A lexilogus of the English, Malay, and Chinese languages : comprehending the vernacular idioms of the last in the Hok-keen and Canton dialects

A lexilogus of the English, Malay, and Chinese languages : comprehending the vernacular idioms of the last in the Hok-keen and Canton dialects

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-JOHN -FRYER* CHINESE- LIBRARY- si h«K/C)fH A LEXILOGUS TOMOF CHINESEAND LANGUAGES;MALAY,l^NGLlSe, COMPREHEN DING IDIOMS OF THE LAST IN THK IIOK-KEEN CWi'ON DIAl.ECIYRIJNACULAR ANDTHE COLLEGE PRESSANGLO-CHINESE•I'RiNTED AT THE * MALACCA. 1841, Lib.Main lOHM FRYER LIBRARYCHINESE PREFACE ^ of andHE of the volume is a collection Englishfollowing Phrasesgroundwork Malay end of last Mr North of the Americanin the Mission, Onyear, by Sinijapore. receiv-published, that its usefulness wouldof that it occurred to the Editor bea Colieciion, considera-Copvings more ofthe addition of the Cliinese vernacular in one or theinrri rised Dialectsbly by spoken ol it intoin the Straits. He had translated a considerable thepart vernacularacrordinijly of thewhen he was induced and enabled the assistance Rev. Mr. oftheCanton, by Brown, extend the so as to enibrace at onreii:n dans^er, indeed, rejcctins: many expressions, are their idionis of th- ir ownwhich Chin from 4 withreally se, withcorresjK)ndin languas^e, are familiar. There is to l>e sure a on the otheralready greater danger hand ofthey into an nnidiomatic but bold who willtheir falling he must be a man,style; pronounce ajjainst an emanatiiiii from a native becauseit seems to savour ofanotherChinese,expression, language. The Canton verna^ (Ej f^^1^Hid-ay - ch'ut shing.sM(jfc ;teiitn. ^ ;JnTeum ^/^ ' •Tsz' 'T* >\^'^^^5?saiVSay je-say je. -^^"shaark'h^ l^e. "N^J^'i'jUK'hca Ts'ing'ts'ing'tso'lok. J£^tsbay.

