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Penn Foster Exam Answers 986008 Interpreting What You Read

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penn foster exam answers 986008 Penn Foster Exam Answers 986008 Interpreting What You Read Click Here to Instantly Download exam 986008 OR COPY & PASTE: http://instantanswerplace.com/penn-foster-exam-answers-986008-interpreting-what-you-read/ Penn Foster Exam Answers TUTORIAL: Includes final exam guide with answers for final exam. Individual Assignment: Interpreting What You Read 986008 986008RR Penn Foster Answers 986008RR 986008 Interpreting What You Read Instantly Download PF High School exam answers, PF Career school exam answers, exam guides and more! Get Better Grades Spending LESS Time! Are you stressed out trying to juggle school, work, friends, family, and a million catastrophes that just seem to pop up when you finally get a chance to study? Attending school online seems like a perfect solution to taking control of your life until it takes over your life. InstantAnswerPlace.com gives you the freedom to instantly download the help you need NOW! The research is already done for you and gives you a jump start on your studies. Look, we all get frustrated when we know we are running into the eleventh hour of a deadline. Sometimes all it takes is a quick exam guide to relieve the negative self-talk, frustration, and panic caused by the little emergencies of everyday school life. Take full control of your high school and career goals with InstantAnswerPlace.com! SAMPLE PRACTICE EXAM QUESTIONS IN STUDY GUIDE 1.
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  SAMPLE PRACTICE EXAM QUESTIONS IN STUDY GUIDE 1. Which one of the following statements contains a simile? A. The woods went up in flame. B. The maple wears a gayer scarf. C. The soaring bird quickly disappeared from our sight. D. I think that I shall never see a poem lovely as a tree.   This question is based on the following information about The Call of the Wild, a book by Jack London. The Call of the Wild is a story about a dog named Buck. Buck is a pampered dog who lives with a wealthy family in southern California. During the Gold Rush, Buck is captured, sold, and eventually shipped to Alaska to work as a sled dog. Along the way, Buck is mistreated by a series of owners. Eventually he learns to survive as a member of a dog sled team. As a result, Buck soon realizes that in the Yukon of Alaska, "the law of club and fang" is stronger than the rules of civilized society. With each new experience, Buck becomes more acquainted with his primitive past. Finally, after losing the one person who treated Buck well, Buck decides to return to living in the wild.
  2. From the information above, which one of the following headlines would best represent the theme of Jack London's story? A. Pampered Dog Moves to Alaska B. Dog Learns the Ropes of Sled Teams C. Dog Mistreated by Owners D. Dog's Roots Call Him Back   This question is based on the following four sentences. 1. Netta and Jim argued over their views of free trade. 2. Netta and Jim had different views on free trade. 3. Netta and Jim were sharply split over the issue of free trade. 4. Netta and Jim refused to discuss the issue of free trade.   3. In these four sentences, the word that's most obviously a loaded word is A. sharply. B. different. C. argued. D. refused.   4. Which one of the following sentences best explains the term bias? A. Bias exchanges a negative opinion for a positive one. B. Bias is a negative opinion. C. Bias is an interpretation of something. D. Bias is an opinion that favors one point of view.   
This question is based on the following passage. According to science, the fastest speed possible for anything is the speed of light. The speed of light is about 186,000 miles per second. That means that in one minute, light travels 11,160,000 miles. The star nearest Earth is the Sun. It's about 93,000,000 miles from Earth. Therefore, it takes sunlight about eight minutes to travel to Earth. So, when you see the Sun, you aren't seeing it as it is. You're seeing it as it was eight minutes ago. Since the stars are much farther away than our Sun, imagine how far back in time you're seeing them! It's obvious that humans will never travel to planets around even the nearest stars.   5. Which statement taken from the paragraph is most likely to be opinion rather than fact? A. Humans will never travel to planets around even the nearest stars. B. When you see the Sun, you aren't seeing it as it is. C. The star nearest Earth is the Sun. D. The fastest speed possible for anything is the speed of light.   
