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Lineage, Life and Labors of José Rizal, Philippine Patriot

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208 pages
The Project Gutenberg EBook of Lineage, Life and Labors of Jose Rizal: Philippine Patriot, by Austin Craig This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: Lineage, Life and Labors of Jose Rizal: Philippine Patriot Author: Austin Craig Release Date: January 8, 2005 [EBook #6867] Language: English Character set encoding: ASCII *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK LIFE OF JOSE RIZAL *** Produced by Jeroen Hellingman and the PG Distributed Proofreaders Team José Rizal Philippine Patriot Page iDulce Et Decorum Est Pro Patria Morir In the Philippine Islands the American Government has tried, and is trying, to carry out exactly what the greatest genius and most revered patriot ever known in the Philippines, José Rizal, steadfastly advocated, —Theodore Roosevelt, then President of the United States, in a public address at Fargo, N. D., April 7, 1903. Philippine Money and Postage Stamps, with the Rizal Portrait Page ii The Portrait of Rizal in 1883 Painted in Oil by Felix Resurreccion Hidalgo.
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Lineage, Life and Labors of Jose Rizal:
Philippine Patriot, by Austin Craig
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: Lineage, Life and Labors of Jose Rizal: Philippine Patriot
Author: Austin Craig
Release Date: January 8, 2005 [EBook #6867]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ASCII
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK LIFE OF JOSE RIZAL ***
Produced by Jeroen Hellingman and the PG Distributed Proofreaders Team
José Rizal
Philippine Patriot
Page iDulce Et Decorum Est Pro Patria Morir
In the Philippine Islands the American Government has tried, and is trying,
to carry out exactly what the greatest genius and most revered patriot ever
known in the Philippines, José Rizal, steadfastly advocated,
—Theodore Roosevelt, then President of the United States, in a public
address at Fargo, N. D., April 7, 1903.Philippine Money and Postage Stamps, with the Rizal PortraitPage ii
The Portrait of Rizal in 1883 Painted in Oil by Felix Resurreccion Hidalgo.
Page iii
Lineage Life and Labors
of
José RizalPhilippine Patriot
A Study of the Growth of Free
Ideas in the Trans-Pacific
American Territory
By
Austin Craig
Assistant Professor Oriental History
University of the Philippines
Author of “The Study of José Rizal,” “El Lineaje del Doctor
Rizal,” Etc.
Introduction by
James Alexander Robertson, L.H.D.
Manila
Philippine Education Company
1913
PPaaggee i v
Dedication
To the Philippine Youth
The subject of Doctor Rizal’s first prize-winning poem was The Philippine
Youth, and its theme was “Growth.” The study of the growth of free ideas,
as illustrated in this book of his lineage, life and labors, may therefore
fittingly be dedicated to the “fair hope of the fatherland.”
Except in the case of some few men of great genius, those who are
accustomed to absolutism cannot comprehend democracy. Therefore our
nation is relying on its young men and young women; on the rising,instructed generation, for the secure establishment of popular self-
government in the Philippines. This was Rizal’s own idea, for he said,
through the old philosopher in “Noli me Tangere,” that he was not writing
for his own generation but for a coming, instructed generation that would
understand his hidden meaning.
Your public school education gives you the democratic view-point, which
the genius of Rizal gave him; in the fifty-five volumes of the Blair-
Robertson translation of Philippine historical material there is available
today more about your country’s past than the entire contents of the British
Museum afforded him; and you have the guidance in the new paths that
Rizal struck out, of the life of a hero who, farsightedly or providentially, as
you may later decide, was the forerunner of the present régime.
But you will do as he would have done, neither accept anything because it
is written, nor reject it because it does not fall in with your prejudices—
Page vistudy out the truth for yourselves.
Introduction
In writing a biography, the author, if he be discriminating, selects, with
great care, the salient features of the life story of the one whom he deems
worthy of being portrayed as a person possessed of preëminent qualities
that make for a character and greatness. Indeed to write biography at all,
one should have that nice sense of proportion that makes him instinctively
seize upon only those points that do advance his theme. Boswell has given
the world an example of biography that is often wearisome in the extreme,
although he wrote about a man who occupied in his time a commanding
position. Because Johnson was Johnson the world accepts Boswell, and
loves to talk of the minuteness of Boswell’s portrayal, yet how many read
him, or if they do read him, have the patience to read him to the end?
