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Frost & Sullivan: Electric Vehicles Power to the Forefront of Sustainable, Smart Mobility in Central and Eastern Europe

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Frost & Sullivan: Electric Vehicles Power to the Forefront of Sustainable, Smart Mobility in Central and Eastern Europe PR Newswire LONDON, June 12, 2012 - Market Set to Unveil its Potential by 2014-2015 with Backing of Full- scale Government Incentives and Significantly Reduced EV Prices LONDON, June 12, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Electric vehicle (EV) sales in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), a region with a population of over 100 million people and a solid macroeconomic environment, are anticipated to cross the 60,000 mark by 2017 and witness even stronger growth post 2017, generating revenue opportunities for existing and new market participants in the e-mobility area. New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.automotive.frost.com), 360 Degree Perspective Of The Central And Eastern European Electric Vehicle Industry, finds that the industry is expected to reach unit shipments of around 62,000 units by 2017, increasing from approximately 245 unit shipments in 2011 due to increasing demand for convenient, eco-efficient and sustainable mobility solutions predominantly in dynamically developing urban areas as well as due to anticipated optimisation of the supply chain and, therefore, substantial EV cost reductions. "Rising personal incomes, the process of urban sprawl and changing mobility preferences in CEE are fuelling the demand for new sustainable solutions in personal mobility," notes Frost & Sullivan Senior Consultant Vitaly Belskiy.
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Frost & Sullivan: Electric Vehicles Power to the
Forefront of Sustainable, Smart Mobility in
Central and Eastern Europe
PR Newswire
LONDON, June 12, 2012
- Market Set to Unveil its Potential by 2014-2015 with Backing of Full-
scale Government Incentives and Significantly Reduced EV Prices
LONDON
,
June 12, 2012
/PRNewswire/ -- Electric vehicle (EV) sales in Central
and
Eastern Europe
(CEE), a region with a population of over 100 million people
and a solid macroeconomic environment, are anticipated to cross the 60,000
mark by 2017 and witness even stronger growth post 2017, generating revenue
opportunities for existing and new market participants in the e-mobility area.
New analysis from Frost & Sullivan (http://www.automotive.frost.com),
360
Degree Perspective Of The Central And Eastern European Electric
Vehicle Industry
, finds that the industry is expected to reach unit shipments
of around 62,000 units by 2017, increasing from approximately 245 unit
shipments in 2011 due to increasing demand for convenient, eco-efficient and
sustainable mobility solutions predominantly in dynamically developing urban
areas as well as due to anticipated optimisation of the supply chain and,
therefore, substantial EV cost reductions.
"Rising personal incomes, the process of urban sprawl and changing mobility
preferences in CEE are fuelling the demand for new sustainable solutions in
personal mobility," notes Frost & Sullivan Senior Consultant Vitaly Belskiy. "This
will catalyse the development of the EV market until 2017."
Pragmatic enthusiasm is set to be the dominant approach as customers and
market participants seek convenient urban mobility solutions which can support
cost- effective total cost of ownership over the lifecycle of vehicles, both for
private as well as business customers. However, there is still a 35-40 per cent
price reduction potential which can be achieved in 2-3 years when it comes to
battery technology, which means cost factors will diminish in impact on the
industry's development.
Frost & Sullivan estimates the EV market to grow at a phenomenal 151 per cent
over 2011-2017. The highest growth is expected after 2014-2015 assuming full-
scale government incentives – including CO2-based taxation of new vehicles
and the ability to use bus lanes which is expected to appeal specifically to
corporate fleets – are in place in most countries across CEE.
However, the lack of government support (especially soft incentives, such as
the ability to use bus lanes and free parking) in the short-term is expected to
restrain industry growth potential. Financial subsidies are not expected to have
a strong direct impact on the industry, yet appear to be necessary in order to
catalyse its development at the initial stage.
"When it comes to long-term development of charging infrastructure for EVs,
CEE will have to face similar challenges to Western European countries – safety
of charging process, network management and financial transactions services,
among others," cautions Belskiy. "However, setting up a charging infrastructure
in CEE in residential areas, where most charging is likely to be done, will require