Nanny Merry - or, What Made the Difference?

Nanny Merry - or, What Made the Difference?

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Publié le 08 décembre 2010
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The Project Gutenberg eBook, Nanny Merry, by Anonymous
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwwwtug.enberg.org
Title: Nanny Merry
or, What Made the Difference
Author: Anonymous
Release Date: December 14, 2009 [eBook #30681]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK NANNY MERRY***
 
E-text prepared by Delphine Lettau and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team (http://www.pgdp.net)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Click toENLARGE
CHAPTER I. CHAPTER II. CHAPTER III. CHAPTER IV. CHAPTER V. CHAPTER VI. CHAPTER VII.
NANNY MERRY.
 
 
 
Crowning the Queen
Click toENLARGE
NANNY MERRY;
OR,
WHAT MADE THE DIFFERENCE?
 
 
 
 
 
LONDON:
T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
EDINBURGH; AND NEW YORK.
1872.
NANNIE MERRY.
CHAPTER I.
IN WHICH NANNIE IS INTRODUCED.
little brown house, with an old elm-tree before it, a frame of lattice-work around the door, with a broad stone for a step—this is where old Grannie Burt lives. And there she is sitting in the doorway with her Bible in her lap. She can't read it, for she is blind; but she likes to have it by her; she likes the "feeling of it," she says. "When my Bible is away," Grannie Burt sa s, "I am sometimes troubled and worried; but if I can
uort elbu odhw s wenare goe g ina llg no;ef row hat harm can anyt ylno  ,ti hcuooutry  mre aesbl         ta hothtnwt ehp comes dole girl  anttil yreetfoimetvesleibom.SreB leh  oefevt s halway't aoesnd einnarg tuB"?tas latn veea htoreads the blesseehg oo dobkoa dne erw,noak t tesaht oy tes uht e tha, onckettcri eyblcsonneig artiit sndn ow dng nworb ea ,esuohy child. thee, mdob elssassy ,G"heg nor peexinctehs  si t I"knihllreis aket cricht ees ero ,;wf s  ileab tlettli eht no dna ,ydaitllt eht aesrt d words to her, s'eiirw elknaf dckri dlengownnraerbmret h nailgnand ce, ng hlayieh s'lri ehs ,dahe tond  glettli era uoynnar ;eir fo? meitwag int'ocema  Ioclundr, becauny soone detnaw ammam eshCit wayplo  tmeeherna dei ;ahlrachee pe som arepia hetcofr oo caw l retmorf ehtold well that yo ues eujtsb henihoe thd nd ae;ussi ereh ttil ehtirl le gelf.hers-domG"oo,gg nrnitho  tnd ansiosteuq reh rewsna oce tchant a  BurnneiGsarigevci handNe,ni?"ieai sg ,dnnarI llaer "Now shaeaches. roh rep nahkref N dna ";q ,einna lldou wemthe ikteoh,hsy uoguthmma s ma yousent spoim aetunhw ,d anr helktast, htiwhth rew la kuite out of breauom woy  Ink;r" fromarm be wust  dnatsetfos eht heo  titg inndhahT eepcaloy uo". so temph lookedaw g ,kluoy nolril wcol d anisthlittthe itchle phssere ,wo ntad ak ts, aloa g inguard gn morf thirst," said granin,ep ciikgno tu ton checkri."et taEsihtaep f hcany has er oof harnn .G"vereein  Iksee wav han c dna ,nwwef a nihatNannie let th yof r aomemtnt tsghro tleuber h esefles hsiuohtarnntng daesehh nd se, ar onn helno saw tI .luftkeas bleho w aietai wtsil ooek dt Nannieting tha ylnevigh reo dar Hethmoulhf. lytuoba raseb tahttlof"St.lie thy v iottelgenaecb nd I: "A a n sawlahs I ligeb""?nadRebo a hutveea,nN nain;ey uok now I like to he, iennra,gNo "d,w eht ;uoy knahtled  coo hasatereher;hw ongueme s yawaI ase an moht thgu",tnehs ing up t; so taks ehs iaehB bielenorht r.ar ts neaspehe jef , fillfwohttataw o refo deht nsioan; he tat nlani gfo rht eehesare foose leavhw ,efil fo eerte thf  oadree sheh n".T rahtwee da nn aneaveew h