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-JOHN -FRYER*
CHINESE- LIBRARY-si
h«K/C)fH
A LEXILOGUS
TOMOF
CHINESEAND LANGUAGES;MALAY,l^NGLlSe,
COMPREHEN DING
IDIOMS OF THE LAST IN THK IIOK-KEEN CWi'ON DIAl.ECIYRIJNACULAR ANDTHE
COLLEGE PRESSANGLO-CHINESE•I'RiNTED AT THE
*
MALACCA.
1841,Lib.Main
lOHM FRYER
LIBRARYCHINESEPREFACE
^ of andHE of the volume is a collection Englishfollowing Phrasesgroundwork Malay
end of last Mr North of the Americanin the Mission, Onyear, by Sinijapore. receiv-published,
that its usefulness wouldof that it occurred to the Editor bea Colieciion, considera-Copvings
more ofthe addition of the Cliinese vernacular in one or theinrri rised Dialectsbly by spoken
ol it intoin the Straits. He had translated a considerable thepart vernacularacrordinijly
of thewhen he was induced and enabled the assistance Rev. Mr. oftheCanton, by Brown,
extend the so as to enibrace at on<;e a v«Morrison Education to rsion intoidan,Society, good
wirh the vernacular in two diaie< ts in Roman Character.Chinese, correspondinij
that be found at once faithful to theThe Editor trusts the Chinese will and suffi-original,
idiomatic. If is the work <»f a Chinaman of considerable both in hisacquirementsciently
and in The which be discovered in someown Enjriish. of thelanijuau'e harshness, may phra-
The Editor wasis to be attributed to their insulation. struck withses, princioally this,
the sheets were the He and some other foreignwhile coinu through students ob-press.
andto Some as Eniilish in a Chinese more thanbeioij dres**; onejected expressions, only
<o others, as not wereSocn-Shanif l*eintr flowing. butThey accordinglyobjected changed ;
have in themost of the original since been met of thewith, progress Editor'sexpressions
Chinese students are in ofReadinsr. F>reii:n dans^er, indeed, rejcctins: many expressions,
are their idionis of th- ir ownwhich Chin from 4 withreally se, withcorresjK)ndin languas^e, are familiar. There is to l>e sure a on the otheralready greater danger hand ofthey
into an nnidiomatic but bold who willtheir falling he must be a man,style; pronounce ajjainst
an emanatiiiii from a native becauseit seems to savour ofanotherChinese,expression, language.
The Canton verna<"ular is the of the sanae and was takenindividual, down fromproduction
his thedictation Rev. Mr to the in MrBrown, accordingby orthography adopted Bridgman's
There be a diflVrencc in tbe initial of some of thesounds as the-Chrestomathy. words,may
rfferred toChinaman is not from Canton but from a about le in the interior.village,city, fifty
This however is not of as these differences seem togreat no ob-importance,very interpose
struction to his fluent with Canton.intercourse natives of
In the H')k-keen considerable assistance was dierived from the Rev.preparing vernacular,
Mr of the American Board for and from bis a ChinamanAbeel, Missions, teacher,foreign
of the ofrank Sew-Tsae.
It was at first to conform it to the same as the but theattempted orthography, Canton;
endeavour was soon ofseveralfrom its the introduction new vowolabandoned, andrequiring
sounds into a Thedipththong system, already surely sufficiently complicated. orthography
will he found to with that in Mr. of theadopted correspond nearly empioyed Dyer's Vocabulary
Hok-keen Dialect.
The is of that it would have been an bad heEditor, however, opinion adheredimprovement
to the Mr. and also to his of ch'h anddipththong-.sounds employed by Medhurst, orthography
ch for the sounds denoted in this volume ch and and in Mr.respectively tsh,by Dyer's
b\ c'h and tsh.Vocabulary
The distinction between these sounds andis lobedeserving attentio*, dUghtparticular
a studentforeign from the of the natives.carefully caught byup lips
It is not todeemed a table of this because itnecessary harmonizessubjoin orthography,
with the to the vowels and inbelonging consonants English.powers
The Editor has in toconclusion the of better withscholars,request indulgence acquainted
tile Chinese than to the will discover in thehimself, errors which work. Helangtiage m^ny they
reerets the of instead of which extendsparticularly wrong orthography Chid-S,y TshidSy,
a third ofthe also of tor and lorthrough volume,nearly part cheyh, bogyh boeyh.tshayh
He trusts thesenotwithstanding that the book will be fotrnd serviceablre inthings Schools,
for which it is and to those are their ideas in Chinese-whoprincipally got up, beginning toUsp
747742SOUNDSVOWEL AND DIPTHTHONGTABLE OF
IN THF MALAY.EMPLOYED
u over it shows that the accenta with the mark is notas in sraduh.a father,
on that syllable.*
in a with a conso^As in whenc as in den, syllable endingmerah, nieja.they,
asnant, pendek.
when in a with aAs inas in syllable endingi machine, tipu, hilang. pin,
consonant, as pintu.
are follwed twoin and i as inE as always by consonants, exceptpin,pen,
in the last syllable,
ino as kotor,pole, tong.
as in tukans:,n full, tutup.
in accentedIt occursu as in only syllable, prefixes excepted,but, nugri, kiirja.
heiran.as inei height, sampei,
This sound seldom occurs.in kwat.a as what,
not are accented on the secondWords of three when marked,syllables,
on the third.Thns : Siilasei is accented on the first, panchahdsyllable.
Employed Dialect.Table ofOrthography in the Canton
Vowels and Diphthongs.
short u in suia as This is a sound and must be learned1. tun, pun. generis,pronounced
from a native.
as in calm,d balm,2. father.
a in as inas and ei3. € ?nay, lay, neigh.pronounced
short as inKi pin, sin, sing.
as ini long machine, marine,l police.
tall.as in asaw in and as a in5, 6 lord, awful, all,pronounced
as in no. so or as ow ind snow, U^w,6. ; glow.
in in_ Cm as hull, or as oo book.pull; foot,
as in rule or oo in school,
; fool.X^L pronounced
in Vune the sound.ii as French8. ;
in in but closer.as aisle as ie in tie or as i« ai ; ; life,Q
like the worddi nearlyI pronounced aye.
in in but closer.as ou our or as ow cow,au brow,plough, ;^
like the with the adw long.precediuij,i
with both letters the contractiondistinct, em,11. i,u resembling colloquial say*pronounced
in oras ew but more onen12. i^ pew. lengthened.
as in or inoi oil;13. oy alloy. joy,
as in butui ruined, more14. nearly fluid, open.pronounced
like the m15. Hi with long. preceding