Forty Days with the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion
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113 pages
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The Thirty-nine Articles of Religion of the Church of England.

Are they a dusty relic of the sixteenth century, with little to say to Anglican Christians in this brave new world of the twenty-first century? Or do they form a statement that is ideally suited to strengthen and unify them in their faith?

Robert Langmaid argues that the latter is the case. He believes that the articles, which were written by English Reformers in 1533 and put in their current revised form in 1662, provide fertile ground for the growth of churches and believers in the Communion. Furthermore, he writes, the articles not only can inform individual and corporate discussions concerning Anglican identity, but can also serve as a basis of spiritual meditation.

How is it that the articles can do all this? Because the Reformers and the English church were careful to ground them securely in the Bible and in the first four general councils of the Christian church and the three ecumenical statements of belief (the Nicene, Apostles', and Athanasian creeds). In fact, Langmaid argues, a new consideration of the articles will call Anglicans to renew their historical allegiance to the Bible and the Lordship of Christ and thereby provide the backdrop for greater and more effective diversity throughout the Anglican Communion.

Besides taking the reader through forty days of meditating on the articles, this valuable contribution to Anglican and ecumenical thought includes two essays on the Articles of Religion and Anglican identity and a version of the articles in modern English by Peter Toon.

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Date de parution 01 janvier 2013
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EAN13 9781927483640
Langue English

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Forty Days with the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion
Forty Days with the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion
A Devotional Guide
Robert G.W. Langmaid

Toronto and New York
Copyright © 2013 by Robert Gerald William Langmaid
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.
Published in 2013 by BPS Books Toronto and New York www.bpsbooks.com A division of Bastian Publishing Services Ltd.
Paperback ISBN 978-1-927483-44-2 ePDF ISBN 978-1-927483-65-7 ePUB ISBN 978-1-927483-64-0
Cataloguing-in-Publication Data avaiable from Library and Archives Canada.
Cover: Gnibel Text design and typesetting: Daniel Crack, Kinetics Design, kdbooks.ca
All scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version ® , NIV ® . Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide. www.zondervan.com The “NIV” and “New International Version” are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office by Biblica, Inc. ™
Every effort has been made to trace copyright holders and to obtain their permission for the use of copyright material. The publisher apologizes for any errors or omissions in this regard and would be grateful if notified of any corrections that should be incorporated in future reprints or editions of this book.
To my wife, Monica, for your help and encouragement as I worked on this book
C ONTENTS
P REFACE
I NTRODUCTION
P ART I
F ORTY D AYS WITH THE T HIRTY-NINE A RTICLES
DAY 1 ARTICLE I O F F AITH IN THE H OLY T RINITY
DAY 2 ARTICLE II O F THE W ORD OR S ON OF G OD , WHICH WAS MADE VERY M AN
DAY 3 ARTICLE III O F THE GOING DOWN OF C HRIST INTO H ELL
DAY 4 ARTICLE IV O F THE R ESURRECTION OF C HRIST
DAY 5 ARTICLE V O F THE H OLY G HOST
DAY 6 ARTICLE VI O F THE S UFFICIENCY OF THE H OLY S CRIPTURES FOR S ALVATION
DAY 7 ARTICLE VII O F THE O LD T ESTAMENT
DAY 8 ARTICLE VIII O F THE T HREE C REEDS
DAY 9 ARTICLE IX O F O RIGINAL OR B IRTH-SIN
DAY 10 ARTICLE X O F F REE -W ILL