When she had finished, she said, "What makes you like to hear of heaven so much, grannie?" "Oh, I'm going there, Nannie! When you read about the beautiful things, the pearly gates, and the golden streets, I think, 'I shall see them, for there will be no night there; not even in these poor old eyes of mine.' And when you read, 'the Lamb is the light thereof,' then I think Jesus will be there, and that's what I like best of all." "Whereisheaven, grannie?" "Up there, I suppose," she said, pointing to the bright sky above. "But, grannie, there was a gentleman at our house yesterday, and I heard him talking with my father, and he said he thought heaven was in the sun. So I thought I would ask you, because you always know so much about it. Do you think it is in the sun?" "I don't think anything about it. I don't think it makes much differencewhereit is, if we only get there at last." "Sister Mary said she thought heaven would be where God was." "So I think, child; and I don't think it's the pearls, and gold, and all those things you read about, that make it either; for I think any place would be heaven, if we found Jesus there. This old room has been pretty near it, sometimes." Nannie turned to the 14th chapter of John, which she knew grannie loved to hear, and commenced reading. While she is reading, let us go down the street to the lane —bordered with trees—walk up the narrow footpath, and over the stile just by the blackberry-bushes, across the field to the little marigolds, to the white cottage where Nannie lives. You can come to it by the street, if you choose, and you may come in under the great elm-tree, by the gate; but then the street is so dusty, and you miss seeing the little garden with its bright flowers; and the blossoms in the lane smell so sweetly, that it is quite worth while going that way. But here we are, before the door, on which we read, in bright letters, "Dr. Merry;" for Nannie's name is Nannie Merry, and Nannie's father is a doctor. He is doctor in a pleasant little town that is situated on the banks of a narrow river. I don't think you
could fi           on eesu  ni llet tsoreheou w bldse .tIw saa p eling you theirnamht ro nw revir eheit endtoe thr hsuoy uoyr ;dlt our on y, ifmapsnt as ths pleasastle,fo heuoesi  tin hhe late iviuq a etesuoera bricrge e lan th rrDfAetes .hkuopee ths  aenevr i evil taht elpoerneb ildn,sa dn a long porch insi tylnow a etihot cgetawi,  gthnoyednh el .uskcthepBut e theoplc ,tnorfw derevoeeswh it aarritba ,rd dnd yrotco c antous walyonf taeh raNnneis'ved.But eople lii taht flesruoy or fee san cou Ysu.e eohalgrre y a ve intlividn' pndttrewhy e it egr-mleeerta ,sver, with its lasana totnw ,ohewgre the  pstdeanuohegralrehw ,esand ere e a thergaseoctthth  ,iwsos  irehe tso, ih rof esucxe eme hay, wastlm. LesflherenainevN elw wl,wh, iso dniftuo hs e llae is bef what shotyri  sro euosrtsom ekirg,syob astet eand as,erin eN naitemoseminkss thood  a glaedsrowht em nat osysboutbhe t,nC ahlreii  snoly four yearsoldree istsebtsht enks  thinnied Nayrev si ohw ,ellBen he ts;war vey aesro tuwtleev and abo pretty,ra ol ,eeilrhw ,nd aha C; ldhnJoerrys. M Nan, orrr y .eM srMocemik ls, i mstmoe toms'einohw ,rehd and good; thentoehsr ,evyrk nis  iowgrupn an, tsisM re,yraohw ause becnnie gralaomi  sehertst esdoe sh nhy"W."nnaN ,to,hO""?eiBrown knows so mcu hbauo ttia  sbo a hutveea In;nod htt' kni .rMihkneit arnn!yg u dos yost as juttil eht ni sredar M"On.dear glegno eno i wseeidetty borf the pr,sporof hs tts er teryMaer his slit ,rewsal ta lli aenthlo slett gtannnits ,f ris west a, ru didyb geht nal uj er.hehe S cisinom patklni gbauo t, so we must sto'srtBue nianGrm orfsemoc ehs ereut ht. Bt ou thaeltfw  e dfineedelfeff owondd ulnet a ",en" ylraars old, nine ye .hS esiifinhsdeehw od nnaN ;einkelio  tt n'u yotui ?t"ehraa obtil reh htiw eliayplhe soeshe tlepbbht eti hdew ays! alw"Notles.tuh aeev,nN nainlike to hear abo ehswsnaderehw ,""e?meSometi" s,uo t dbaw ehohemjusten, I di as ".s'hara uoy oD"s waI n tSun Aatso; and he said ""hW,ys  thtre?eutboavheheo  aarvol t senehtehs hat !""Wknowt touohghs eyr, ,aMoslm aise niangr kniht uoy sekam