Numerical simulation of acoustic streaming on SAW-driven biochips [Elektronische Ressource] / vorgelegt von Daniel Köster

Publié par

Numerical Simulation ofAcoustic Streamingon SAW-driven BiochipsDissertation zur Erlangung des Doktorgrades derMathematisch-Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultat derUniversit at Augsburgvorgelegt von Daniel K osterJuni 2006Erster Gutachter: Prof. Dr. K. G. Siebert, Augsburg, DeutschlandZweiter Gutachter: Prof. Dr. R. H. W. Hoppe, Augsburg, DeutschlandDritter Gutachter: Prof. Dr. A. Wixforth, Augsburg, DeutschlandVierter Gutachter: Prof. Dr. P. Morin, Santa Fe, ArgentinienMundliche Pruf ung: 18. Oktober, 2006iiiIchmochteandieserStelleeinigenMenschenmeinenDankaussprechen, diezum erfolgreichen Gelingen dieser Arbeit beigetragen haben.AnersterStellem ochteichmeinemDoktorvaterKunibertG.Siebertdanken,der mich auf dieses spannende und aktuelle Thema gebracht hat und mir stetshervorragende Betreuung geboten hat. Weiterhin danke ich allen Kollegen,vor allem Oliver Kriessl und Christian Kreuzer, welche immer fur Fragen undverruckte Einallf e die beruhmten fun f Minuten Zeit hatten.ivContents1 Introduction 11.1 Outline of the thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.2 Notation and function spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31.2.1 Spaces on bounded domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31.2.2 Lipschitz domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51.2.3 Further spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Physical background and modeling 92.1 Fluid manipulation using SAWs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Publié le : lundi 1 janvier 2007
Lecture(s) : 78
Tags :
Source : WWW.OPUS-BAYERN.DE/UNI-AUGSBURG/VOLLTEXTE/2007/511/PDF/KOESTER_DISS.PDF
Nombre de pages : 154
Voir plus Voir moins