DAY 11 ARTICLE XI O F THE J USTIFICATION OF M AN
DAY 12 ARTICLE XII O F G OOD W ORKS
DAY 13 ARTICLE XIII O F W ORKS BEFORE J USTIFICATION
DAY 14 ARTICLE XIV O F W ORKS OF S UPEREROGATION
DAY 15 ARTICLE XV O F C HRIST ALONE WITHOUT S IN
DAY 16 ARTICLE XVI O F S IN AFTER B APTISM
DAY 17 ARTICLE XVII O F P REDESTINATION AND E LECTION
DAY 18 ARTICLE XVIII O F OBTAINING ETERNAL S ALVATION ONLY BY THE N AME OF C HRIST
DAY 19 ARTICLE XIX O F THE C HURCH
DAY 20 ARTICLE XX O F THE A UTHORITY OF THE C HURCH
DAY 21 ARTICLE XXI O F THE A UTHORITY OF G ENERAL C OUNCILS
DAY 22 ARTICLE XXII O F P URGATORY
DAY 23 ARTICLE XXIII O F M INISTERING IN THE C ONGREGATION
DAY 24 ARTICLE XXIV O F SPEAKING IN THE C ONGREGATION IN SUCH A TONGUE AS THE PEOPLE UNDERSTANDETH
DAY 25 ARTICLE XXV O F THE S ACRAMENTS
DAY 26 ARTICLE XXVI O F THE U NWORTHINESS OF THE M INISTERS, WHICH HINDERS NOT THE EFFECT OF THE S ACRAMENT
DAY 27 ARTICLE XXVII O F B APTISM
DAY 28 ARTICLE XXVIII O F THE L ORD ’ S S UPPER
DAY 29 ARTICLE XXIX O F THE W ICKED WHICH EAT NOT THE B ODY OF C HRIST IN THE USE OF THE L ORD ’ S S UPPER
DAY 30 ARTICLE XXX O F BOTH KINDS
DAY 31 ARTICLE XXXI O F THE ONE O BLATION OF C HRIST FINISHED UPON THE C ROSS
DAY 32 ARTICLE XXXII O F THE M ARRIAGE OF P RIESTS
DAY 33 ARTICLE XXXIII O F EXCOMMUNICATE P ERSONS, HOW THEY ARE TO BE AVOIDED
DAY 34 ARTICLE XXXIV O F THE T RADITIONS OF THE C HURCH
DAY 35 ARTICLE XXXV O F THE H OMILIES
DAY 36 ARTICLE XXXVI O F THE C ONSECRATION OF B ISHOPS AND M INISTERS
DAY 37 ARTICLE XXXVII O F THE C IVIL M AGISTRATES
DAY 38 ARTICLE XXXVIII O F C HRISTIAN MEN ’ S G OODS, WHICH ARE NOT COMMON
DAY 39 ARTICLE XXXIX O F A C HRISTIAN MAN ’ S O ATH
DAY 40 T HE W AY F ORWARD
P ART II
T HE T HIRTY-NINE A RTICLES OF R ELIGION AND A NGLICAN I DENTITY
I NTRODUCTION TO P ART II
1 T HE S UPREMACY OF S CRIPTURE AND L ORDSHIP OF C HRIST
2 T HE T HIRTY-NINE A RTICLES IN THE T WENTY-FIRST C ENTURY
A PPENDIX
T HE T HIRTY-NINE A RTICLES OF R ELIGION : C ONVERTED TO M ODERN E NGLISH BY P ETER T OON
B IBLIOGRAPHY
P REFACE
I have written this book as a contribution to the Anglican Communion worldwide, and more specifically to the Anglican Church in Canada, in which I serve as both an evangelist in Threshold Ministries (formerly called Church Army in Canada) and a Deacon in the Parish of Watson Lake, Diocese of Yukon. The book reproduces, and comments on, the famous Thirty-nine Articles of Religion, written by English Reformers in a process that began close to five hundred years ago, in 1533. The articles were agreed on by the Archbishops of Canterbury and York in Convocation at London in 1562, finalized in 1571, and revised in 1662. They became the foundational theological statement of the Church of England and thence of churches that have sprung up in that tradition around the world.
I would like to suggest three ways in which this book may be useful.
First and foremost, it is set up as a forty-day devotional or reflection guide for individual Christians in the church. It is hoped that, by spending time with the articles, such readers will become more securely grounded in their faith.
Second, it can be repurposed as a forty-week study for confirmation classes. Each weekly class in roughly a year of classes could end with one of the Articles of Religion, along with my comments as discussion points. This could help the next generation of Anglican Christians to know their spiritual heritage and their identity as people whose faith is rooted in the Lordship of Jesus and the supremacy of scripture.
Third, this book may be used by ministers as sermon material. I discovered this use quite accidentally. One week my train of thought while I was preparing a sermon led me to a devotional that I had written about one of the articles. The result, a sermon derived quite extensively from that devotional, was well received by the congregation. I offer this approach to preachers throughout the Anglican Communion.
