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MacMillan's Reading Books - Book V

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464 pages
The Project Gutenberg EBook of MacMillan's Reading Books, by AnonymousThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: MacMillan's Reading Books Book VAuthor: AnonymousRelease Date: February 22, 2004 [EBook #11230]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK MACMILLAN'S READING BOOKS ***Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Frank van Drogen and PG Distributed ProofreadersMACMILLAN'SREADING BOOKS.Book V.STANDARD V.ENGLISH CODE.For Ordinary Pass.Improved reading, and recitation of not less than seventy-five lines of poetry.N.B.—The passages for recitation may be taken from one or more standard authors, previously approved by theInspector. Meaning and allusions to be known, and, if well known, to atone for deficiencies of memory.For Special Grant (Art. 19, C. 1).Parsing, with analysis of a "simple" sentence.SCOTCH CODE.For Ordinary Pass.Reading, with expression, a short passage of prose or of poetry, with explanation, grammar, and elementary analysis ofsimple sentences.Specific Subject—English literature and language, 2nd year. (Art. 21 and Schedule IV., Scotch Code.)Three hundred lines of poetry, not before brought up, repeated; with knowledge of meaning and allusions, and of thederivations of words.PREFACE TO BOOK V.This seems a ...
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of MacMillan's
Reading Books, by Anonymous
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at
no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the
terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: MacMillan's Reading Books Book V
Author: Anonymous
Release Date: February 22, 2004 [EBook #11230]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG
EBOOK MACMILLAN'S READING BOOKS ***
Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Frank van Drogen
and PG Distributed ProofreadersMACMILLAN'S
READING BOOKS.
Book V.
STANDARD V.
ENGLISH CODE.
For Ordinary Pass.
Improved reading, and recitation of not less than
seventy-five lines of poetry.
N.B.—The passages for recitation may be taken
from one or more standard authors, previously
approved by the Inspector. Meaning and allusions
to be known, and, if well known, to atone for
deficiencies of memory.
For Special Grant (Art. 19, C. 1).
Parsing, with analysis of a "simple" sentence.SCOTCH CODE.
For Ordinary Pass.
Reading, with expression, a short passage of prose
or of poetry, with explanation, grammar, and
elementary analysis of simple sentences.
Specific Subject—English literature and language,
2nd year. (Art. 21 and Schedule IV., Scotch Code.)
Three hundred lines of poetry, not before brought
up, repeated; with knowledge of meaning and
allusions, and of the derivations of words.PREFACE TO BOOK V.
This seems a fitting place in which to explain the
general aim of this series of Reading Books.
Primarily, it is intended to provide a systematic
course for use in schools which are under State
inspection; and, with this view, each Book in the
series, after the Primer, is drawn up so as to meet
the requirements, as set forth in the English and
Scotch codes issued by the Committees of Council
on Education, of the Standard to which it
corresponds.
This special adaptation will not, it is hoped, render
the series less useful in other schools. The
graduated arrangement of the books, although,
perhaps, one to which every teacher may not
choose to conform, may yet serve as a test by
which to compare the attainments of the pupils in
any particular school with those which, according to
the codes, may be taken as the average expected
from the pupils in schools where the Standard
examination is, necessarily, enforced.
The general character of the series is literary, and
not technical. Scientific extracts have been
avoided. The teaching of special subjects is
separately recognised by the codes, and provided
for by the numerous special handbooks which have
been published. The separation of the reading
class from such teaching will prove a gain to both.
The former must aim chiefly at giving to the pupilsthe power of accurate, and, if possible, apt and
skilful expression; at cultivating in them a good
literary taste, and at arousing a desire of further
reading. All this, it is believed, can best be done
where no special or technical information has to be
extracted from the passages read.
In the earlier Books the subject, the language, and
the moral are all as direct and simple as possible.
As they advance, the language becomes rather
more intricate, because a studied simplicity, when
detected by the pupil, repels rather than attracts
him. The subjects are more miscellaneous; but still,
as far as possible, kept to those which can appeal
to the minds of scholars of eleven or twelve years
of age, without either calling for, or encouraging,
precocity. In Books II., III., and IV., a few old
ballads and other pieces have been purposely
introduced; as nothing so readily expands the mind
and lifts it out of habitual and sluggish modes of
thought, as forcing upon the attention the
expressions and the thoughts of an entirely
different time.
The last, or Sixth Book, may be thought too
advanced for its purpose. But, in the first place,
many of the pieces given in it, though selected for
their special excellence, do not involve any special
difficulties; and, in the second place, it will be seen
that the requirements of the English Code of 1875
in the Sixth Standard really correspond in some
degree to those of the special subject of English
literature, formerly recognised by the English, and
still recognised by the Scotch Code. Besides this,the Sixth Book is intended to supply the needs of
pupil teachers and of higher classes; and to be of
interest enough to be read by the scholar out of
school-hours, perhaps even after school is done
with altogether. To such it may supply the bare
outlines of English literature; and may, at least,
introduce them to the best English authors. The
aim of all the extracts in the book may not be fully
caught, as their beauty certainly cannot be fully
appreciated, by youths; but they may, at least,
serve the purpose of all education—that of
stimulating the pupil to know more.
The editor has to return his thanks for the kindness
by which certain extracts have been placed at his
disposal by the following authors and publishers:—
Mr. Ruskin and Mr. William Allingham; Mr. Nimmo
(for extract from Hugh Miller's works); Mr. Nelson
(for poems by Mr. and Mrs. Howitt); Messrs.
Edmonston and Douglas (for extract from Dasent's
"Tales from the Norse"); Messrs. Chapman and
Hall (for extracts from the works of Charles
Dickens and Mr. Carlyle); Messrs. Longmans,
Green, and Co. (for extracts from the works of
Macaulay and Mr. Froude); Messrs. Routledge and
Co. (for extracts from Miss Martineau's works); Mr.
Murray (for extracts from the works of Dean
Stanley); and many others.BOOK V.
CONTENTS.
Prose.
PREFACE
INTRODUCTION
INCIDENT IN THE LIFE OF DR. JOHNSON
Warner's Tour in the Northern
Counties.
THE OLD PHILOSOPHER AND THE YOUNG
LADY Jane Taylor
BARBARA S—— Charles Lamb
DR. ARNOLD Tom Brown's School Days
BOYHOOD'S WORK [ditto]
WORK IN THE WORLD [ditto]
CASTLES IN THE AIR Addison
THE DEATH OF NELSON SoutheyLEARNING TO RIDE T. Hughes
MOSES AT THE FAIR Goldsmith
WHANG THE MILLER [ditto]
AN ESCAPE Defoe's Robinson Crusoe
NECESSITY THE MOTHER OF INVENTION [ditto]
LABRADOR Southey's Omniana
GROWTH OF EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION IN THE
TWELFTH CENTURY Robertson
A WHALE HUNT Scott
A SHIPWRECK Charles Kingsley
THE BLACK PRINCE Dean Stanley
THE ASSEMBLY OF URI E.A. Freeman
MY WINTER GARDEN Charles Kingsley
ASPECTS OF NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN
COUNTRIES John Ruskin
COLUMBUS IN SIGHT OF LAND Washington
Irving
COLUMBUS SHIPWRECKED [ditto]
ROBBED IN THE DESERT Mungo Park
ARISTIDES Plutarch's Lives

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