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Aventures d'un jeune naturaliste. English

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440 pages
Project Gutenberg's Adventures of a Young Naturalist, by Lucien BiartThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.netTitle: Adventures of a Young NaturalistAuthor: Lucien BiartEditor: Parker GillmoreRelease Date: July 8, 2008 [EBook #26009]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK ADVENTURES OF A YOUNG NATURALIST ***Produced by Julia Miller, Emmy and the Online DistributedProofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This file wasproduced from images generously made available by TheInternet Archive/American Libraries.)ADVENTURESOFA YOUNG NATURALIST.BYLUCIEN BIART.Frontispiece. FRONTISPIECE. EDITED AND ADAPTED BYPARKER GILLMORE,AUTHOR OF "ALL ROUND THE WORLD," "GUN, ROD, AND SADDLE,""ACCESSIBLEFIELD SPORTS," ETC.WITH ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTEEN ILLUSTRATIONS.EmblemNEW YORK:HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS,FRANKLIN SQUARE.1871.PREFACE.There is no country on the face of the earth that possesses greater interest in the eyes of the scientific or travelled thanMexico, the scene where the adventures so graphically and clearly narrated in this volume transpired: nor is this partialityto be wondered at when we recall to memory what a lavish hand Nature has subtended to her.Although several of our most celebrated naturalists have climbed its ...
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Project Gutenberg's Adventures of a Young Naturalist,
by Lucien Biart
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no
cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,
give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg
License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: Adventures of a Young Naturalist
Author: Lucien Biart
Editor: Parker Gillmore
Release Date: July 8, 2008 [EBook #26009]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK
ADVENTURES OF A YOUNG NATURALIST ***
Produced by Julia Miller, Emmy and the Online
Distributed
Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This fileProofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This file
was
produced from images generously made available by
The
Internet Archive/American Libraries.)
ADVENTURES
OF
A YOUNG NATUR
ALIST.
BY
LUCIEN BIART.
Frontispiec
EDITED AND ADAPTED BY
e. Frontispi
ece.
PARKER GILLMORE,
AUTHOR OF "ALL ROUND THE WORL
D," "GUN, ROD, AND SADDLE," "ACCESSIBLE
FIELD SPORTS," ETC.
WITH ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTEE
N ILLUSTRATIONS.
Emblem
NEW YORK:
HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS,
FRANKLIN SQUARE.
1871.
PREFACE.
There is no country on the face of the earth that
possesses greater interest in the eyes of the scientific
or travelled than Mexico, the scene where the
adventures so graphically and clearly narrated in this
volume transpired: nor is this partiality to be wondered
at when we recall to memory what a lavish hand
Nature has subtended to her.
Although several of our most celebrated naturalists
have climbed its lofty volcanic mountains, explored its
lagoons and giant rivers, and traversed its immense
forests, still, from the vast extent of that country and
variety of climate—caused by difference of elevation—
much yet remains to be done ere the public become
thoroughly conversant with its arboreal and zoological
productions.The elephant, hippopotamus, lion, and tiger, the
largest and most formidable of the terrestrial
mammals of the Old World, are not here to be found;
but their places are well supplied by the swamp-loving
tapir, the voracious alligator, the stealthy puma, and
the blood-thirsty jaguar, all well worthy of the
sportsman's rifle, or of the snake-visioned native
warrior's weapons—for the power of destruction in
these animals during life is great, while after death
they either furnish valuable skins or wholesome food.
Moreover, here the wolf awakes the reverberating
echoes of the forest with its dismal howl; the raccoon,
opossum, and squirrel pass their lives in sportive
gambols; the wild and the ocellated turkeys strut
about, pompous in manner, as if conscious of their
handsome plumage, while the timid deer and shaggy-
coated bison roam over prairies or through woodland
glades, as yet unacquainted with the report of the
white man's destructive fire-arms.
Can it, therefore, be surprising that our little hero
should have craved to be permitted to have a sight of
this new land, so rich in the prospect of adventure?
How he behaved himself throughout the numerous
ordeals to which he was submitted, suffice it for me to
say that his conduct was worthy of the representative
of any nationality, and such as was calculated to make
all parents proud of their offspring; for whether
suffering from thirst or hunger, being persecuted by
noxious insects, straying in the woods, even when
within reach of the fiercest carnivora or in the
presence of the deadliest reptiles, he never for a
moment hesitated in performing his seniors'
instructions, lost his courage, or, better still, anopportunity of improving his mind.
That the young English reader may benefit as much
by the perusal of this work as Master Lucien,
otherwise "Sunbeam," did by his journey through the
Cordilleras of Mexico, and that they may enjoy the
information herein imparted upon the wonderful works
of the Creator, is the sincere wish of
The Editor.
Decoration
CONTENTS.
P
a
g
INTRODUCTION e

1
3
CHAPTER I.
Who we are.—Gringalet.—Sunrise.—The Sugar-can 2
e.—A Halt. 0
CHAPTER II.
Sugar.—Gringalet in the Molasses Tank.—L'Encuera 3
do's obstinate Idea.—An Indian Supper. 4
CHAPTER III.
Waking up in the Morning.—The pigmy World of Lillip
4
ut.—L'Encuerado and the Bottles.—Massacre of Thi
66
stles.—The Charcoal-burning Indians.
CHAPTER IV.
A difficult Ascent.—The Goat.—The Indian Girls.—T
6
he Tobacco-plant.—The Bull-fight.—Game.—Lucien'
1
s Gun.—Our Entry into the Wilderness.
CHAPTER V.