6. Which one of the following statements contains bias? A. The employees whined about their low wages. B. It had rained for three days straight.
C. The budget was reduced by $3,000. D. Charles left for California on the 6:00 A.M. flight.   This question is based on the following passage.   Except for a few pigeons, Central Park was deserted. Mist hung above the chilled grass. Patches of old snow, scattered here and there, looked like white puddles. The sun hung just above the horizon, casting red and orange streaks across low-hanging clouds. The portly, gray-haired gentleman jogging down the path looked out of place. For one thing, he was dressed in ordinary street clothes, not a sweat suit. Also, every few seconds, he looked anxiously back over his shoulder. Coming closer to me, I saw that his face was flushed. He was panting, almost gasping. Abruptly, looking this way and that, he moved behind a tree. Seeming not to notice my presence, he stood with his back against the trunk, panting heavily. After a moment, he poked his head out to survey the path. It was still empty, except for a squirrel that dashed across the path like a furry dart. I checked my watch. It was now 7:30. Mentally marking the time, I aimed my camera toward the man's face.   7. In this paragraph, a white puddle is a simile for A. mist.
B. grass. C. snow. D. fear.   This question based on the "The Little Match Girl," which you read in this study unit.   8. What is the setting of "The Little Match Girl"? A. The matchseller's attic home
B. The matchseller's grandmother's house C. A wintry city street D. A place in the matchseller's imagination   9. Suppose the following sentence appears in the sports section of the newspaper: Lorton's experienced linemen performed well in handing Jefferson High's Eagles a crushing defeat.   What word in the sentence is most clearly a loaded word? A. Crushing B. Defeat C. Experienced D. Handing   
This question is based on the following poem: Seasons are celebrations. A year's a Ferris wheel.
Both honor our world's habit of spinning 'round a star.   10. In the first line of the poem, the poet is using a A. simile. B. loaded word. C. bias. D. metaphor.   This question based on the "The Little Match Girl," which you read in this study unit.   11. Who is the protagonist in "The Little Match Girl"? A. The little match girl's cruel father B. The little match girl's grandmother C. The passerby who finds the little girl's body D. The little match girl   This question is based on the following paragraph. (1) After my interview with these four young people, I reflected on the quiet sense of "difference" I sensed with many of these Upward Bound students. (2) As a college teacher who has also taught seventh-grade science, I have some experience with the faces and attitudes of adolescence. (3) Upward Bound students had those faces. (4) There was the puzzled coping with changing bodies—hormone hell. (5) There was ambivalence about "authority figures" and uncertainties about whether or not the world would have some place for them. (6) There were the studied rationalizations about lapses on homework assignments, moments of despair, adolescent angst—all of that. (7) But there was also that "difference." (8) Maybe it's one part knowing people care and one part beginning to trust the future. (9) I wasn't sure. (Turner, "Onward and Upward: Upward Bound Helps Open College Doors," Virginia Journal of Education, June 1992. Adapted as fair usage.)
  12. Which statement best summarizes the conclusion one may draw from this passage? A. It is clear that positive role models and emotional support are keys to success. B. Adolescents need a firm hand. C. One can draw no conclusions about the "difference" shown by Upward Students D. The "difference" may result from emotional support and increased self-confidence.   This question is based on the following passage. Except for a few pigeons, Central Park was deserted. Mist hung above the chilled grass. Patches of old snow, scattered here and there, looked like white puddles. The sun hung just above the horizon, casting red and orange streaks across low-hanging clouds. The portly, gray-haired gentleman jogging down the path looked out of place. For one thing, he was dressed in ordinary street clothes, not a sweat suit. Also, every few seconds, he looked anxiously back over his shoulder. Coming closer to me, I saw that his face was flushed. He was panting, almost gasping. Abruptly, looking this way and that, he moved behind a tree. Seeming not to notice my presence, he stood with his back against the trunk, panting heavily.
