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Works of Lucian of Samosata — Volume 03

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395 pages
The Project Gutenberg EBook of Works, V3, by Lucian of Samosata #3 in our series by Lucian of SamosataCopyright laws are changing all over the world. Be sure to check the copyright laws for your country before downloadingor redistributing this or any other Project Gutenberg eBook.This header should be the first thing seen when viewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do not remove it. Do notchange or edit the header without written permission.Please read the "legal small print," and other information about the eBook and Project Gutenberg at the bottom of thisfile. Included is important information about your specific rights and restrictions in how the file may be used. You can alsofind out about how to make a donation to Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved.**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts****eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971*******These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers!*****Title: Works, V3Author: Lucian of SamosataRelease Date: November, 2004 [EBook #6829] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was firstposted on January 28, 2003]Edition: 10Language: English*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK WORKS, V3 ***Produced by Robert Nield, Tom Allen, Charles Franks and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team.THE WORKS OF LUCIAN OF SAMOSATAComplete with exceptions specified in the prefaceTRANSLATED BYH. W. FOWLER AND F. G. FOWLERVOLUME IIIOF FOUR ...
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Works, V3, by
Lucian of Samosata #3 in our series by Lucian of
Samosata
Copyright laws are changing all over the world. Be
sure to check the copyright laws for your country
before downloading or redistributing this or any
other Project Gutenberg eBook.
This header should be the first thing seen when
viewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do not
remove it. Do not change or edit the header
without written permission.
Please read the "legal small print," and other
information about the eBook and Project
Gutenberg at the bottom of this file. Included is
important information about your specific rights and
restrictions in how the file may be used. You can
also find out about how to make a donation to
Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved.
**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla
Electronic Texts**
**eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By
Computers, Since 1971**
*****These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands
of Volunteers!*****
Title: Works, V3Author: Lucian of Samosata
Release Date: November, 2004 [EBook #6829]
[Yes, we are more than one year ahead of
schedule] [This file was first posted on January 28,
2003]
Edition: 10
Language: English
*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG
EBOOK WORKS, V3 ***
Produced by Robert Nield, Tom Allen, Charles
Franks and the Online Distributed Proofreading
Team.THE WORKS OF LUCIAN OF
SAMOSATA
Complete with exceptions specified in the preface
TRANSLATED BY
H. W. FOWLER AND F. G. FOWLER
VOLUME III
OF FOUR VOLUMES
What work nobler than transplanting foreign
thought into the barren domestic soil? except
indeed planting thought of your own, which the
fewest are privileged to do.—Sartor Resartus.
At each flaw, be this your first thought: the author
doubtless said something quite different, and much
more to the point. And then you may hiss me off, if
you will.—LUCIAN, Nigrinus, 9.
(LUCIAN) The last great master of Attic eloquence
and Attic wit.— Lord Macaulay.CONTENTS OF VOL. III
LIFE OF DEMONAX
A PORTRAIT-STUDY
DEFENCE OF THE 'PORTRAIT-STUDY'
TOXARIS: A DIALOGUE OF FRIENDSHIP
ZEUS CROSS-EXAMINED
ZEUS TRAGOEDUS
THE COCK
ICAROMENIPPUS, AN AERIAL EXPEDITION
THE DOUBLE INDICTMENT
THE PARASITE, A DEMONSTRATION THAT
SPONGING IS A PROFESSION
ANACHARSIS, A DISCUSSION OF PHYSICAL
TRAINING
OF MOURNINGOF MOURNING
THE RHETORICIAN'S VADE MECUM
THE LIAR
DIONYSUS, AN INTRODUCTORY LECTURE
HERACLES, AN INTRODUCTORY LECTURE
SWANS AND AMBER
THE FLY, AN APPRECIATION
REMARKS ADDRESSED TO AN ILLITERATE
BOOK-FANCIER
ALPHABETICAL TABLE OF CONTENTSLIFE OF DEMONAX
It was in the book of Fate that even this age of
ours should not be destitute entirely of noteworthy
and memorable men, but produce a body of
extraordinary power, and a mind of surpassing
wisdom. My allusions are to Sostratus the
Boeotian, whom the Greeks called, and believed to
be, Heracles; and more particularly to the
philosopher Demonax. I saw and marvelled at both
of them, and with the latter I long consorted. I have
written of Sostratus elsewhere [Footnote: The life
of Sostratus is not extant.], and described his
stature and enormous strength, his open-air life on
Parnassus, sleeping on the grass and eating what
the mountain afforded, the exploits that bore out
his surname—robbers exterminated, rough places
made smooth, and deep waters bridged.
This time I am to write of Demonax, with two
sufficient ends in view: first, to keep his memory
green among good men, as far as in me lies; and
secondly, to provide the most earnest of our rising
generation, who aspire to philosophy, with a
contemporary pattern, that they may not be forced
back upon the ancients for worthy models, but
imitate this best—if I am any judge—of all
philosophers.
He came of a Cyprian family which enjoyed
considerable property and political influence. But
his views soared above such things as these; heclaimed nothing less than the highest, and devoted
himself to philosophy. This was not due to any
exhortations of Agathobulus, his predecessor
Demetrius, or Epictetus. He did indeed enjoy the
converse of all these, as well as of Timocrates of
Heraclea, that wise man whose gifts of expression
and of understanding were equal. It was not,
however, to the exhortations of any of these, but to
a natural impulse towards the good, an innate
yearning for philosophy which manifested itself in
childish years, that he owed his superiority to all
the things that ordinary men pursue. He took
independence and candour for his guiding
principles, lived himself an upright, wholesome,
irreproachable life, and exhibited to all who saw or
heard him the model of his own disposition and
philosophic sincerity.
He was no half-baked enthusiast either; he had
lived with the poets, and knew most of them by
heart; he was a practised speaker; he had a
knowledge of philosophic principles not of the
superficial skin-deep order; he had developed and
hardened his body by exercise and toil, and, in
short, had been at the pains to make himself every
man's equal at every point. He was consistent
enough, when he found that he could no longer
suffice to himself, to depart voluntarily from life,
leaving a great reputation behind him among the
true nobility of Greece.
Instead of confining himself to a single philosophic
school, he laid them all under contribution, without
showing clearly which of them he preferred; butperhaps he was nearest akin to Socrates; for,
though he had leanings as regards externals and
plain living to Diogenes, he never studied effect or
lived for the applause and admiration of the
multitude; his ways were like other people's; he
mounted no high horse; he was just a man and a
citizen. He indulged in no Socratic irony; but his
discourse was full of Attic grace; those who heard
it went away neither disgusted by servility nor
repelled by ill-tempered censure, but on the
contrary lifted out of themselves by charity, and
encouraged to more orderly, contented, hopeful
lives.
He was never known to shout or be over vehement
or angry, even when he had to correct; he touched
offences, but pardoned offenders, saying that the
doctors' was the right model, who treat sickness
but are not angry with the sick. It is human, he
thought, to err, but divine (whether in God or man)
to put the error right.
A life of this sort left him without wants of his own;
but he was always ready to render any proper
service to his friends—including reminders to those
among them who passed for fortunate, how brief
was their tenure of what they so prided themselves
upon. To all, on the other hand, who repined at
poverty, resented exile, or complained of old age
or bad health, he administered laughing
consolation, and bade them not forget how soon
their troubles would be over, the distinction
between good and bad be obsolete, and long
freedom succeed to short-lived distress.

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