The great Forest.—Crows.—The first Bivouac.—The
7
Squirrel-hunt.—Our young Guide.—The Chant in the
6
Desert.
CHAPTER VI.
Coffee.—Turpentine.—Couroucous.—Pine-needles.
—Three Volcanoes in sight at once.—The Carabus F 8
amily.—Scorpions.—Salamanders.—A midnight Dist 9
urbance.
CHAPTER VII.
The Cats'-eyes Pomade.—Armadillo.—Lucien and th 1
e cruel Fern.—The fallen Mountain.—The Woodpeck 0
er.—The Basilisk.—L'Encuerado's fresh Idea. 4
CHAPTER VIII.
A Vulture's Feast.—Dragon's Blood.—A Coral Serpe 1
nt.—The Owl.—Mexican Moles.—Toucans.—The Sc 1
olopacidæ.—L'Encuerado turned Tailor.—Sunset. 9
CHAPTER IX.
The South Wind.—The Hurricane.—A fearful Night. 1
—The uprooted Giant.—The Sarsaparilla-plant.—Gri 3
ngalet discovers a Spring.—Our Bivouac. 5
CHAPTER X.The Rabbit.—Wild Potatoes.—A difficult Path.—An e 1
xtinct Crater.—Hoar-frost.—The Torrent.—The Fawn 4
.—The Tettigones.—Dragon-flies. 8
CHAPTER XI.
A blue Lizard.—The Guava-tree.—A Cataract.—Nest
1
of yellow Serpents.—A vegetable Helmet.—The King
6
fisher.—Hunting Water-fleas.—The Tadpole.—A Coll
4
ection of Water-bugs.
CHAPTER XII.
A Relation of Gringalet.—Our four-footed Guide.—A
1
Review of our Party.—The Alligator-tortoise.—The P
8
heasants.—The Magnolia.—The Nutmeg-tree.—The
2
Blue-plant.—The Caterpillar.
CHAPTER XIII.
The Sensitive-plant.—Gringalet and the Porcupine.— 1
The Mexican Chameleon.—The Kite and the Falcon. 9
—An amphisbæna Snake.—A Council of Turkeys. 6
CHAPTER XIV.
The Meteor.—God Almighty's Lanterns.—The Skunk
2
.—The Jalap plant.—An aerial Journey.—The Orchid
1
s.—Bivouac in the Mouth of a Cave.—Gringalet and
1
the Beetles.—A White Ants' Nest.
CHAPTER XV.
Our Substitutes for Lamps.—First Glance into the Ca
ve.—The Elaterides.—The Gothic Hall.—Stalagmites 2
and Stalactites.—A Chichiquimec Cemetery.—The "T 3
ree of St. Ignatius."—The Opossum and its little one 5
s.CHAPTER XVI.
The Earth-nuts.—A Wild-cat's Feast.—Another explo 2
ring Expedition to the Cave.—The Bats.—Excavation 5
s in a Tomb. 5
CHAPTER XVII.
2
A forced March.—Wild-ducks.—Vegetable Soap.—A
6
n unwelcome Guest.
9
CHAPTER XVIII.
Wild Dahlias.—A painful Misadventure.—The Euphor
2
bia Plants.—The Washer Raccoon.—Surprised by a
8
Torrent.—L'Encuerado turned Hat-maker.—New Met
2
hod for driving out Evil Spirits.—The Anhinga.
CHAPTER XIX.
2
The Black Iguana.—Another Country.—Reminiscenc
9
es of Childhood.—The Mirage.—A Fire in the Plain.
9
CHAPTER XX.
The Morning and Night Dew.—The Terre-Froide.—W
3
ater-spouts and Whirlwinds.—The Barbary Fig-trees.
1
—The Cactus-plants.—The Viznaga.—Our Hopes di
0
sappointed.—Don Benito Coyotepec.
CHAPTER XXI.
Black Skins and white Skins.—We have to turn Carp 3
enters.—L'Encuerado chanting and preaching.—The 2
Palm-leaves.—Vegetable Butter Tree. 6
CHAPTER XXII.
Mexican Oak-apples.—A Stream lost in an Abyss.—The Wild Nasturtium.—Sportsmen deceived by Child 3
ren.—The Grave-digging Beetles.—The Cochineal In 3
sect.—Mexican Wine.—Good-bye to our Indian Host 9
s.
CHAPTER XXIII.
Again on the Road.—The Bird-catching Spider.—The 3
Marten and the Skunk.—The Flying Squirrel.—The O 5
tter-hunt.—L'Encuerado wounded. 3
CHAPTER XXIV.
A laborious Task.—Wild Lime-trees.—Pigeons.—The 3
West India Cherry.—The Earwig.—Snakes and Serp 6
ents.—First Glance at the Terre-Chaude. 7
CHAPTER XXV.
A Ground-squirrel.—A Mouse's Nest.—Humming-bir 3
ds and their young ones.—The Locust-tree.—Mexica 7
n Wolves and their Retreat. 5
CHAPTER XXVI.
The Path through the Forest.—A forced March.—Th 3
e Bromelaceæ.—Mosquitoes.—The Water-plant.—T 8
he Promised Land.—A Band of Monkeys. 7
CHAPTER XXVII.
L'Encuerado and the Parrots.—Gringalet meets a Fri
4
end.—The Cougar, or American Lion.—A Stream.—
0
Our "Palm-tree Villa."—Turtles' Eggs.—The Tantalus
0
.—Herons and Flamingoes.
CHAPTER XXVIII.
A Grove of Logwood trees.—Ants at their Work.—Pa 4
rasitic Insects.—The Great Ant-eater.—Spoonbills an 1