After a moment, he poked his head out to survey the path. It was still empty, except for a squirrel that dashed across the path like a furry dart. I checked my watch. It was now 7:30. Mentally marking the time, I aimed my camera toward the man's face.
  13. From this paragraph, what relationship can you infer between the jogger and the writer? A. They are complete strangers to each other. B. The writer is in danger from the jogger. C. They are well known to each other. D. The writer is observing a typical jogger.
  This question is based on the following sentence. Detective Simon Levant had the unconscious habit of caressing his moustache while pondering evidence.   14. Which element of an effective fictional narrative does this sentence best represent? A. Theme B. Plot C. Characterization D. Conflict   This question is based on the following poem: Seasons are celebrations. A year's a Ferris wheel. Both honor our world's habit of spinning 'round a star.   15. Which one of the following sentences best expresses the main idea of this poem? A. The world has a habit of spinning around. B. Seasons and Ferris wheels are like Earth's journey around the sun. C. There are four seasons in a year. D. Season are celebrations, while a year on Earth is a habit.   16. Opinion often shows bias. Therefore, it's good to remember that a fact is different from an opinion because a fact can be proved or disproved with A. opinions. B. imagery. C. evidence. D. bias.   This question is based on the following passage. Except for a few pigeons, Central Park was deserted. Mist hung above the chilled grass. Patches of old snow, scattered here and there, looked like white puddles. The sun hung just above the horizon, casting red and orange streaks across low-hanging clouds. The portly, gray-haired gentleman jogging down the path looked out of place. For one thing, he was dressed in ordinary street clothes, not a sweat suit. Also, every few seconds, he looked anxiously back over his
shoulder. Coming closer to me, I saw that his face was flushed. He was panting, almost gasping. Abruptly, looking this way and that, he moved behind a tree. Seeming not to notice my presence, he stood with his back against the trunk, panting heavily. After a moment, he poked his head out to survey the path. It was still empty, except for a squirrel that dashed across the path like a furry dart. I checked my watch. It was now 7:30. Mentally marking the time, I aimed my camera toward the man's face.   17. From the paragraph, you can conclude that the portly man is afraid of something. Which one of the following elements gives the strongest evidence for that conclusion? A. He's panting. B. He isn't dressed in a jogging suit. C. He's running in a nearly deserted park. D. He hides behind a tree.   18. The purpose of loaded words in advertisements is to A. illustrate bias. B. influence the reader. C. create an image. D. compare two unlike things.   19. Below is the last stanza of a poem, "Dover Beach," written in 1876 by Matthew Arnold.   Ah, love, let us be true To one another! for the world, which seems To lie before us like a land of dreams, So various, so beautiful, so new, Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light, Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain; And we are here as on a darkling plain Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight, Where ignorant armies clash by night.   
Which one of the following statements best characterizes Arnold's view of the world? A. The world is not a beautiful place. B. The world is made for lovers. C. The world is a confusing and hostile place. D. The world is just a dream.   This question is based on the following paragraph. (1) After my interview with these four young people, I reflected on the quiet sense of "difference" I sensed with many of these Upward Bound students. (2) As a college teacher who has also taught seventh-grade science, I have some experience with the faces and attitudes of adolescence. (3) Upward Bound students had those faces. (4) There was the puzzled coping with changing bodies—hormone hell. (5) There was ambivalence about "authority figures" and uncertainties
about whether or not the world would have some place for them. (6) There were the studied rationalizations about lapses on homework assignments, moments of despair, adolescent angst—all of that. (7) But there was also that "difference." (8) Maybe it's one part knowing people
care and one part beginning to trust the future. (9) I wasn't sure. (Turner, "Onward and Upward: Upward Bound Helps Open College Doors," Virginia Journal of Education, June 1992. Adapted as fair usage.)
20. Which sentence in the passage can best be considered factual? A. Sentence 2 B. Sentence 3 C. Sentence 5 D. Sentence 4
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