Numerical Simulation of
Acoustic Streaming
on SAW-driven Biochips
Dissertation zur Erlangung des Doktorgrades der
Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultat der
Universit at Augsburg
vorgelegt von Daniel K oster
Juni 2006Erster Gutachter: Prof. Dr. K. G. Siebert, Augsburg, Deutschland
Zweiter Gutachter: Prof. Dr. R. H. W. Hoppe, Augsburg, Deutschland
Dritter Gutachter: Prof. Dr. A. Wixforth, Augsburg, Deutschland
Vierter Gutachter: Prof. Dr. P. Morin, Santa Fe, Argentinien
Mundliche Pruf ung: 18. Oktober, 2006iii
IchmochteandieserStelleeinigenMenschenmeinenDankaussprechen, die
zum erfolgreichen Gelingen dieser Arbeit beigetragen haben.
AnersterStellem ochteichmeinemDoktorvaterKunibertG.Siebertdanken,
der mich auf dieses spannende und aktuelle Thema gebracht hat und mir stets
hervorragende Betreuung geboten hat. Weiterhin danke ich allen Kollegen,
vor allem Oliver Kriessl und Christian Kreuzer, welche immer fur Fragen und
verruckte Einallf e die beruhmten fun f Minuten Zeit hatten.ivContents
1 Introduction 1
1.1 Outline of the thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.2 Notation and function spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.2.1 Spaces on bounded domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.2.2 Lipschitz domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.2.3 Further spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2 Physical background and modeling 9
2.1 Fluid manipulation using SAWs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.2 Overview of the uidics problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.3 Acoustic streaming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.3.1 Physical origin of acoustic streaming . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.3.2 Acoustic subproblem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.3.3 Acoustic streaming subproblem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.3.4 Free capillary boundaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.4 Dimensionless formulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.4.1 Acoustic subproblem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
2.4.2 Acoustic streaming subproblem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.4.3 Free capillary boundaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
3 Analysis of the subproblems 19
3.1 Problems on xed domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
3.1.1 Solution spaces and variational formulation . . . . . . . . 21
3.2 Solvability results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
3.2.1 Existence and uniqueness of the stationary problem . . . 25
3.2.2 Existence and uniqueness of time dependent solutions . . 25
3.2.3 Existence and uniqueness of periodic solutions . . . . . . 26
3.2.4 Oscillating equilibrium states . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
3.3 Quasi-stationary approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
3.4 Some generalizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
3.4.1 Inhomogeneous velocity boundary conditions . . . . . . . 42
3.4.2 Pressure with arbitrary mean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
4 Numerical discretization 57
4.1 Finite elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
4.1.1 Triangulations and nite element spaces . . . . . . . . . . 57
vvi CONTENTS
4.1.2 Lagrange and Taylor-Hood elements . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
4.1.3 Properties of the Taylor-Hood element . . . . . . . . . . . 61
4.2 Discretized problems on xed domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
4.2.1 Stationary problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
4.2.2 Quasi-stationary approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
4.2.3 Instationary problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
4.2.4 Periodic problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
5 Free boundary problems 75
5.1 Free capillary boundaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
5.1.1 Free boundaries and acoustic streaming . . . . . . . . . . 75
5.1.2 Variational formulation including curvature . . . . . . . . 76
5.2 Discretization of free boundary problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
5.2.1 Concepts of moving nite elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
5.2.2 Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
6 Details of the implementation 87
6.1 E cient solution of linear systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
6.1.1 Sample derivation of a linear system . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
6.1.2 Krylov space methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
6.1.3 Preconditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
6.2 Saddle point solvers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
6.3 Overview of algorithms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
6.3.1 Fixed meshes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
6.3.2 Free capillary boundaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
6.4 Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
7 Numerical Results 105
7.1 Test problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
7.1.1 Fixed domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
7.1.2 Free boundaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
7.2 Realistic problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
7.2.1 Fixed domains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
7.2.2 Free boundaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
7.3 Physical experiments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
7.3.1 Experimental layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
7.3.2 Particle tracking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
7.3.3 Streaming velocity versus SAW amplitude . . . . . . . . . 136
7.3.4 Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
7.4 Conclusions and outlook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
A Bibliography 141
B Reference of notation and symbols 147Chapter 1
Introduction
The last decades have seen unprecedented advances in the production of minia-
turized electronic circuits, from the leviathan computers lling entire rooms in
the humble beginnings to the powerful and omnipresent microchips of today. A
similar revolution under the motto “smaller is better” is currently taking place
inthelifesciencesregardingthemanipulationof uids,withthetransitionfrom
test tubes and beakers to micropipettes and microtitre plates.
Incontrasttotheeldofmicroelectronicswheretheaimisstilltoreducethe
sizeoftransistors,inmicro uidicsthemainconcernnowadaysistomanufacture
increasingly complex systems of channels with sophisticated pumps, valves,
mixers, separators, and lters, allonascaleofmicrometers. Apopularconcept
today is known as lab-on-a-chip. The goal of a lab-on-a-chip is the integration
2of a complete analysis and reaction system on a small surface (1cm or less).
A sample device is shown in Figure 1.1 below.
There are many reasons for desiring small scale. Less energy and lesser
amounts of expensive reagents are needed, reducing costs. Devices can be
used in parallel and with automatic control, useful in applications such as gene
sequencing. From the physical point of view we have more e cient heat and
material transport, leading to better yields and faster analysis.
Despite all of these promising aspects there are certain technical di culties
arising in the production of micro uidic components. Speci cally, the task of
performing controlled pumping or mixing of nano- or picoliter quantities of
uids becomes di cult. For instance, the low Reynolds number of typical ows
on this scale signi es that ows in this regime are laminar and not turbulent.
This is an obstacle in designing a component to mix reagents.
Anoveltypeofmicro uidicbiochipemployssurfacewavesasadrivingforce.
The key of this technology is a pump able to position reagents on the surface of
chips or in micro uidic channels without mechanical contact. This is achieved
usingsurfaceacousticwavesinducedusingradiofrequencyelectricsignals. The
waves arise through the use of piezoelectric substrate materials in the chip,
e.g. lithium niobate. The electromagnetic signal is e ciently converted into
an elastic wave con ned to the surface layer of the substrate, hence Surface
Acoustic Wave (SAW).
The interaction of these waves with the uid leads to streaming patterns
1

Soyez le premier à déposer un commentaire !

17/1000 caractères maximum.