mark of these elements reacts with
beside any questions H Element 3 alkali metals and is a gas.
that you cannot figure Therefore, all of these answerJ Element 4
out and bring them to choices are incorrect.
class the next day.
How It Will Help You
Carefully consider the information in the
This assignment will table again. Only Element 4 reacts with
help you carefully alkali metals and is a gas.
analyze your mistakes
and identify the exact
reason you answered
some questions
incorrectly. You will
also receive help with
questions you need
to review.
4 • Introduction Physical Science with Earth Science
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.Task III
Objective: To use the process of elimination during testing situations
At-Home Goal: To practice using the process of elimination to identify incorrect
answer choices
In-Class Goal: To strengthen your use of the process of elimination
Task III
Example 3At-Home Assignment
Make a list of the hardest
Respondquestions and consider
Take In andeach answer choice. Note Grow and
Use EnergyDevelopwhether you think each
answer choice is correct or
incorrect and why. Place a
Living Things
line through the letter of
each answer choice that
you eliminate. Put a Reproduce Organized
question mark next to any
answer choices that you Which of these statements is correct?
are not certain about. Feel
F Rocks grow and develop from energy.free to use the textbook
when needed. G Energy uses living things.
H Trees respond to the wind.In-Class Assignment
J Young animals grow into mature animals.Your teacher will lead a
discussion about the
Choice F: No, rocks do not grow. They do not answer choices for each
use energy. question. Share your ideas
and analysis with the class.
Choice G: No, living things use energy. Energy
How It Will Help You does not use living things.
Working alone and as a
class will give you a Choice H: No, trees move in the wind, but it is
chance to learn and not a response.
practice the process of
elimination. You will Choice J: Yes, young animals do grow and develop
learn how to successfully into mature animals.
eliminate incorrect answer
choices.
Physical Science with Earth Science Introduction • 5
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.Task IV
Objective: To develop the ability to recognize, extract, and use all information
given within the test
At-Home Goal: To learn how to recognize and use all of the information given to you
in the questions
In-Class Goal: To share ideas and techniques for use all of the information given to
you in the questions
Task IV
At-Home Assignment Example 4
Write a list of the hardest Precipitation Amounts
questions. For each The chart shows Month Precipitation (cm)
question, write down all how much
March 10.63of the information given precipitation
April 11.47by the graphic and the there was for
each month.question. Note what May 14.68
There areinformation helped you June 9.32
differentanswer the question July 5.87 amounts forcorrectly. Write a
August 4.99 each month.question mark beside any
question or graphic that
you found confusing. According to the chart, which month had
the LEAST precipitation?
In-Class Assignment
f. MarchAs a class or in groups,
g. Maydiscuss each question.
Write down a list of all h. June
the informative j. August
observations you and
your peers make.
August was the month with the least
How It Will Help You precipitation. This is the correct answer choice.
Practicing understanding
charts and graphs and
analyzing the information
provided by the test will
help you to answer the
questions correctly.
6 • Introduction Physical Science with Earth Science
Copyright © Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.