I NTRODUCTION
A NGLICAN CHURCHES in North America are experiencing a crisis of identity. Emerging Anglican groups, such as the Anglican Network in Canada and the Anglican Church of North America, as well as the mainline churches themselves – the Anglican Church of Canada and the Episcopal Church (United States) – are attempting to determine the tenets of their faith and theology. Thus, those who identify themselves as Anglicans (or Episcopalians), and those attending churches that identify themselves as Anglican, are either examining or need to examine the biblical and historical background of Anglican theology.
This identity crisis is at root a theological and spiritual crisis. I myself experienced it as a spiritual crisis. I attended an Anglican church growing up. I was baptized as an infant and confirmed in early adolescence. I was both a server and crucifer in my church, and I attended Anglican summer camps. At the age of sixteen, I attended a youth retreat called Teens Encounter Christ, and I did, indeed, encounter him, in a way that changed the direction of my life. Church, instead of being something I simply attended, became a large part of who I was.
By the time I was nineteen, I was very involved with various Christian groups at university. As I got to know Christians from a variety of denominational backgrounds, I naturally began to question why I worshipped in an Anglican context instead of some other. I started to question why an Anglican expression of Christianity mattered to me. These questions led me to examine the heart of Anglican identity, and I figured the best way to do this was to explore the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion contained in the Anglican Book of Common Prayer. These articles were written by Church of England theologians in the sixteenth century and were made part of the BCP, and they speak with great strength all these many centuries later.
I examined each article over a period lasting a little longer than a month. I found where each fit in the context of scripture and examined the relevant supporting biblical passages. I then asked whether my understanding of faith could fit with the article. As a result of this study, I confirmed the Thirty-nine Articles as a strong and sure framework for my faith. I have written this book to encourage you to take the same journey: to consider how your beliefs line up with Anglican Christianity as stated in the Thirty-nine Articles.
No doubt many Anglicans and others may wonder what relevance the articles have for today. You yourself may be asking why anyone should study them at all. Here are just three reasons.
First, doing so can help parishioners understand their Anglican faith at the micro level organizationally – that is, at the level of their local church. Historically, to be ordained, Anglican priests gave assent to the Canons of the Church of England and The Book of Common Prayer. (“Canons” simply means “laws.”) The BCP includes the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion as well as the official order of the various worship services, including services of ordination. 1
This means that every priest ordained in Canada and England and several other places in the Anglican tradition have given assent, at least nominally, to the articles. (The main exception to this requirement is the Episcopal Church, United States.) Therefore, (a) an Anglican priest’s expression of faith should reflect the faith defined by the articles as the starting point of Anglican theology and (b) when parishioners understand the articles, they have a picture, in broad strokes, of how their church and their priest are to conduct themselves.
_________
1 Canons of the Church of England, 1970, Canon A2; The Book of Common Prayer, Canada, 1962.
Second, understanding the Thirty-nine Articles helps parishioners understand their Anglican faith at the macro level of the Anglican tradition . While giving great leeway for different expressions, and even beliefs, in the Christian faith, the articles also clearly distinguish Anglican Christianity from other streams of the Christian faith. This may be seen in various articles, including XXII and XXVII.
Third, the articles are part of a major Anglican spiritual inheritance at an even greater macro level, the ecumenical level . Yes, The Book of Common Prayer, including the articles, is specific to churches in the Anglican Communion, but the articles themselves draw on the major sources of orthodox Christianity: the Old Testament and New Testament, the first four general councils of the church, and the three ecumenical creeds. 1
In short, a deeper understanding of the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion can ground you in your Christian faith, understanding, and practice at the local, traditional, and ecumenical levels.
I encourage you to take the journey of this book with me. Each chapter in Part I explores one article and concludes with an invitation to prayer and suggestions for applying the article to your own life. This part of the book is divided into forty days; there is one article for each day and a concluding day encouraging you to move forward in the faith. You will benefit most from this book if you develop a consistent daily reading practice.
_________
1 Stephen Neill, Anglicanism , p. 399.
In Part II , I explore the articles and Anglican identity more theologically, for those who wish to go deeper into the background of the articles.
The book also includes an appendix with a modern translation of the Thirty-nine Articles, which may be referred to if the original text is confusing – after all, the original wording of the articles was written in a much earlier form of the English language.
May the Lord Jesus richly bless you as you gain a deeper understanding of your faith.
P ART I
F ORTY D AYS WITH THE T HIRTY-NINE A RTICLES
DAY 1
ARTICLE I
O F F AITH IN THE H OLY T RINITY .