In writing the life of the greatest of the Filipinos, Mr. Craig has displayed
judgment. Saturated as he is with endless details of Rizal’s life, he has had
the good taste to select those incidents or those phases of Rizal’s life that
exhibit his greatness of soul and that show the factors that were the most
potent in shaping his character and in controlling his purposes and actions.
A biography written with this chastening of wealth cannot fail to be
instructive and worthy of study. If one were to point out but a single benefit
that can accrue from a study of biography written as Mr. Craig has done
that of Rizal, he would mention, I believe, that to the character of the
student, for one cannot study seriously about men of character without
being affected by that study. As leading to an understanding of thecharacter of Rizal, Mr. Craig has described his ancestry with considerable
Page viifulness and has shown how the selective principle has worked through
successive generations. But he has also realized the value of the outside
influences and shows how the accidents of birth and nation affected by
environment plus mental vigor and will produced José Rizal. With a
strikingly meager setting of detail, Rizal has been portrayed from every side
and the reader must leave the biography with a knowledge of the elements
that entered into and made his life. As a study for the youth of the
Philippines, I believe this life of Rizal will be productive of good results.
Stimulation and purpose are presented (yet not didactically) throughout its
pages. One object of the author, I should say, has been to show how both
Philippine history and world history helped shape Rizal’s character.
Accordingly, he has mentioned many historical matters both of Philippine
and world-wide interest. One cannot read the book without a desire to
know more of these matters. Thus the book is not only a biography, it is a
history as well. It must give a larger outlook to the youth of the Philippines.
The only drawback that one might find in it, and it seems paradoxical to
say it, is the lack of more detail, for one leaves it wishing that he knew
more of the actual intimate happenings, and this, I take it, is the best effect a
biography can have on the reader outside of the instructive and moral value
of the biography.
James A. Robertson.
Page viiiManila, P. I.
Contents
Dedication. To the Philippine Youth
Introduction
I. America’s Forerunner
II. Rizal’s Chinese Ancestry
III. Liberalizing Hereditary Influences
IV. Rizal’s Early Childhood
V. Jagor’s Prophecy
VI. The Period of Preparation
VII. The Period of Propaganda
VIII. Despujol’s Duplicity
IX. The Deportation to Dapitan
X. Consummatum Est
XI. The After Life In Memory
Appendix. The Monkey and the TortoiseFrom Rizal’s sketch book.
Page ix
List of Illustrations
Portrait of Rizal Frontispiece Painted in oils by Felix Resurrection Hidalgo
(in color).
Philippine Money and Postage Stamps
Portrait of Rizal Painted in oils by Juan Luna in Paris. Facsimile (in
color).
Columbus at Barcelona From a print in Rizal’s scrapbook.
Portrait Group Rizal at thirteen. Rizal at eighteen. Rizal in London. The
portrait on the postage stamp.
The Baptismal Record of Domingo Lam-co Facsimile.
Portrait Group 1. In Luna’s home. 2. In 1890. 3. The portrait on the paper
money. 4. In 1891. 5. In 1892.
Pacific Ocean Spheres of Influence Made by Rizal during President
Harrison’s administration.
Father of Rizal Portrait.
Mother of Rizal Portrait.
Rizal’s Family-Tree Made by Rizal when in Dapitan.
Birthplace of José Rizal From a photograph.
Sketches by Rizal A group made during his travels.
Bust of Rizal’s Father Carved in wood by Rizal.The Church and Convento at Kalamba From a photograph.
Father Leoncio Lopez From a photograph.
Page xThe Lake District of Central Luzon Sketch made by Rizal.
Rizal’s Uncle, José Alberto From a photograph.
Sir John Bowring, K.C.B. From an old print.
José Del Pan of Manila From a photograph.
Governor De La Torre From an old print.
Archbishop Martinez From an old print.
The Very Rev. James Burgos, D.D. From a photograph.
Gen. F. T. Ward From a photograph.
Monument to the “Ever-Victorious” Army, Shanghai From a photograph.
