Ceremony
34 pages
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Ceremony

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34 pages
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Ceremony

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Publié le 08 décembre 2010
Nombre de lectures 55
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Oxford Degree Ceremony, by Joseph Wells This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: The Oxford Degree Ceremony Author: Joseph Wells Release Date: February 26, 2010 [EBook #31408] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE OXFORD DEGREE CEREMONY ***
Produced by Graeme Mackreth and The Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This file was produced from images generously made available by The Internet Archive/American Libraries.)
The Oxford Degree Ceremony By J. Wells Fellow of Wadham College
Oxford At the Clarendon Press 1906
HENRY FROWDE, M.A. PUBLISHER TO THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD LONDON, EDINBURGH NEW YORK AND TORONTO
PREFACE The object of this little book is to attempt to set forth the meaning of our forms and ceremonies, and to show[Pg iii] how much of University history is involved in them. It naturally makes no pretensions to independent research; I have simply tried to make popular the results arrived at in Dr. Rashdall's great book on theUniversities of the Middle Ages, and in the Rev. Andrew Clark's invaluableRegister of the University of Oxford(published by the Oxford Historical Society). My obligations to these two books will be patent to all who know them; it has not, however, seemed necessary to give definite references either to these or to Anstey'sMunimenta Academica(Rolls Series), which also has been constantly used. I have tried as far as possible to introduce the language of the statutes, whether past or present; the forms actually used in the degree ceremony itself are given in Latin and translated; in other cases a rendering has usually been given, but sometimes the original has been retained, when the words were either technical or[Pg iv] such as would be easily understood by all. The illustrations, with which the Clarendon Press has furnished the book, are its most valuable part. Every Oxford man, who cares for the history of his University, will be glad to have the reproduction of the portrait of the fourteenth-century Chancellor and of the University seal. I have to thank Dr. Rashdall and the Rev. Andrew Clark for most kindly reading through my chapters, and for several suggestions, and Professor Oman for special help in the Appendix on 'The University Staves'. J.W.
CONTENTS CHAPTER I THEDEGREECEREMONY CHAPTER II THEMEANING OF THEDEGREECEREMONY CHAPTER III THEPRELIMINARIES OF THEDEGREECEREMONY CHAPTER IV THEOFFICERS OF THEUNIVERSITY CHAPTER V UNIVERSITYDRESS CHAPTER VI THEPLACES OF THEDEGREECEREMONY APPENDIX I THEPUBLICASSEMBLIES OF THEUNIVERSITY OFOXFORD
APPENDIX II THEUNIVERSITYSTAVES INDEX
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
THEORIGINALSONIANHELD THEUNIVERSITYSEAL (The seal dates from the fourteenth century and is kept by the Proctors.) THECHANCELLOR RECEIVING ACHARTER FROMEDWARDIII (From the Chancellor's book, circ. 1375.) MASTER ANDSCHOLAR (From the title-page of Burley'sTractatus de natura et forma.) THEBEDEL OFDIVINITY'SSTAFF PROCTOR ANDSCHOLARS OF THERITARNOOTSEPERIOD (FromHabitus Academicorum, attributed to D. Loggan, 1674.) THEINTERIOR OF THEDIVINITYSCHOOL
CHAPTER I THE DEGREE CEREMONY[Pg 1] The streets of Oxford are seldom dull in term time, but a stranger who chances to pass through them between the hours of nine and ten on the morning of a degree day, will be struck and perhaps perplexed by their unwonted animation. He will find the quads of the great block of University buildings, which lie between the 'Broad' and the Radcliffe Square, alive with all sorts and conditions of Oxford men, arrayed in every variety of academic dress. Groups of undergraduates stand waiting, some in the short commoner's gown, others in the more dignified gown of the scholar, all wearing the dark coats and white ties usually associated with the Schools' and examinations, but with their faces free from the look of anxiety incident to those occasions. ' Here and there are knots of Bachelors of Arts, in their ampler gowns with fur-lined hoods, some only removed by a brief three years from their undergraduate days, others who have evidently allowed a much longer period to pass before returning to bring their academic career to its full and complete end. From every college[Pg 2] comes the Dean in his Master's gown and hood, or if he be a Doctor, in the scarlet and grey of one of the new Doctorates, in the dignified scarlet and black of Divinity, or in the bold blending of scarlet and crimson which marks Medicine and Law. College servants, with their arms full of gowns and hoods, will be seen in the background, waiting to assist in the academic robing of their former masters, and to pocket the 'tips' which time-honoured custom prescribes. Presently, when the hour of ten has struck, the procession of academic dignity may be seen approaching
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