T here is but one living and true God, everlasting, without body, parts, or passions; of infinite power, wisdom, and goodness; the Maker, and Preserver of all things both visible and invisible. And in unity of this Godhead there be three Persons, of one substance, power, and eternity; the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost .
T HE first Article of Religion helps us understand the nature of God, both as Trinity and as the everlasting, all-powerful One. As we think about God, we need to remember some key things.
The first is that there is only one God. Anything or anyone claiming to be “a god” among many gods cannot be the true God. Yet we live in a world where many people hold various conflicting religious beliefs and moral philosophies. Sometimes when we deal with people from different backgrounds, we are tempted to seek harmony, even when our beliefs are contradictory. However, once we compromise essentials, such as the belief that there is only one God, represented in the unity of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, we begin to lose part of our own identity.
I believe a better alternative to dealing with a diversity of beliefs is for us to cling more strongly to our own faith. When we have a well-rooted belief in the Triune God, we can more easily identify the positive aspects in another’s belief system without sacrificing our own spiritual identity. A Bible verse that reminds us of the Oneness of God is Deuteronomy 6:4: “Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God, the LORD is one.” This verse forms the preamble to what Jesus calls the greatest commandment: “… Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind” (Matthew 22:37).
Some readers may be thinking, Wait, the verse in Deuteronomy speaks of God as one. How can we then say that God is Father, Son, and Holy Spirit? The answer to this is twofold. First, the word used for “one” in Deuteronomy can be interpreted as plural and singular at the same time. Second, God, or the Godhead, as the article describes him, comprises the unity of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit: three different persons with the same substance and power. They are different from each other, yet still so much the same in nature that it is impossible to tell them apart. Consider the analogy of a helicopter with three blades. When the blades are spinning, it is impossible to perceive any blade individually. They move so fast and in such unity that they are indistinguishable from each other. Together, they comprise the mechanism for flying the helicopter. This is similar to our understanding of the Trinity as being three persons in one.
The second thing to remember is God’s everlasting nature. This concept may be an even harder concept for us to wrap our head around than the mystery of the Trinity. However, if God is the creator of everything, then even time itself is something he created, not something he is subject to. As a result, it is impossible to talk about a time before God; without him there is no before. Genesis 1:1 states, “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.” John 1:1 reinforces this concept: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” God pre-exists time.
What does all this mean for us? First, it means we need to cling to God. Many other religious traditions may come our way, and although we can learn from them, we cannot compromise the belief that there is only one true God who has revealed himself as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Second, recognizing the eternal nature of God, we can start to understand that even if we don’t comprehend the past or the future, he does. When we trust in God, he can help us move forward in healthy ways, so we can grow to know him more.
Spend five minutes in silent prayer, focusing on God as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Ask him to bring to mind what this means for you. Ask him to show you how he has been present in your life. Then, if you feel comfortable doing so, speak out a prayer of thanks to God for his presence with you thus far .
DAY 2
ARTICLE II
O F THE W ORD OR S ON OF G OD, WHICH WAS MADE VERY M AN .
T he Son, which is the Word of the Father, begotten from everlasting of the Father, the very and eternal God, and of one substance with the Father, took Man’s nature in the womb of the blessed Virgin, of her substance: so that two whole and perfect Natures, that is to say, the Godhead and Manhood, were joined together in one Person, never to be divided, whereof is one Christ, very God, and very Man; who truly suffered, was crucified, dead and buried, to reconcile his Father to us, and to be a sacrifice, not only for original guilt, but also for all actual sins of men .
T HIS article deals with the nature of Jesus. Specifically, it deals with how and why he came to earth, and how he is both God and man.
Let us think through how Jesus could be both God and man at the same time. Some may think that the Godhead and manhood joining together would create some form of demigod, like those in Greek and Roman mythology. Yet this is not the case with Jesus. God the Father didn’t have physical union with Mary the mother of Jesus so that Jesus could be born in some semi-natural way. Instead, God did something special for Jesus to enter the world. The power of God rested upon a virgin, took her genetic material, and Jesus was conceived. He was both fully man from his human conception, yet he was also fully God, as the Godhead cannot be divided. Jesus existed from the beginning as the Word who was with the Father and the Holy Spirit, even before time began. When he was born, the eternal Word became a new creation; the eternal, immortal one became human, even though the Word pre-existed his conception as Jesus.