Mrs. Rizal and Her Two Daughters From a photograph.
Bilibid Prison From an old print.
Model of a Head of a Dapitan Girl From a photograph.
Memorial to José Alberto in the Church at Biñan From a photograph.
Books from Rizal’s Library From a photograph.
Rizal’s Carving of the Sacred Heart From a photograph.
Bust of Father Guerrico, S. J. From a photograph.
Two Views of a Composite Statuette by Rizal From photographs.
Model in Clay of a Dapitan Woman From a photograph.
Sketch of Himself in the Training Class Photograph from the original.
Page xiOil Painting of Rizal’s Sister, Saturnina Photograph from the painting.
Rizal’s Parting View of Manila Pencil sketch by himself.
Sketches: 1. Singapore Lighthouse. 2. Along the Suez Canal. 3. Castle of
St. Elmo From Rizal’s sketch book.
Studies of Passengers on the French Mail Steamer From Rizal’s sketch
book.Aden, May 28, 1882 From Rizal’s sketch book.
Don Pablo Ortigas y Reyes From a photograph.
First Lines of a Poem by Rizal to Miss Reyes Facsimile.
Rizal in Juan Luna’s Studio in Paris From a photograph.
The Ruined Castle at Heidelberg From a photograph.
Dr. Rudolf Virchow From a photograph.
The House where Rizal Completed “Noli Me Tangere” From a
photograph.
Manuscript of “Noli Me Tangere” Facsimile.
Portrait of Dr. F. Blumentritt Pencil sketch by Rizal.
The Victory of Death over Life and of Science over Death Statuettes by
Rizal from photographs.
José T. De Andrade, Rizal’s Bodyguard From an old print.
José Maria Basa of Hongkong From a photograph.
Imitations of Japanese Art From Rizal’s sketch book.
Dr. Antonio Maria Regidor From a photograph.
Page xiiA “Wheel of Fortune” Answer Book Facsimile.
Dr. Reinhold Rost From a photograph.
A Page from Andersen’s Fairy Tales Translated by Rizal Facsimile.
Dedication of Rizal’s Translation of Andersen’s Fairy Tales Facsimile.
A Trilingual Letter by Rizal Facsimile.
Morga’s History in the British Museum From a photograph of the original.
Application, Recommendation and Admission to the British Museum From
photographs of the originals.
“La Solidaridad” From photograph of the original.
Staff of “La Solidaridad” From a photograph.
Rizal Fencing with Luna in Paris From a photograph.
General Weyler Known as “Butcher” Weyler From a photograph.Rizal’s Parents during the Land Troubles From photographs.
The Writ of Eviction against Rizal’s Father Facsimile of the original.
Room in which “El Filibusterismo” was Begun Pencil sketch by Rizal.
First Page of the Manuscript of “El Filibusterismo” Facsimile from the
original.
Cover of the Manuscript of “El Filibusterismo” Facsimile of the original.
Rizal’s Professional Card when in Hongkong Facsimile of the original.
Statuette Modeled by Rizal From a photograph.
Don Eulogio Despujol From an old print.
Page xiiiProposed Settlement in Borneo Facsimile of original sketch.
Rizal’s Passport or “Safe Conduct” Photograph of the original.
Part of Despujol’s Private Inquiry Facsimile of the original.
Case Secretly Filed against Rizal Facsimile of the original.
Luis De La Torre, Secretary to Despujol From an old print.
Regulations of La Liga Filipina Facsimile in Rizal’s handwriting.
The Calle Ilaya Monument to Rizal and La Liga Filipina From a
photograph.
Three New Species Discovered by Rizal and Named After Him From an
engraving.
Specimens Collected by Rizal and Father Sanchez From photographs.
Statuette by Rizal, The Mother’s Revenge From a photograph.
Father Sanchez, S. J. From a photograph.
Drawings of Fishes Caught at Dapitan Twelve facsimiles of Rizal’s
originals.
Plan of the Water Works for Dapitan Facsimile of Rizal’s sketch.
Jewelry of Earliest Moro Converts From a photograph.
Hill and Excavations where the Jewelry was Found Facsimile of a sketch
by Rizal.
List of Ethnographical Material Facsimile.