Why would the eternal God choose to come and live as one of his creatures? Why would the immortal God choose to live a life of sorrow and suffering that would inevitably end in death on a cross? The answer to these questions is found in the article. The Word chose to live a human life as Jesus, to suffer and to die on a cross in order to reconcile us, his creation, to the Father. Jesus became a sacrifice so that the sins of all humanity could be forgiven. Once sin has been dealt with, it is possible for us to have fellowship with the Father. Jesus did even more: He became the embodiment of Israel, showing the true return from exile, and serving as the leader of new humanity, according to God’s will. 1
It is key to remember in all of this that the Father initiates reconciliation. This implies that we must be willing to accept this sacrifice and reconciliation in order to receive it. If we choose to reject the reconciliation that Jesus provided at the cross, God will honour that rejection. If we persist in our rejection of Jesus (and the reconciliation that the Father offers us) until death, God will honour that choice of separation from him. However, I believe there will be no more opportunities to change our decision at that point.
What can we take from this article to apply to our lives? First, we can see the love God has for us. God the Son was willing to become like one of us and suffer all that we suffer. He then faced death as a sacrifice for our selfishness and all that is contrary to the way God would have us live. Second, once we see this love we can respond to it, accepting the sacrifice of Jesus and reconciliation to the Father. We can also respond by recognizing that, in becoming like one of us, Jesus experienced all our sufferings and hurts. Our God fully understands what we go through. We can trust him with our suffering because he has been there. We can rely on him to support us through our own times of suffering.
Taking a few minutes to pray, reflect on times when you have experienced suffering. Then ask God to show you the role he played while you were dealing with suffering. Once you have done this, ask God to show the power of the cross in your life and to reveal any area of your life that still needs to be reconciled to God the Father. Ask God to meet you in your place of need .
_________
1 N. T. Wright, Jesus and the Victory of God , pp. 274–75, 477–81, 657–22.
DAY 3
ARTICLE III
O F THE GOING DOWN OF C HRIST INTO H ELL .
A s Christ died for us, and was buried, so also is it to be believed, that he went down into Hell .
A RTICLE III deals with a concept that is rarely discussed or preached in the church today. The article centres on a misunderstanding of the Apostles’ Creed that has caused much discussion over the centuries. The creed contains the line, “He descended into Hell.” However, the original version of the creed reads, “He descended to Hades.” The term “Hades” was used to refer to the place of the dead.
This phrase was crucial to the creed because it countered those who argued that Jesus did not really die on the cross but only appeared to be dead. Some people have asserted that Jesus only fainted on the cross; that he did not actually die. Among these are nineteenth-century thinkers such as Karl Bahrdt and Karl Venturini. 1 As well, many conspiracy theorists have tried to suggest that the death and resurrection of Jesus were fabricated as a hoax to attract followers. 1 Yet consider some of the medical evidence in scripture that Jesus did die.
_________
1 Lee Strobel, The Case for Christ , p. 256.
When Jesus was whipped, the amount of blood he lost would have caused anyone to fall into hypovolemic shock, a condition causing extreme thirst. 2
Jesus’ words in John 19:28, “I am thirsty,” give evidence that his body was reacting in a normal human way to the extreme torture he experienced.
The biblical account of the crucifixion includes the nailing of Jesus to the cross. This would have required him to push on the nails through his feet and pull on the nails in his hands just to be able to breathe. 3 The breaths that Jesus was able to take would have been very shallow, causing an increase of carbon dioxide in his body. This, in turn, would cause an irregular heartbeat, which, when combined with hypovolemic shock, surely would have caused heart failure . 4 The evidence of this heart failure is found in John 19:34: “… one of the soldiers pierced Jesus’ side with a spear, bringing a sudden flow of blood and water.” Death by heart failure is known to cause pericardial effusion and pleural effusion to build up around the heart and in the chest cavity. These bodily fluids are very similar in appearance to water. This accounts for the water (and blood) that came from Jesus’ side, as described in the gospel of John . 5
Christ died, was buried, and went down to the dead, but what does this mean for us? Personally, I am exceedingly grateful that Jesus paid the price for sin so I would not have to. He faced a cruel death on a Roman cross, which, by most accounts, is one of the most painful methods of execution humans have ever devised. With that act, the power of sin over us and in us was broken. Jesus rose from the grave so that we could be free. We must put our trust only in him.
As a prayer of response to the truth revealed in today’s article, spend a few minutes in silence, focusing on Jesus. Take the time to become aware of his presence with you. Once you have done this, thank him for dying on the cross for you. Allow yourself to be free in prayer conversation with Jesus; other things for which you are thankful may come to mind .
_________
1 Strobel, p. 256.
2 Ibid., p. 262.
3 Ibid., pp. 265–66.
4 Ibid., p. 266.
5 Ibid., pp. 266–67.
DAY 4
ARTICLE IV
O F THE R ESURRECTION OF C HRIST .
C hrist did truly rise again from death, and took again his body, with flesh, bones, and all things appertaining to the perfection of Man’s nature; wherewith he ascended into Heaven, and there sitteth, until he return to judge all Men at the last day .
T ODAY we look at an article that brings forth the most important concept of the Christian faith: the resurrection of Jesus. You may ask why the resurrection is so important. Is it possible to still be a Christian while believing that Jesus was a good man who taught good things and died at the hands of the Roman government? The answer to this is a resounding no! If Jesus was not raised from the dead, his teaching would be invalid, and Christianity as a whole would be nullified.
Paul, in 1 Corinthians 15:17, writes, “And If Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile; you are still in your sins.” For Paul, the issue is very clear: The Christian faith depends on the resurrection. Jesus spoke of his resurrection before his death, so if the resurrection did not occur, Jesus is false.
Examining Jesus in all earnestness, based on just his teachings and not even considering his acts, we are left with only three choices about his identity: Jesus was a liar, Jesus was a lunatic, or Jesus is God’s designated ruler. 1 Jesus said many wise and good things, but he also said things like, “I and the Father are one” (John 10:30) and that he would rise from the grave (Luke 18:33). So we are still left with the three choices about Jesus previously mentioned. Let us consider them.
First, assuming the resurrection was false, if what Jesus said about his resurrection was false, and he knew it was false, this means he was a great deceiver and a liar.
Second, if Jesus didn’t know that what he said about the resurrection was false and he said it with full assurance (but there was no resurrection), then he fully believed something only a deceived person or possibly a lunatic would believe.
The third option is the one I believe to be correct: Jesus knew that what he was saying about his resurrection was true and his resurrection proves that it is true.
An important thing to remember about the resurrection is that Jesus’ risen body was the same body that was crucified. Remember that he still had the nail marks in his hands and feet and the spear wound in his side (John 20:24–21). The resurrection affected a physical body; not some disembodied spirit or ghost, but a physical body. The implication is that, if Jesus’ resurrection foreshadows the resurrection of all believers on the last day, then we will still have our physical body. For me, this makes the thought of life after the resurrection more real: We will be changed by the resurrection but will still be who we are. It is a comforting thought to know that I won’t spend eternity as some disembodied spirit, but that I will have a body in which to spend eternity with the Lord Jesus.
This article also deals with another key concept: the ascension of Jesus into heaven. The resurrection shows that Jesus is Lord based on all that he taught. The ascension shows where Jesus is now: at the Father’s right hand. What does this mean for us? It means that the same Jesus who loved us enough to die for us is now in heaven with the Father – and we may bring all of our prayers and needs to him! Jesus is in heaven, and has shown us the way to his kingdom. If we place our faith in Jesus, we can place our trust in his kingdom and resurrection also.
Some final thoughts on the implication of this article for our lives: Because we have faith in the resurrection of Jesus, we can have faith in our own resurrection. We should not fear death as the final event; we should see it as only a transition to life everlasting. The resurrection should give us confidence to follow Jesus, regardless of the dangers involved.
Read John chapters 20 and 21 and prayerfully ask the Lord to bring to mind what the resurrection means in your own life .
_________
1 C. S. Lewis, Mere Christianity , pp. 54–56.
DAY 5
ARTICLE V
O F THE H OLY G HOST .
T he Holy Ghost, proceeding from the Father and the Son, is of one substance, majesty, and glory, with the Father and the Son, very and eternal God .
I N today’s article, we learn more about the Holy Ghost. If you prefer, he may be referred to as the Holy Spirit. The words are interchangeable and have the same meaning. The former comes from the Germanic heritage of the English language, while the latter comes from the Latin.

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